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15

Craving is when the baby reaches with desire for the pacifier and clinging is when the baby has the pacifier and won't let it go. To distinguish craving from clinging, Buddhaghosa uses the following metaphor in this source: "Craving is the aspiring to an object that one has not yet reached, like a thief's stretching out his hand in the dark; clinging ...


7

Repeated craving becomes clinging. Another name for clinging is attachment. Craving: 3 Types of craving: Sensual craving Craving to be Craving not to be Attachment: Once attachment forms it's painful to sever. We protect our object of attachment. We like to be with our object of attachment. We pine when we are apart from our object of attachment. ...


5

Bhava-chakra, the wheel of life, or, as I would translate it, "the wheel of individuation" is a relatively late depiction of the 12 Nidanas. In the suttas of Pali Canon, the nidanas are usually presented as a list, that is reviewed both in forward as well as in reverse direction -- but never (to my knowledge!) as an infinite loop. If you read the wheel ...


4

Here is an answer that is based on my study and meditation. It is not citing any official sources and trying to stay away from technical explanation in favor of real-life examples. -- What is the difference between Tanha and Upadana? To use a traditional example. Say you met a very nice person. Let's say that person had a beautiful smile and sweet soft ...


4

Patisandhi Citta is the starting point of life. So life begins at conception. Rebirth Consciousness This is called pa.tisandhi citta, literally "relinking consciousness." The pa.tisandhi citta is the act of consciousness which arises at the first moment of life, the moment of conception. It is determined by the last kammic citta of the preceding ...


4

There's no single accepted one-lifetime interpretation of pratityasamutpada in modern Buddhism. There have been multiple attempts to come up with such an explanation though. 1) A decent summary of this question and the various approaches to it is Dhivan Thomas Jones' "New Light On The Twelve Nidanas", published in Contemporary Buddhism journal in 2009. ...


3

I think the passage you're asking about (in the Access to Insight translation of DN 15) is this: "'From becoming as a requisite condition comes birth.' Thus it has been said. And this is the way to understand how from becoming as a requisite condition comes birth. If there were no becoming at all, in any way, of anything anywhere — i.e., sensual becoming, ...


3

Here's a quote from a description of Tibetan embryology, Life and body begin their development right after the conception in the mother's womb, where the five basic and subtle elements start to be transformed into the physical body. According to the conception theory, the Bardo consciousness and the two parents are brought together by the emotion of the ...


3

All factors of the pratityasamutpada occurs in this lifetime. Just from different causal rounds of it. And of course, there is much more relations between the nidanas than just sequential enumeration of 12 states. Or are the concepts of the nidanas so bound up with rebirth that they have no value or sense to practioners who are more agnostic about this. ...


3

The nidanas are described in SN 12.2. Here vinnana is 6-fold sense-consciousness, which is the stock description in the suttas. https://suttacentral.net/sn12.2/en/bodhi


2

DO starts with Depending on Ignorance, mental volition arise, depending on volitions consciousness arise, depending on consciousness, name & form, depending on name & form 6 sense base, depending on 6 sense base contact..etc.. It is commonly accepted (?) that the re-birth linking consciousness(patisandhi) descends into the foetus around 6 months. ...


2

It is taught by some teachers (if not many) the chain of dependent origination is divided into 3 lifetimes: past, present, and future. However, because each part describes a single lifetime, I think each part is simply one of 3 ways we can look at our present experience. We can see our present experience in the sense that our ignorance gives rise to ...


2

I am answering from the Theravada standpoint. (hoping this also will add some value) Death is: breaking of the aggregates due to decay or some accident, end of sustainable life span Rebirth: reformation of the aggregates As long as the wheel of dhamma is turning, each time the aggregates breakup in one body it forms in another and rebirth. Even in this ...


2

If we look at Robert and rewind time backwards to the time when Robert has not yet come into his first birth, can't we see how Robert came into his first birth? There is no first birth. Samsara is beginningless. But you can end it. Robert is a concept. There's no Robert existing in reality even from this moment to the next, let alone from life to life.


2

After understanding this answer, you will realize there are a lot of sutta, which explaining 3 Taṇhā with 4 Upādāna. You can use this explanation in everywhere of Tipiṭaka, i.e. brahmajālasutta because the sutta I linked below is just the example. What is the difference between Tanha and Upadana? Taṇhā is beginning-lobha, Upādāna is often-arising-lobha ...


2

The best survey of suttas on Twelve Nidanas that I have seen can be found in "The Fundamental Teachings of Early Buddhism: A comparative study based on the Sutranga portion of the Pali Samyutta-Nikaya and the Chinese Samyuktagama" by Choong Mun-keat.


2

will dependent origination cease to exist if one doesn't have 12 nidanas? I think it's a description of how mental conditions originate -- for example, the origination of feelings depend on contact, the origination of craving depends on feelings, etc. I think it is meant to be possible to stop (arrest) this "wheel of becoming" -- and that a place (on the ...


2

will dependent origination cease to exist if one doesn't have 12 nidanas? In Buddhism, what should be uprooted is Ignorance (Avidyā, Avijja) which is the first nidana in dependent origin. This results to cease the other 11 nidanas in dependent origin. And in general, how does one know that all dependent originations of a thing are "depleted"? When ...


1

Good question. The way it was explained to me, the twelve nidanas are all "made" from each other, they are all made from the same "stuff". It's like when there is water, the wave on the water and the foam on top of the wave - they all "grow" from one another. Similarly, consciousness is "made from" mental formations and feelings/perceptions "grow from" ...


1

There's an entire samyutta on the Nidanas in the Connected Discourses: https://suttacentral.net/sn12


1

Ven. Buddhaghosa himself has said in his book THE PATH OF PURIFICATION (VISUDDHIMAGGA) that 'one's own opinion is the weakest authority of all and should only be accepted if it accords with the Suttas' (DA. 567-68). So far I have not come across such an explanation in the Suttas. So until I come across such an explanation in the Scriptures (Sutta-Vinaya), I’...


1

When you ponder, weigh, and compare the teachings of the Buddha, you have to base it on adopting the right attitude and asking the right questions about them. AN 2.25 points out that some of the teachings are meant to have their meaning inferred, whereas others are not. Only a Stream Entrant will be able to see this difference. So you and I have a way to go. ...


1

Unlike an Arahant, who is a disciple 'perfected in training’, whenever we perceive something through the senses our consciousness decides to either take it negatively or positively. If the response is negative we refuse it. That is revulsion. And if the response is positive we grasp it as our own. That is attachment. The great Arahants (disciples who ...


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