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Just like with any other religion, when the author of the teachings is no longer alive to clarify what is authentic and what is not, the followers of the teachings will naturally come up with different interpretation and also mix things up with teachings of other religions or belief systems. Even in the time of the Buddha, Devadatta was able to have his own ...


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In Mahayana these kinds of things are learned from the encyclopedic compendiums summarizing the basic concepts by categories, known as "Mahayana Abhidharma" and its predecessor "Sarvastivada Abhidharma". The main idea to understand here is how Mahayana emphasizes passing-on the intended meaning behind the scripture. So even though the original sutras were ...


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From my experience, the biggest diff is in the amount of rational explanation. Tibetan teachers and texts are much more inclined to giving a step by step logical rational reasonable conceptual framework. Zen teachers and texts speak to direct experience, using spur of the moment analogies and play on words. Judging by the very fact that you asked this ...


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From Vimalakirti Sutra: At that time, there lived in the great city of Vaisali a certain Licchavi, Vimalakirti by name. Having served the ancient Buddhas, he had generated the roots of virtue by honoring them and making offerings to them. He had attained tolerance as well as eloquence. He played with the great superknowledges. He had attained the power ...


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Questions about omniscience often arise, but the answers point us to a different knowledge: MN90:17.4: “Sir, I asked you about omniscience, and you answered. The Buddha taught us to not get trapped in the net of views worrying about omniscience. The Buddha taught the Four Noble Truths, which apply to the past, present and future for all sentient beings. ...


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To paraphrase an answer I once heard from the POV of a Gelugpa Lama: In Tibetan Buddhism, we guide the student to the top of the mountain using well-trodden and safe paths, around and up to the top. Zen goes right up the north flank. Generally speaking, both are categorized as Mahayana, but there is much more ritual and esoterism in Tibetan Buddhism, it ...


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It's a Mahayana sutra. Info. about the Samadhiraja sutra from the wiki page here. Full infos. and whole sutra is available here.


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These are covered in the: 15 Wrong / Right Views 16 Doubts 108 thought-courses motivated by craving mentioned in this answer 15 Wrong / Right Views Let go of the past “How, bhikshus, does one pursue the past? (1) One seeks delight there, thinking: ‘I had such form in the past.’ (2) One seeks delight there, thinking: ‘I had such feeling in ...


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I have read MN, then SN, then AN - so that's another way to sequence it. Then you can read Questions of King Milinda. Then Tattvasiddhi Śāstra by Harivarman also known as Satyasiddhi Śāstra, Then Vasubandhu's Abhidharma-kosa. Then the Rice Seedling sutra. Then try Vimalakirti sutra. Then Diamond sutra. Then Heart sutra. Then Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamikakarika....


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With many traditions and teachers to choose from, how should one figure out what is the true Dhamma? From AN 8.53 "Gotami, the qualities of which you may know, 'These qualities lead to passion, not to dispassion; to being fettered, not to being unfettered; to accumulating, not to shedding; to self-aggrandizement, not to modesty; to discontent, not to ...


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Traditionally from Mahayana perspective, the contrast with non-Mahayana is an important part of the teaching, so the differences is something we study in-depth, in order to understand and avoid non-Mahayana mistakes. For each of the following points, there's a traditional elaboration, explaining in detail how and why each side says what it says. In non-...


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There's only two Ch'an lines active in the West that I know of, the first one founded by Hsuan Hua. Its headquarters are in California. It has branch temples, for the West mainly in the US, listed on this page. The second is the Western Chan Fellowship, who actually list Xuyun in their lineage, and has branches in the US and Europe.


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The Pitāpūtrasamāgama-sūtra is most likely based on some earlier Abhidharmic writings from one or two centuries after the Buddha’s death. Multiple versions of this sutra have been recovered, perhaps the most famous one from the Ratnakuta collection. The dating of this collection is uncertain, but the collection is mentioned in the Nikāyasaṅgraha, a ...


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Mahayana vs Theravada, crucial differences Declare-- My position is of Mahayana the Chinese lineage, selected Sutras I studied, all or parts: Agamas (& some Pali Nikayas), Perfect Enlightenment, Avatamsaka, Surangama, Lotus Sutra, Lankavatara, Saṃdhi-nirmocana-sūtra, Mahayana Parinirvana, Amitāyurdhyāna-sūtra, Diamond Sutra, Platform Sutra, Prajna ...


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How to understand the lankavatara sutra and 'mind only' will depend on what practice or practices you are engaged with. At least some Buddhists thought that the "one mind" - Buddhahood -- includes all other minds. From scholarship by Charles Jones, p113 of Chinese Pure Land Buddhism: Incidentally, people complain about academic analysis, but I think that'...


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Thrangu Rinpoche once said that everything we see (all phenomena we experience) is our own projection - except other people's minds. Only other people's subjective experience is not our projection and therefore exists independently of us.


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An ethical decision making framework leads upward: AN8.35:1.12: The heart’s wish of an ethical person succeeds because of their purity. Yet, driven by intention and wishes, it also leads to rebirth, which is not the goal of the Noble Eightfold Path. AN8.35:4.8: As they’ve settled for less and not developed further, their idea leads to rebirth there. ...


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It's described in a couple of pages of The Complete Foundation: The Systematic Approach to Training the Mind by HH the Dalai Lama. I paraphrase: It is the one object of all blame -- the source of all miseries therefore the only object to be blamed for all misfortune. Normally we blame others because we are self-righteous Problems come from the ...


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If you want to know all about realized Bodhisattvas, their way of life and what their minds are like, you can do no better than Shantideva's Guide to the Bodhisattva's Way of Life. Picture the most sublimely altruistic mind(s) imaginable without one bit of self-cherishing and devoted only to that which is beneficial for other sentient beings in a completely ...


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The book "In the Buddha's Words" by Bhikkhu Bodhi is an excellent anthology of the suttas. The PDF version can be found here. I strongly recommend the sutta order from this anthology, and I quote it below. However, the sutta translations below may not all be from Bhikkhu Bodhi. They all come from SuttaCentral, instead of the book. Also, some of the sutta ...


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Buddhism teaches Anatta (not self) and the Nibbana is the final goal. You can't find them in Advaita Vedanta. Buddism also has Noble Eightfold Path with a clear set of instructions as to how to attain Nibbana. In my opinion, it is just more than semantics. The only way to be sure is to study and practice both.


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In the video, the speaker said: Vedanta is about Atma (the Self). ... the next word is Sakshi (Witness) ... What is the Self? Is it this bundle of flesh and blood? Is this person in the body? The mind, the intellect, the memory, the likes and dislikes, the knowledge, the person I think I am - is that the Self? Or is it something beyond that? ...


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You've asked for a Mahayana text, which may or may not include MN121, in which the Buddha says: MN121 Whatever ascetics and brahmins enter and remain in the pure, ultimate, supreme emptiness—whether in the past, future, or present—all of them enter and remain in this same pure, ultimate, supreme emptiness. Although "emptiness" is probably what ...


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"Of course you are uncertain, Kalamas. Of course you are in doubt. When there are reasons for doubt, uncertainty is born. So in this case, Kalamas, don't go by reports, by legends, by traditions, by scripture, by logical conjecture, by inference, by analogies, by agreement through pondering views, by probability, or by the thought, 'This contemplative ...


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How do you know that you have arrived at the true Dhamma? From MN 9: Ven. Sariputta said, "When a disciple of the noble ones discerns what is unskillful, discerns the root of what is unskillful, discerns what is skillful, and discerns the root of what is skillful, it is to that extent that he is a person of right view, one whose view is made straight, ...


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I don't think recorded miracles will help you much for even if there're detailed records, there'll always be 2 camps: the skeptics will always have their own explanation/interpretation while the believers will always believe it their way. So the best way is to practice and see it in your own experience. Check out Ven. Hsuan Hua's great commentary on the ...


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Don't quite agree with the other answers so I'll try and flesh out the differences. First, it is important to understand that the cittamatra view is not the pinnacle of prajnaparamita. It is one stop that some beings need to arrive at before reaching the pinnacle of the perfection of wisdom. Second, it is important to know that although the Laṅkāvatāra ...


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They're all omniscient. However, there's a "scope" to their omniscience, which was discussed in MN 71. And Ven. Bodhi's note citing the Commentary's explanation: MA explains that part of the statement is valid is the assertion that the Buddha is omniscient and all-seeing; the part that is excessive is the assertion that knowledge and vision are ...


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