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10

From AN 9.34: Ven: Sariputta: “Reverends, extinguishment (Nibbana) is bliss! Ven. Udayi: “But Reverend Sāriputta, what’s blissful about it, since nothing is felt?” Ven. Sariputta: “The fact that nothing is felt is precisely what’s blissful about it. Sukha or happiness for an unenlightened person is experienced when encountering pleasant feelings (from the ...


6

Are you sure a black hole will destroy everything? Do you understand the world enough to determine what is best for other beings? Why did the Buddha declare the cosmos to be one of the four imponderables? How can you free something or somebody other than yourself as long as you're in shackles? I am sorry if this sounds harsh: Find the way of freedom from ...


5

the diminishing of the presence of tanha leads to the diminishing of the presence of dukkha... the extension of this principle... via inductive reasoning... applied all the way until complete eradication of dukkha... Let's reason logically: We know that everything in life of a sentient being can be subsumed under subjective experience. For a sentient being ...


5

Case 57 of the Blue Rock Collection I alone am holy Case A monastic said to Zhaozhou, "It is said, 'The Great Way is not difficult. It only abhors choice and attachment.' Now, what are nonchoice and nonattachment?" Zhaozhou said, "I alone am holy throughout heaven and earth." The monastic said, "It is still choice and attachment.&...


5

"I'm just trying to figure out how extinction can avoid the extremes of eternalism and annihilation." And therein lies your problem. If you are trying to figure it out, you are dealing in concepts, not nirvana. Every word you speak answers itself. It is a closed loop. A closed system. Step outside. How would you define a word without using ...


5

Good question. Nirvana/Nibbana is not a state of mind, rather it's a quality or an aspect that is always present regardless of any conditions, but even though it's always present it is not always seen. The state of being aware of the ever-present N is dependent on conditions while the N itself is not. You know this quality of mind that watches everything ...


5

the nirvana Gotama sought was a permanent nirvana. being without sin will not stop suffering from hunger, heat & cold, sickness, etc the only permanent nirvana is the complete eradication of self-view it is not easy to comprehend the hallucination of self-view, let alone discover self-view is suffering for example, the self-instinct of gotama was ...


4

The fully liberated ones (called arahants) do not experience any kind of mental suffering. They may experience physical pain which they endure and not suffer mentally from. They do not have latent tendencies (anusaya), defilements (kilesa), effluents (asava), fetters (samyojana), the five hindrances (pañca nīvaraṇāni), craving (tanha), clinging (upadana) and ...


4

I am studying MN19 this week and your post resonates with the Buddha's description of his own path to enlightenment. It begins with a very profound view: MN19:2.1: “Mendicants, before my awakening—when I was still unawakened but intent on awakening—I thought: ‘Why don’t I meditate by continually dividing my thoughts into two classes?’ So I assigned sensual, ...


4

Instinct (refer to AN 7.11). The Earth today has 7.7 billion people plus zillions of animals, insects, fish & other life forms. This whole Earth is created by lust & craving (refer to SN 12.44). Basically, each creature is born from reproduction for the purpose to further engage in reproduction. It goes on & on like this, endlessly for the ...


4

It's extremely difficult to let go of sensual enjoyment. Experiencing sensual enjoyment leads to clinging, meaning trying to experience even more sensual enjoyment. Hence, the masses have the natural tendency towards burning with sensual fever, rather than trying to escape it. It's a vicious cycle. From Magandiya Sutta: "Now suppose that there was a ...


3

Is nirvana a conceptual construction? For any / only some Buddhists Of course it'd depend on who you ask. To a deep-sea fish, the fresh breeze of the open sky will remain a conceptual construction, but to a man on land, that's something possible to have first-hand experience of. Similarly, Nibbana will remain a conceptual construction until one's attained ...


3

You're absolutely right that they are only superficially appearing similar, but when you dive deep, they are completely different. This has been discussed in numerous answers, which I will not repeat here - this answer, this answer, this answer, this answer, this answer. The original teachings of the Buddha are systematic (the four noble truths), empirical (...


3

It’s almost funny (in a darkly humoristic way) that we who call ourselves “wise humans” (Homo Sapiens) can never see the one guaranteed way to put an end to our troubled and selfish behaviors—change our way of being. We always seem to take for granted that humans will always act in negative, selfish ways that harms everyone and everything around them. There ...


3

The four stages are not related to "reflexively respond forcefully to never allow it to arise again and give rise to suffering". To volitionally not allow defilements to arise is called 'mindfulness & clear comprehension' and also 'sense restraint', as follows: Thus associating with good persons, becoming full, fills up hearing the good Dhamma....


3

Nirvana is not a state of mind but is an element the transcendental mind has sense contact with. As for "transcendental" mind, the Pali is "lokuttara"; which literally means "above/beyond the world". Thus you should train yourselves: 'We will listen when discourses that are words of the Tathagata — deep, deep in their meaning, ...


3

From AN 9.34: Ven: Sariputta: “Reverends, extinguishment (Nibbana) is bliss! Ven. Udayi: “But Reverend Sāriputta, what’s blissful about it, since nothing is felt?” Ven. Sariputta: “The fact that nothing is felt is precisely what’s blissful about it. Sukha or happiness for an unenlightened person is experienced when encountering pleasant feelings (from the ...


2

Good householder, Without life, a good birth, how could, would one practice the path out. As the lokuttara-depending co-arising counts: birth/stand/life(jati) is condition for Dukkha, Dukkha reason for Saddha (conviction),... liberation. So "gati, gati, paragati, parasamgati Bodhisvaha", good housholder. Getting better, better, over-good becoming, ...


2

Being enlightened as ''having love and compassion'' is from the people who cling to the dichotomy hate-love. They heard that Being enlightened means having no hate, so they think that Being enlightened means being full of love. More generally this stems from their lack of understanding that four Brahma Vihara or four sublime states [ metta (loving kindness), ...


2

If you have come to Buddhism out of a desire to no longer suffer, that desire itself may lead to more suffering for you, if you do not succeed, for whatever reason. Buddhism provides ways to end your own suffering, but not by developing an aversion to life, but rather, by training your mind so that you do not crave things you do not have, nor desire things ...


2

First, something to contemplate: Modern Science, as a human endeavor, is based upon the idea known as Verificationism. This states that only facts verified through empirical evidence—based ultimately on our senses and their modern technological adjuncts—can be considered to be true. Everything else, including ideas coming from metaphysics and religion, are ...


2

When the eightfold path arise together in one moment, there is no doubt like that anymore. You can say you are doing the best every time, but it isn't real. You just can't see the better which you can do, so you decide you are doing the best. As you have known from the scientist that you need to analysis every thing as the smallest elements, eg. molecule, ...


2

When we practice by sitting in meditation, we will (in a fairly short time) reach a state where tanhā and dukkha 'spontaneously' disappear, if only for a moment or two. I'm not even talking about a true satori experience. I just mean a moment where the waters of the mind grow calm and still — where we are not doing or thinking anything, because there's ...


2

Nirvana is the goal of the Buddhist path. The literal meaning of the term is "blowing out" or "quenching". Nirvana is the ultimate spiritual goal in Buddhism. What Does It Feel Like to Be in Nirvana? Why, I'm glad you ask... just kidding. I wonder how likely it'd be for someone who already attained Nibbana to hang out at online Buddhist ...


2

According to AN 6.87, there is actually a list of characteristics, and such a person will never be able to have the right mental state or moral capacity to learn the Dhamma: "Endowed with these six qualities, a person is incapable of alighting on the lawfulness, the rightness of skillful mental qualities even when listening to the true Dhamma. Which ...


2

Practice unfolds according to view. When a practitioner declares, "this works!" or "this does not work!" there is always context to be considered. What was the original individual view? The Buddha himself pointed this out regarding the practice of serenity and discernment: AN4.94:2.1: As for the person who has serenity but not ...


2

It depends on the company you keep. Associate with people who focus on the holy life, and that will become your focus too. From SN 45.2: Thus have I heard. On one occasion the Blessed One was dwelling among the Sakyans where there was a town of the Sakyans named Nagaraka. Then the Venerable Ānanda approached the Blessed One. Having approached, he paid ...


2

Heartwood Sutta is one of the many suttas that paint the overall Path in broad strokes. We use these suttas to understand the elements of the Path from their relations to each other. In this case the point of the sutta is to drive home the last step of the Path, cetto-vimukti, i.e. "liberation of mind" (or heart) as the only reliable differentiator ...


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