15

Your confusion is clear as day to me. :) As is the true meaning of "emptiness". The challenge is how to explain it to you in a way you can understand. :) You are stuck on this idea of "object" being something that exists ontologically. Whether it's made of parts, whether it's a transient aggregate that will eventually fall apart, right ...


5

I'll try to explain this from the Theravada perspective, which I think is more or less the same as Madhyamaka emptiness, once you analyze it deeply. In addition to this answer, please also see "Linking Madhyamaka emptiness to Theravada emptiness through papanca". From Sutta Nipata 4.14, we read: "I ask the kinsman of the Sun, the great seer, ...


5

I would recommend Insight into Emptiness by by Khensur Jampa Tegchok and Thubten Chodron. This book discusses the tenets of all four of these schools and compares and contrasts them. Further, the authors are of the same branch of Tibetan Buddhism as His Holiness the Dalai Lama and the latter author also works very closely with the Dalai Lama and is a co-...


4

With many traditions and teachers to choose from, how should one figure out what is the true Dhamma? From AN 8.53 "Gotami, the qualities of which you may know, 'These qualities lead to passion, not to dispassion; to being fettered, not to being unfettered; to accumulating, not to shedding; to self-aggrandizement, not to modesty; to discontent, not to ...


4

The mind of a fully enlightened one is completely empty of discursive thoughts. It does not conceptualize at all. In fact, this has already occurred to an Arya being at the 7th Bhumi let alone a fully enlightened Buddha. So the answer to your question is that an enlightened mind DOES NOT distinguish itself from all other phenomena. For references I draw from ...


3

How do you know that you have arrived at the true Dhamma? From MN 9: Ven. Sariputta said, "When a disciple of the noble ones discerns what is unskillful, discerns the root of what is unskillful, discerns what is skillful, and discerns the root of what is skillful, it is to that extent that he is a person of right view, one whose view is made straight, ...


3

Ghost and horror stories are thrill-seeking venues, not much different from a roller-coaster or bungie-jump. The egoic mind seeks them out because it suffers from an existential fear of extinction. The story creates a fantasy in which the hero confronts a murderous supernatural force and then escapes or overcomes it (for the moment), even while that force ...


3

It means to incline your mind towards dispassion, dispassion towards the sense objects, dispassion towards craving for existence and dispassion towards craving for non-existence. Inclining your mind toward dispassion means to incline your mind towards disenchantment, no longer being enchanted with sense objects, craving for existence and craving for non-...


3

You are beginning to notice the natural behaviors that we all carry out. This is a great thing as most people don't even take a moment to understand their behavior or how/why it functions that way. As you are noticing like this, all kinds of weird side effects may start arising, as you are really shaking the foundation of the way you perceive the world. Fear ...


3

The monastic rules of the Vinaya has rules pertaining to food, lodging, medicine, conduct etc. There are rules pertaining to medical care. The Buddha ate, slept, wore robes, took medicine when he was ill etc. The Middle Way of the Buddha avoids both extreme indulgence and extreme asceticism. It includes moderation in food, healthcare and living. To neglect ...


3

Mahayana Buddhists do NOT believe that the whole world and all objects are literally created by the mind. Yogacara and especially Mahayana is not a form of subjective idealism, that's a popular urban myth/misunderstanding. "the people they see in front of them have consciousness and sensations (individual mindstreams)" - yes of course. "but ...


3

Part of the "philosophy of science" (as it was taught me in Physics class in school) is that there are different ways of looking at things, different levels of details -- e.g. sub-atomic physics, then chemistry, biology, maybe ecology after that, astro-physics -- not to even mention sociology, psychology, maths, and so on. So these are different &...


3

Usually,it goes like this - the flower before you seems real. Now get closer, you no longer see flower, but just leaves, stem. Even closer, you "see" atoms, electrons, etc. See? the flower is "empty" of inherent existence. The same goes for "self". Try search for the "self" in your thoughts, arm, leg, etc. and you ...


3

Let's say there's a person called George, who is a lay single unmarried man, aged 39, and is strongly interested in Buddhism. Now let's take a look at other people around him. Let's say his friend Tom, is of the same age and is happily married with 3 kids. He looks at George and pities him for being single and not having his own family. He thinks about ...


2

Well it is most certainly based on these passages; Take another mendicant who says: ‘I’ve developed the heart’s release by compassion. I’ve cultivated it, made it my vehicle and my basis, kept it up, consolidated it, and properly implemented it. Yet somehow the thought of harming still occupies my mind.’ They should be told, ‘Not so, venerable! … For it is ...


2

Buddhaghosa says in the Visuddhimagga: "When there is suffering in others it causes (karoti) good people's hearts to be moved (kampana), thus it is compassion (karuna). Or alternatively, it combats (kinati) others' suffering, attacks and demolishes it, thus it is compassion. Or alternatively, it is scattered (kiriyati) upon those who suffer, it is ...


2

The Buddha knew everything about what was essential to know. The Pali suttas say: Those who mistake the unessential to be essential and the essential to be unessential, dwelling in wrong thoughts, never arrive at the essential. Those who know the essential to be essential and the unessential to be unessential, dwelling in right thoughts, do arrive at the ...


2

The Heart Sutra is of utmost importance in Mahayana because it declares the key realization that makes Mahayana distinct from a superficial "Sutra-Yana": That in the ultimate sense all concepts are arbitrary, including even the concepts comprising Buddha-Dharma, that ontological reality behind concepts is by itself free from any discriminations, ...


2

"Of course you are uncertain, Kalamas. Of course you are in doubt. When there are reasons for doubt, uncertainty is born. So in this case, Kalamas, don't go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the thought, 'This contemplative ...


2

According to my knowledge, to become a bodhisattvas, the person should obtain due certainty of being a bodhisattvas from a Buddha with the effect of Karma. We could identify this fact by considering the story behind Maithree bodhisattvas.


2

As i understand it they think that those who do a ceremonial ritual of taking the Bodhisatta vows become Bodhisattas. I may be wrong tho.


2

There's a nice paper on the topic, called "Why the Buddha Never Uttered a Word" by Mario D’Amato - you can find it on Academia website. You'd do best to read it all, although you may certainly prefer to skip to a section titled "Mindful Buddha versus Mindless Buddha". There Mario cites some other work that says: ... Dunne goes on to ...


2

Ghost or horror stories/videos are not appropriate during a pandemic. Instead, you should educate yourself about the reality of pandemic, such as at this link. Watching ghost or horror stories/videos is negligence or heedlessness. The Dhammapada says: The foolish and ignorant indulge in heedlessness, but the wise one keeps his heedfulness as his best ...


2

Also why this is not exist in Thervada Buddhism when statue is in Bihar state of India? Probably because there's no concept of a female Buddha according to Early Buddhism (by Early Buddhism, I mean the earliest text strata translated into both the Theravada's Nikayas and Mahayana's Agamas). “He understands: ‘It is impossible, it cannot happen that a woman ...


2

This is pretty normal, I'm guessing most practitioners go through this phase. You have a certain - valid but incomplete - understanding of Dharma, and so you interpret your observations from this perspective, creating subjective reality that looks somewhat negative. What you see is not wrong, these negative observations are not wrong, but they are a small ...


2

The Buddha had a personality, for sure. His personality is who he was, moment to moment, but not the result of him desiring to become that personality. But you are not a Buddha, and much of your life experiences has built upon the habit of creating a self-reinforcing personality. Those habits are part of who you are, moment to moment, the result of deep ...


2

I've read that one shouldn't sacrifice one's own welfare for the welfare of others, no matter how great. Clearly know your own welfare and be intent on the highest good. It's from Dhammapada verse 166. This aside, consider the legal argument of forced vaccination precedent as it was argued in "Jacobson vs Massachusetts, 197 U.S. 11 (1905), wherein ...


2

Let's think for a moment about the choice this question (apparently) leaves us with. Do we: align ourselves with the set of anxieties and angers that coalesce around conceptions of highly transmissible and overtly deadly diseases, or... align ourselves with the set of anxieties and angers that coalesce around conceptions of overbearing sociopolitical actors ...


2

so•lip•sism sŏl′ĭp-sĭz″əm, sō′lĭp-► n. The theory that the self is the only thing that can be known and verified. n. The view that the self is the only reality. n. The belief or proposition that the person entertaining it alone exists and that other people exist only as ideas in his mind That being the definition of Solipsism non of the schools of ...


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