6

This is like with children playing doctor: most of the imitation activity they can come up with is going to be harmless, but if they get their hands on real medications and start actually taking them at random, then they can get into real trouble. Similarly with Tantra, as long as all you do is mindlessly repeat some mantras and get a tattoo of a wrathful ...


5

This is more like a general comment than an on-point answer... You know why you're having this problem? Because visualization is a kind of fabrication. You're creating the experience, assembling it from the elements (signs) available in your memory. As you fabricate the seen you're trying to fabricate the seer and are struggling at that. Which is kind of ...


5

+1 to Andrei's answer. I'd like to add just one thing, which is that yes, it is hard to find someone to play the role of the guru for tantric practice. In America in particular, there's a tendency for ordinary people to fall into one of two extremes: extreme independence, individualism, and mistrust of spiritual authority; or, when one encounters a "guru" ...


4

When in meditation, you will pass through different psychic experiences. Here are some points: I would suggest trying meditating on a chair so that your feet are on the ground. If you feel panic or excitement rising, feel the soles of your feet. This will help you get grounded. Feel the sensation on different parts of your body. Learn to rest in the ...


4

It is a well known super power attained by advanced meditators. You can find references to such powers in the stories of the Buddha, and in biographies of well known monks. Kevatta Sutta: "Kevatta, there are these three miracles that I have declared, having directly known and realized them for myself. Which three? The miracle of psychic power, the ...


3

1) Ultimately, the "core" of Tibetan Buddhism is the Mahamudra system of practises, where they also include the Samatha and Vipassana systems/methods as described in the Theravada texts. The practise of visualizing "Buddha on a levitating throne flanked by snow lions" (paraphrase) is an overly-promoted for-absolute-beginner entry practise mainly because it ...


3

I'm familiar with visualization meditation, in the context of Tibetan Buddhist meditation. Those specific meditations were good for my mood as well as a training in concentration. For me it was a very useful start into meditation, though I have stopped doing it for now. I think it's a mistake to avoid something you're good at, just because you heard that ...


3

It depends on the system. In the sutra system, there are analytical meditations involving visualizing the form of the body of the Buddha, for instance. You do this in order to achieve calm abiding on the mental image of the form of the body of the Buddha. It is very much practiced in Tibetan traditions, since it is said that the object (that mental image) ...


3

I've had similar experiences. Though Buddhism doesn't directly talk about the Kundalini system or even use the terminology (though Tibetan Vajrayana Buddhism has something close or maybe the same in Thummo), reading about it was useful from a systemic analysis perspective. Regardless of any explanation I found, it was ultimately only for curiosity ...


3

What you experience during your practice is absolutely not harmful. It is a stage in the meditation process. More: it is a sign that you proceed in the right direction. The vibrating 'light' that arises and passes away is the so-called nimitta. Catherine, Shaila, (2008) Focused and Fearless. A Meditator’s Guide to States of Deep Joy, Calm, and Clarity p. ...


2

This depends somewhat on how you define "scripture." It's important to emphasize that "scripture" to a Buddhist doesn't necessarily mean the same thing as "scripture" to a Protestant Christian, despite the similar language. As Rabbit references there is a document titled the Six Yogas of Nāropa (ན་རོ་ཆོས་དྲུག་, Narö chö druk). Naropa himself was no small ...


2

My answer does not rely on scriptures. I am a practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism too, doing Ngöndrö, so I have to visualize a lot. In fact visualisation "repels" me first from Tibetan Buddhism (I was in Zen a long time.) Now I value it: 1.) Visualisation strengthen your concentration. It does not exclude breathing meditation. Both are strengthening each ...


2

It's possible to move the attention eye (inner eye) around and through the body without moving the eyes, and if you get good at it, maybe you can read the print on a newspaper several yojanas away. Also, what you seem to perceive as trouble trying to conceptualize a body - in which your confusion centres around location, distance and space - could actually ...


1

There are meditations which do not involve any kind of visualizations at all, and I would encourage you to try those for a change. For example, look for Vipassana meditation, which fabricates nothing, and asks you to do absolutely nothing, but just to notice what is there. You have probably heard of it even if you are not already aware of the name - it's the ...


1

I am not entirely sure about this, but my understanding is that what you are calling abstract thinking is just regular conceptualization as a way of knowing. Training in visualization is necessary to facilitate practice in direct mental perception rather than just conceptualization. In my experience, cravings and worry arise all the time with ...


1

I believe Tibetan Vajrayana lays more emphasis on visualization as against abstract thinking, as a means towards final liberation. Recommend utube discourses by Professor Robert Thurman and Lama Govinda's classic 'Foundations of Tibetan Mysticism' for starters. Its likely to be a long haul.


1

My meditation technique is that of closing my eyes and focusing on the sensation of the breath as it passes in and out of my throat. What kind of meditation are you doing.Samatha or vippassana?If it's samatha just keep focusing on the physical sensation of the breath.If it's vippassanna just keep noting. I saw swirling lights in the darkness of my closed ...


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