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I think we should differentiate Buddhism from New Age movements, they may share some goals (happiness), some tools (meditation) and some teachings, however they are very different in some key aspects, usually the ones related to money, intoxocants, sexuality and "enjoying life" (generally speaking) There are new age gurus and teachers trying to reconcile ...


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See the links dependent origination more particularly: With Contact as condition, Feeling arises With Feeling as condition, Craving arises With Craving as condition, Clinging arises So attraction happens when you get a feeling to which you analyze and give an evaluation as good and bad followed by clinging to it. At the sub conscious level this is happening ...


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Law of attraction seems to create and stimulate attachments, people crave for things and think about them constantly, concentrating the mind on different desires, in that sense I think it is hard to mix it with Buddhism, because in Buddhism we try to let go of attachments instead of trying to fulfill the desires. In Buddhism you learn that you don't put an ...


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The Law of Attraction seems to take certain Buddhist teachings out of context in order to make worldly life more comfortable. In Buddhism, especially in Mahayana and Vajrayana, there are teachings on illusory or dream-like nature of our everyday experiences. Everything that happens to us takes place essentially in our mind as outside of the mind there are ...


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My understanding of the Law of Attraction is that it is a way to affect what happens to you by thinking about what you want to have happen. If you want to receive money; you think about receiving money. In Buddhism, the goal is to understand reality as it is. Understanding reality as it is, involves accepting reality as it is. Manipulating circumstances to ...


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I know more about Buddhism than new age, but I'll take a stab and listing the contrasts: New age is radically eclectic and blends all sorts of religions and para-religious concepts. New age has a very porous boundary. Buddhism is syncretic-- it picks up new ideas as it moves into a new cultural area, but then becomes institutionalized again an one ...


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Why does good householder Ilya, so long and often wisely involved, as such a fullish question, actually knowing for her self? Why would on join a "Tathagata-form" at first place, if perceiving him as common? Everybody, seeing the Dhamma could see the Tathagata, and in as far every not blind person could reach same "Tathagata-hood", once ...


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It is not personification. There is evidence that Gotama Buddha exists in India. He is special so he was called Samma Sambuddha. ================ when the Buddha is designated a sammā Sambuddha, "a perfectly enlightened one," this highlights not only the fullness of his enlightenment but his authority and reliability as a spiritual teacher. https://...


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You may in fact be asking about "identity view", which is a key concept in the suttas: For a little baby doesn’t even have a concept of ‘identity’, so how could identity view possibly arise in them? --MN64 With identity view (i.e., "I am") comes a host of problems. Indeed, you might say that we get a "universe of suffering". MN64 discusses identity view ...


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The Buddha attains the Truth through cessation of reification. Reification is an important concept in (modern) Mahayana Buddhism. It refers to (samsaric) mind's tendency to assume something to be concrete and solid when in fact it's not. Reification is the opposite of the correct vision of Shunyata - the non-concrete nature of all phenomena. Most if not ...


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I think that both these questions depend on the meaning of the word "reify". I guess you understand "reify" to mean "say that something is real when it isn't" -- and so you dislike nidanas being described as reifications (but maybe you'd disagree with putting words into your mouth like that). IMO "to reify" means to perceive an activity or verb as an ...


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A few comments on Dhammadhatu's excellent answer, for now mostly pertaining to "Is Buddhism a religion?" and "Does Buddhism answer important questions? First, it is correct to say that Buddhism is not a religion. However, I believe that It is absolutely not the case that Buddhists are atheists. It is probably not the case that Buddhists are agnostics in ...


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Artist Buddha? The Buddha denounces individual expression and passion in favor of being grounded in peace and happiness. How to get to Nirvana? Follow the Buddha's Eightfold Path to cultivate an ability to let go of everything you want to pull to you(greed, clinging, desire) and develop acceptance of reality you normally push away(anger, aversion). ...


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I think there is no conflict between law of attraction and buddhism. But as per my understanding what buddha says is as long as you need something you will be born (and in the process you may get it). So there you go law of attraction. But in the process you will get lot more happenings (bad and good things) just being in the sansara. Therefor buddhism says ...


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