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7

I believe this is the story you are referring to. It's a great story explaining the origin of the monks' rule to avoid alcohol. It also shows a bit of the Buddha's sense of humor. This is from "The Bhikkhus' Rules: A Guide for Laypeople" http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/authors/ariyesako/layguide.html "The drinking of alcohol or fermented liquors is [...


5

It's Jataka #388 (Tuṇḍila Jātaka): "Something strange to-day," etc. The Master told this tale while dwelling in Jetavana, concerning a brother who feared death. He was born in Sāvatthi of good family and was ordained in the Faith: but he feared death and when he heard even a little moving of a bough, or falling of a stick or voice of bird or beast or ...


4

The precepts were not created all at one time but instead they were created every time a problem arose like "monks drinking" for example. The precepts aren't commandments but instead they are simply statements that say: "If one behaves like X then Y will happen". In other words, drinking alcohol will lead to one's suffering. If one doesn't want to suffer ...


3

Concerning the study of religion, an approach for historical accuracy is irrelevant. Most creation myths/stories contain their own disclaimers. . . its a myth/story. However in context of the religion the story may be evaluated. It does not need to hold to outside standards, but rather internally to the context of the religion. One example would be that ...


3

Buddhism has been taught throughout centuries to people of different cultural backgrounds and intellectual capabilities. Western people with critical minds who spent years at school read some legends with a pinch of salt. But they should accept it that for other people such stories make perfect sense, inspire them and bring them closer to enlightenment. ...


3

There are a lot of different stories regarding the Buddha, some of them became popular, but we know are not true, for example: He escaped in the middle of the night while no one was watching. We know he didn't scape like a prisoner, instead he cut his hair in front of his father, his father knew Siddharta was leaving to a homelessness life. The birth and ...


3

It depends what you mean by truth. If you mean did this actually occur then I would agree it does seem far fetched. However if you understand it as a myth then it will have truth. I think sometimes we understand myths as been basically being synonymous with fiction. However myths have a deeper truth that is relevant to the culture or society that it comes ...


3

You should not believe all the stories to become a Buddhist dear friend. Instead you should believe Noble Eightfold Path and taking refuge in the triple Gems (Load Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha). Taking refuge doesn't mean that the person has to pray for them or looking forward until they do something for you. We have to believe Lord Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha ...


3

This belief comes from a popular Chinese Buddhist tale in Mulian saves his mother from Hell. Mulian Saves His Mother From Hell is a popular Chinese Buddhist tale originating in the 3rd century CE, inspired by tales from India of Maudgalyayana, who becomes Mulian in the Chinese stories. Mulian, a virtuous monk, seeks the help of the Buddha to rescue his ...


3

[This is not a direct answer, but comment space is too limited] This kind of belief in short cuts to salvation appear to be a later cultural addition to Buddhism, though sending metta to ancestors is a well recognized aspect of Buddhism. Texts like the Surangama Sutra, itself a later addition, says the Buddha participated in some such practices of saving ...


2

For reference, according to this account1, it was Mara's choice to assail the Buddha -- Mara is presented as another/separate being, an agent, a divinity (and not as a metaphor for unenlightened aspects of the future Buddha's mind)2: At this point the god Mâra, exclaiming, "Prince Siddhattha is desirous of passing beyond my control, but I will never allow ...


2

In my understanding, Buddha did not progress through the four stages of enlightenment he later prescribed for his students. This is because, for Buddha students - you start with theoretical understanding (stream entry), and then you practice according to instructions until you achieve it (arahant-hood). In Buddha's case, because he is Self-Awakened, he ...


2

This doesn't answer your question directly, but it's good contextual information I think. From the book "Women in Buddhism - Questions and Answers" by Chatsumarn Kabilsingh Ph.D. An important point that Thai women put much emphasis on ordination of their sons is because they themselves have no opportunity to be ordained, so they depend totally on ...


2

If a question is being asked about the precise details of a purported factual event in historical time 2500 years ago, then there is no possible answer other than to say that there is no hope of ever confirming or denying any such thing on that level. There are no video recordings left over from 2500 years ago, and so on. The kinds of evidence that one might ...


1

That story might be from a Jataka tale, or (I'm not sure which) from the introduction to the Jatakas. This ... BUDDHIST BIRTH-STORIES (JATAKA TALES) The Commentarial Introduction Entitled NIDANA-KATHA THE STORY OF THE LINEAGE ... says (on pages 154-155), Thousands of world- systems became visible to him like a single open space. Men and devas ...


1

A real Buddhist is a person who takes refuge in the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha. Dhammapada, along with it's stories are a part of the Dhamma. So if you reject the stories and still claim to be a Buddhist, you are essentially saying that you don't accept those stories as a part of the Dhamma. But it's a bad practice for a person to start deciding what parts of ...


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