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In Vajrayana every practice is done on 3 levels - on the level of body, speech and mind. We work with the mind through visualising the Buddha forms, the speech centre is exercised through mantra repetitions and the body - through keeping the posture, using prayer beads (mala) and through the use of mudras. As a Vajrayana practitioner I can think of a few ...


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Yes and no. Certain hand gestures cause better energy flow through your body and vibrations. These vibration can be some times an aid in dissolving pain and also fabrication. If you get attached to the vibrations and gestures this will do more harm than good in your progress. So my advice is do not bother too much about these as their contribution to your ...


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If I can give an answer with reference to 5 Buddha mandala as I think it draws together the iconography into a satisfying whole. As it's name suggests the 5 Buddha mandala 5 Buddhas at each compass point with one at the center. Each Buddha displays their own mudra. Each mudra points to a quality of that Buddha and thus to a quality of the enlightenment ...


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According to Dr. Robert Thurman: The mudra “is a sacred gesture symbolically expressing inner wisdom, or, in tantra, a female consort for yogic practices that harness sexual energies to the path. Some of the main gestures we see in Tibetan images are abhaya, the gesture of fearlessness, the right hand held in from with open palm raised up: dana, ...


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Since this question has sat for 3 weeks without anyone attempting an answer, I will try to add something that may perhaps point the questioner in a good direction. Mudras seem to be used mainly by the monastic and professional (dance, art, etc.) communities to convey symbolic messages to the Buddhas and those participating in or viewing the ceremony (...


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From my reading of around 40 suttas that mentioned Anapanasati, Buddha never mentioned about where to place your hands or arms. However, in those suttas, he mentioned sitting down crossed legs in quiet place (forest, under a tree, empty house (room) etc. he didnt even mention that you have to close your eyes. then place your attention to the present and ...


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That's chi, not wu wei. Wu wei is more of an approach - one that can give rise to feelings of chi, aid in samatha meditation, etc. Using chi is outside the scope of Buddhist practice, although Jwing-Ming Yang mentions its role in Buddhism in many of his qigong books. Personally, I appreciate his effort, but his writings on the subject seem like a bit of a ...


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This answer is only from the Theravada viewpoint. It's likely that you can find more diverse meditation techniques in Vajrayana. Shambhavi Mudra is apparently an eyebrow center gazing gesture. This source states: Shambhavi Mudra is an eye-crossing technique which is used as a hack to activate the parasympathetic nervous system—which is cognate with the ...


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Perhaps there's one called the shramanamudrâ (see also Śramaṇa).


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Because it was on this earth he cultivated the ten Paramithas in 3 different ways. He was training his generals(Dana, Sila, Nekkhamma etc.) for eons for the final battle against the evil one. It wasn't a plea, he was making the ultimate statement, saying that he needs no other witness when the great earth itself has witnessed it all. perhaps the only ...


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Short Answer: It doesn't matter. Long Answer Some postures are said to be more conducive to concentration, and perhaps this is true to a certain extent. Perhaps there is something with certain hand placements which may help keep people a bit more focused (maybe the bare attention required to keep fingers barely touching, for instance). However, don't make ...


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In traditions such as Zen, holding the hands in a mudra position is another way of directing mindfulness to the body, just as is having the legs, arms, torso, etc in proper alignment. Other traditions emphasize complete relaxation of the body, and the hands are just kept resting loosely. It is true that meditation is about what goes on between your ears, not ...


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When meditating I was taught to hold my hands in the cosmic mudra as shown below. It's used as a comfortable position to hold one's hands during meditation. The thumbs should be touching but not pressing. Also it's indicative of the mental states encountered during meditation. If the thumbs have become pressed tightly together then the meditator is probably ...


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