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Welcome to the community! Before answering your question, I believe some clarification would be helpful. As the user Buddhism pointed out, specific breathing exercises are more related to other ascetic practices of ancient India. One important component of the Buddha’s discovery of the path to awakening, is the leaving aside of exercises such as these. What ...


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Please see this answer for adaptation of Buddhist mindfulness into medical therapies called Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT). Those therapies are not Buddhist (as in their goals are not the goals of Buddhism), but they are based on Buddhist practices. If stress, depression and anxiety impede academic ...


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The Buddha discusses mindfulness of breathing here: MN118:15.1: Mendicants, when mindfulness of breathing is developed and cultivated it is very fruitful and beneficial. Find a comfortable, quiet place: MN118:16.1: And how is mindfulness of breathing developed and cultivated to be very fruitful and beneficial? MN118:17.1: It’s when a mendicant has gone to ...


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Be patient with yourself, the energy is essentially how you feel the body from within. Initially when your body feels stiff, i.e also energy but blocked. Slowly, the energies you feel would be subtle. Try listening to the talks titled Breath, on dhammatalks.org, he explains it quite deeply there.


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Assumimg good technique, in order to get a relaxation response, you're looking at about 15 to 25 minutes. Once you pass that, you're meditation session can be said to truly begin. This can be relaxing, but it also can bring up psychological and other unaddressed issues as the flurry of your day in no longer keeping them suppressed. Sometimes, meditators ...


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Breathing is taught to extent in some zen schools though what I've been exposed to is a little different than what you're describing. First off, the technique you've mentioned seems a little forced to me. Belly breathing is more about relaxation than it is about simply forcing out your belly. Instead of trying to force air into your abdomen, instead focus ...


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When one fist starts meditating, one's mind is unused to the activity and may start to panic. When the mind panics, all sorts of weird threats and pains and bodily effects might appear; the mind is too attached to its own activity, and it starts to distort perception in order to give itself something to fuss over. This isn't about your breathing — breathing ...


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Hahaha! Excellent question! What if the body did the breathing for the mind? The biorhythm attached to the breath has its own tempo, as does the heart, the viscera, etc. When you exercise, fatigue accrues when there are disharmonies in those biorhythms - you don't get tired from being at rest. The premise is enveloping one biorhythm in another, centralising ...


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