16

As it was explained to me, the purpose is rather mundane. During some kinds of meditation, esp. when one penetrates lower chakras, there is lots of saliva generated, swallowing which can be quite a distraction and interfere with abdominal breathing. Raising the tongue makes most of saliva flow back into the throat instead of filling the mouth. P.S. in a ...


9

I've heard Ajahn Brahm tell this story during a lecture which was recorded on YouTube, so I can confirm it's definitely told by him; however I don't remember which one it was. The story is not (strictly) in the suttas. It is probably (very loosely) based on AN 6.42, and deals more with the disturbances of nearby lay life as opposed to the wilderness. Nagita,...


8

Yes but it's easier to fall asleep that way. The four official positions are: Sitting, walking, laying and standing but really we can meditate no matter what position we are in. When we set our bodies in one of these four positions, away from noise and distractions it is like we are making a little laboratory of our mind and bodies or a little retreat ...


8

Well, here is a coincidence. I just happened to start reading Mahasi Sayadaw's "Practical Vipassana Exercises" and he explicitly mentions swaying: Should you intend to sway the body, then knowingly note intending. While in the act of swaying, swaying. When contemplating you may actually discover the body swaying back and forth. Do not be alarmed; neither ...


6

There's a line in the Ariyapariyesana Sutta which I think implies he "did normal things" as well as meditating: Ariyapariyesana Sutta: The Noble Search "In search of what might be skillful, seeking the unexcelled state of sublime peace, I wandered by stages in the Magadhan country and came to the military town of Uruvela. There I saw some ...


5

Maybe the desire to adhere to a particular meditation posture is the problem. If someone got it into their head that to meditate properly, one needed to hold a headstand position, then there's sure to be lots of discomfort to get in the way of the meditation. The purpose of the posture is to reduce bad mental qualities that get in the way of meditation, ...


4

Yoga is very helpful, especially aspects that deal with opening the hips and stretching the legs. It is best not to force it or you could hurt the body. A cushion or zafu under the tail bone and buttocks can elevate the body sufficiently so crosslegged is more comfortable. Some people sit Japanese style with legs folded under sitting on your heels and or ...


4

First of all I think it is important to remember that in the Mahasi Sayadaw system of meditation, you don't necessarily have to note distractions. When distractions arise you have a choice between staying with the primary object (e.g. the movement of the abdomen) or you can take up the distraction itself as an object. Both of these are equally valid. If the ...


4

I hunted down a reference to the lotus posture in the Satipatthana Sutta where it is stated in passing, as a matter of fact; so it is likely the lotus posture was one of those very obvious things to Indian yogis of the time that doesn't need much specific mention. Nisidati pallankam abhujitva ujum kayam panidhaya parimukham satim upatthapetva so satova ...


4

Sorry for being something of a jerk , man. I just had one of those days :p so to actually answer your question, it does depend on which tradition we're talking about. I know some (all?) traditions within Tibetan Buddhism teach yoga/stretches, these kind of things. Within the Theravada, stretching, yoga, exercise in general is not considered part of the ...


3

Yes and no. Certain hand gestures cause better energy flow through your body and vibrations. These vibration can be some times an aid in dissolving pain and also fabrication. If you get attached to the vibrations and gestures this will do more harm than good in your progress. So my advice is do not bother too much about these as their contribution to your ...


3

here I can answer as a sporter ;) Your problem is twofold: Your range of motion is limited, and your core is not strong enough To address 1. you can do stretching, common gymnastics stretching: Guide to basic stretching. Yoga is also a good option but I consider common stretching more to the point (and you will need that for yoga too, anyway). For 2. ...


3

One can meditate in any posture, but meditating lying down can be challenging because it is easy to fall asleep. Andrea Fella sometimes has to meditate lying down due to back pain while sitting; to keep from falling asleep, she holds one arm up in the air.


3

Attached is a non-exhaustive chart of traditional sitting postures for meditation. (There are others.) In the early Buddhist text suttas, the Buddha recommended meditation while sitting, walking, or lying down. While various teachers have emphasized or de emphasized the importance of posture (especially spine alignment, or comfortability to maintain for ...


3

I was being told that we don't practice to become experts on sitting. So if you have intense pain, go the middle way. Acknowledge pain, acknowledge that you want to move, try to overcome the pain a bit, acknowledge unbearable, and after a few moments, if necessary, move the body mindfully (not automatically, in reaction), and carry on particing, again in ...


3

In Zen meditation, posture is important. This is what I was taught. One sits on a zafu placed on a zabuton as below. It's important that the hips be elevated above the knees. The spine is erect (imagine a string coming through the top of your head and pulling you upward) and the pelvis is tilted forward slightly. The knees form the stable base to support the ...


3

Ven. Ananda’s realization of emancipation happened when he was neither walking, standing, sitting or lying down. Ven. Ananda was doing the walking meditation at that time. It is interesting to note that meditation could be practiced employing any of the four bodily postures, and he never got out of his 'walking meditation.. For emancipation one has to ...


2

The technique is not peculiar to Tibetian Buddhism, it's also used in Zen practice -- How To Practice Zen Meditation? says, Head And Neck Whatever the position you choose to adopt, make sure that your back and neck stay as straight as possible. Pull your chin in a little to erect the neck and try to “push the sky” with the top of your head. Do not be ...


2

What is the purpose of touching the tongue to the roof of the mouth when meditating ‘Suppose, with my teeth clenched and my tongue pressed against my palate, I beat down, hold back, and crush the mind with mind.’ So, with my teeth clenched and my tongue pressed against my palate, I beat down, held back, crushed the mind with mind. While I did so, ...


2

What I learned at a Vipassana meditation retreat: we were instructed to meditate for at least an hour without moving. The pain does get intense but you simply watch it happen. It ebbs and flows and insight can come from realizing that it is temporary. You can allow it to happen and be with it and it will go away. Seriously. What I was amazed to find out was ...


2

The position is something that your should choose to help in meditation, i.e., being able to be in the position for a long time without issue. Dwelling too much on what is the right posture is leaving the main task at hand and concentrating on auxiliary tasks. The danger in this is that this can lead to trying rights or ritual like practices which has been ...


2

This sort of rocking is most likely a defence mechanism; if you are consciously instigating it, then it is simply a reaction to the unpleasant stimuli. Unfortunately, it will therefore be a cause for increased aversion to the stimuli in question; you'll become more and more averse to pain as a result of your practice, which is really the opposite of the goal ...


2

Our Bodhisatva / Buddha had very high levels of Samadhi hence he could have stayed many days without moving of doing anything else. Deep Samadhi brings down your metabolism so you can stay for long periods without food, water or air. There might have been times when he would have done it in one sitting and sometimes may had have gone for alms as per @ChrisW ...


2

Based on your list of details, I can share some of your experiences. I meditate in Burmese position, I get pain in my mid-to-lower back, and I also have poor posture in general. So here are some suggestions: Hard Carpet My preference is to meditate on a hard carpet and you might also find it beneficial. Cushions and thick carpets can both throw off our ...


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