11

I agree with Dhammadhatu in that the different meditations seem confusing when you don't know what it is all about. When you know the underlying principle, you know how these different meditations actually approach same thing from slightly different angle, and you see how they try to explain something that is hard to explain in words, and emphasize what ...


8

It appears unclear to you because you have not comprehended the essence of the Buddha's teachings. The Buddha did not teach any 'techniques'. The Buddha taught to abandon craving & other unwholesome mental states. When the mind is as pure as it can relatively be, it will automatically 'meditate' upon subtle internal object, such as breathing & ...


7

Meditation and the Noble Eightfold Path is necessary for Buddhist enlightenment but it is not a compulsory practise for Buddhist lay people (non-monks). The Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta) says: There are these two extremes that are not to be indulged in by one who has gone forth [from the household life]. Which two? That which is devoted to sensual ...


7

OP: S.N. Goenka says if you practice Vipassana, you must not practice any other technique (but, even more confusingly, he also teaches Anapana and Metta) What is said by Goenka is that you should choose one technique and stick to it. If you choose the technique he teachers you have to follow the instructions properly without adding or subtracting or mixing ...


5

Not sure about "experienced monk", but from my own perspective: This question assumes the mind is single-threaded, that it thinks about one thing at a time. So, in this question's assumed framework, the mind can either "wander" from point to point or "stay" on one point, correct? - Which is not at all what happens as you gain experience in meditation. ...


5

"Law of attraction" is, by its meaning, total Dhamma and all works on that. It's the "law of attraction" that keeps one in the wheel, and that of escape, with faith into liberation as alternative attraction. For one once attrated by what is worthy to give in, one has already designed ones deliverance. Without such as right imaging not much success, yes. ...


5

It sounds like "equanimity", which is a normal result of meditation.


4

Is there any information in Buddhism on mundane mental contemplation (if any)? Is there a benefit for un-concentrated contemplation on a virtuous topic? Mental contemplation can be useful for training in Morality, but not for training in Concentration or Wisdom. It is good to contemplate your current karmic state, and deduce what actions can be taken or ...


4

Concentration is a poor translation of samadhi. Samadhi means meditative state. And right samadhi is one with strong mindful awareness. Deep samadhi is a state of absorption into the meditation object. There are also characteristic states of samadhi called jhanas which generally implies prominence of a particular mental quality (physical pleasure, mental ...


4

My teacher said, the key difference between those Buddhists that only speculate based on the theories they read in books, and those Buddhists that actually know what they are talking about, is meditation.


4

RE: "I don't even know what I'm supposed to do during meditation" & "what's causing the bliss?" - Congrats, you are very clear about what it is that you're not clear about. That's an awesome first step. The human mind is an information machine. When you set a goal X and you attain X, we get "X = X" and that feels good. When you set a goal of X and you ...


4

Brahmaviharas is a lower type of meditation than Anapanasati. In Brahmaviharas you use your intellect, to make up suggestions or narratives, that condition your point of view a certain way. In Anapanasati you don't use your intellect to generate anything, you just let go of hangups and let them dissolve. Anapanasati is more direct. The Buddha said, we don't ...


4

There are really just two aspects of meditations in Buddhism, as seen in Kimsuka Sutta: "Suppose, monk, that there were a royal frontier fortress with strong walls & ramparts and six gates. In it would be a wise, experienced, intelligent gatekeeper to keep out those he didn't know and to let in those he did. A swift pair of messengers, coming ...


4

One should associate with true friends and disassociate with false friends. One should associate with those are: (1) He is pleasant [loving]. piyo ca hoti (2) He is agreeable. manāpo ca (3) He is respectful. garu ca (4) He is worthy of respect. bhāvanīyo ca (5) He admonishes, patient when admonished. vattā ca vacana-k,khamo ca (6)...


3

I have not heard of any teacher in any tradition that would say: "Yes, go ahead and shop around, get the best elements from every tradition and construct a teaching and practice that works for you" -- Never. Every teacher seems to have confidence in their tradition. That said, some of the teachers I personally came in contact with, stayed fairly hands off ...


3

From AN3.63: With the giving up of pleasure and pain, and the ending of former happiness and sadness, I enter and remain in the fourth absorption, without pleasure or pain, with pure equanimity and mindfulness. When I’m practicing like this, if I walk meditation, at that time I walk like the gods. When I’m practicing like this, if I stand, at ...


3

Buddha taught that one should develop compassion or karuna both with actions and meditation. This can be seen in Mettanisamsa Sutta: "Monks, for one whose awareness-release through good will is cultivated, developed, pursued, handed the reins and taken as a basis, given a grounding, steadied, consolidated, and well-undertaken, eleven benefits can be ...


3

Stillness. Whereas the other elements are also beneficial, sitting is about reaching the pinnacle of stillness. The methodology is very simple, because it's mostly one of letting go. Caveat: it always seems dubious until it proves it's efficacy, and then doubt is removed.


3

What Buddha recommended was the right concentration (Samma Samadhi) a part of Noble Eightfold Path. Wrong concentration (Mitya Samadhi) may be harmful.


3

One possible answer is that meditation relies both on the theoretical understanding on what's going on, but also the direct experience. They are mutually dependent as far as i can see. A mere theoretical understanding of meditation will not take us very far in the progress, just like meditation without a theoretical description of the phenomena involved ...


3

Simple analogy: The experience of watching someone drive (a car) for 1000 years can never compare to actually driving by yourself for 1 hour.


3

Welcome to Buddhism.SE. I'm not sure what the current policy is on these sorts of questions, but considering how powerful the mind is, seeking help in a forum like this might be problematic. while trying to concentrate I feel this weird shiver in my eyelids and whole skull area and a weird heaviness in my body? I'm guessing the question mark is a way ...


3

Right concentration is a factor that arises out of it's causes and not something that is pulled out or in. The path develops based on right view and right concentration is of course a part of the way to liberation. But it's of no use to pull in, put out effort right there. Therefore one with confidence focuses on right effort to straighten right view and ...


3

Yes, it is if the layperson is aiming for awakening in this very life. Two of the factors of the eightfold path directly correspond to meditation - sati and samadhi. Is the practice of Buddhism incomplete without meditation? This might be a controversial answer, but yes. It is. Except for those who are born with immense conscious bandwidth, stable ...


3

The law of attraction as you describe it sounds like it could be misunderstood: Imagining "being praised as a famous pianist" won't make a person famous, nor a pianist But imagining doing something e.g. playing the piano -- visualising mentally exactly what to do and how it feels to play, rehearsing difficult sequences even when you're not at the piano -- ...


3

As ChrisW said, this is a known vajrayana practice, congratulations on inventing it by yourself. It's called "generation-stage meditation", you can google it for more details.


3

In Buddhism, Nibbana refers to liberation from suffering (dukkha). It is also referred to as the highest bliss (nibbanam paramam sukham) in Dhp 204. The word sukha is translated in this context as bliss, but in other contexts, also as happiness. Boredom is a type of suffering. An enlightened person is free from this type of suffering too. We have 3 types ...


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