New answers tagged

-1

We know the complete liberation from dukkha is possible by eliminating thinking.


2

Does nirodha samapatti aka saññā-vedayita-nirodha refer to a super trance-like state beyond the 8th jhana in which the practitioner becomes completely unconscious without any mental activity (like what the commentary above suggests) with cessation of ALL perception and feeling? Yes. Or does nirodha samapatti aka saññā-vedayita-nirodha refer to Nibbana-...


0

In short, does nirodha samapatti aka saññā-vedayita-nirodha mean cessation of ALL perception and feeling, or only clinging to perception and feeling? Perhaps it's helpful to remember that cessation of dukkha is the goal. A "trace-like state" implies to me a disconnection from reality, a non-responsiveness. I wonder if instead, or more specifically, ...


0

Does nirodha samapatti aka saññā-vedayita-nirodha refer to a super trance-like state beyond the 8th jhana in which the practitioner becomes completely unconscious without any mental activity (like what the commentary above suggests) with cessation of ALL perception and feeling? I think the question can be framed like they did in the sutta. Then Ven. Ananda ...


4

It was taught to Anurādha, That the Buddha himself Wasn’t to be regarded, As a real and genuine fact. Not being a real and genuine fact, How can it be that the death Of the Buddha should be Regarded as a real and genuine fact? Not being a real and genuine fact, How can it be that the Nirvana Of the Buddha should be Regarded as a real and genuine fact? If the ...


0

I found this answer helpful. The experience I asked about in the question, i.e. the thought or experience which prompted the question, could be phrased as a positive ... "I'm glad I did X which was a good thing!" ... but when I experienced it, it was more precisely phrased as a negative ... "I'm glad I didn't do Y which would have been a bad ...


2

Nirvana isn't a thing. Were it a thing it'd be subject to aging and death. No thing exists Without aging and death. If nirvana were a thing, It'd be compounded. A non-compounded thing, Doesn't exist anywhere. If nirvana were a thing, It'd be conditioned. A non-conditioned thing, Doesn't exist anywhere. Nirvana isn't the absence of a thing. How could it be ...


2

Both cataphatic and apophatic definitions of Nibbana are reconciled here: At one time Venerable Sāriputta was staying near Rājagaha, in the Bamboo Grove, the squirrels’ feeding ground. There he addressed the mendicants: “Reverends, Nibbana is bliss! Nibbana is bliss!” When he said this, Venerable Udāyī said to him, “But Reverend Sāriputta, what’s blissful ...


-1

impermanence or disintegration is the lack of a thing being able to endure into the next moment thru its own power therefore the ending of the thing is the nature of its production. like that ur death is uncaused by virtue of ur having been born. u need nothing else and so ur death is unconditioned. similarly nirvana is this but applied to your mind and its ...


0

Is a via positiva, cataphatic definition rationally, linguistically even possible? No, it's not. Could somebody help me understand Nibbāna better? The only way to truly understand Nibbana is to experience it for oneself. Reading, writing, discussing, thinking and debating it will never, ever lead to an understanding of it. Nibbana can only be understood ...


-1

In short, death is a cessation of life force & many other things but it is not a cessation of the conditioned which is discerned to be changing as it persists, whereas nibbananirodha dhatu is a truth of that kind of cessation. "When this body lacks these three qualities — vitality, heat, & consciousness — it lies discarded & forsaken like a ...


7

Nibbana is cessation of delusion, cessation of ambition and greed, cessation of lacking, cessation of needing more, cessation of "everything is wrong", cessation of worrying about one's future, cessation of "i am better" and "i am worse", cessation of ego-centric hoping and fearing, cessation of taking reification of signs ...


0

Death is like cessation, isn't it -- dissolution, transformation -- whereas nibbana is the unborn and the undying.


0

No. Perception of death is usually the fear or terror of losing what one clings to, usually consciousness, form etc. At Savatthi. There the Blessed One said, "Monks, suppose there were a river, flowing down from the mountains, going far, its current swift, carrying everything with it, and — holding on to both banks — kasa grasses, kusa grasses, reeds, ...


0

The is no such as perception of ones death, once avijja is already uprooted, good householder. And to reach such, even perception of Nibbana has to be abounded.


2

Is a perception of death - a perception of cessation, then akin to a perception of nibbana? No, it's not - Nibbana is the only unconditioned Dhamma out of the Four Ultimate Realities (Rupa, Citta, Cetasika, Nibbana). Nibbana does not arise or cease and is not subject to the Three Marks of Existence, except the Third Mark: Anatta, which applies to both ...


0

persons transmigrate. nirvana is the cessation of that. that is not merely death.


0

AN 4.159 below explains this very topic and it's quite self-explanatory. Then Ven. Ananda approached the nun and, on arrival, sat down on a prepared seat. As he was sitting there, he said to the nun: "This body, sister, comes into being through food. And yet it is by relying on food that food is to be abandoned. "This body comes into being through ...


Top 50 recent answers are included