27

First off, I wouldn't recommend Tibetan Book of the Dead, since it's not exactly a primer in Buddhism, I don't think. There are lots of introductions from various traditions; the perennial favourite is What the Buddha Taught by Walpola Rahula. He's also written pieces on the difference (or lack thereof) between the various schools, so he's pretty unbiased ...


18

Quick First Read What the Buddha Taught by Walpola Rahula (Recommended) Good Question, Good Answer by S. Dhammika Introductions to the Early Texts In the Buddha's Words by Bhikkhu Bodhi The Life of the Buddha by Ñāṇamoli Bhikkhu (Recommended) Buddha-Dhamma for University Students by Buddhadasa Bhikkhu Comprehensive Introductions to All Traditions The ...


11

I personally use the following translations: Paper copies of Bhikkhu Bodhi's translations of Nikayas (for example Majjhima) for nice smooth English rendition. Access To Insight for quick and convenient search. Dharmafarer for in-depth analysis. When in doubt, I do my own translation with a dictionary (Sanskrit, Pali, I also use a number of Pali-Russian ...


9

i recommend "The Heart of the Buddha's Teachings" by Thich Nhat Hanh Good luck on your journey, Tord


8

I'll offer a controversial option, simply because it's the one that got me started (and in fact after reading it I don't believe the controversy is deserved). It's "Mastering The Core Teachings of the Buddha" (or "MCTB" by its fans) by Daniel Ingram . Perhaps the main reason it is controversial is because Ingram gives himself the title "Arahat" on the cover ...


8

According to Buddhist dependent origination, depending on contact feeling arise, depending on feeling craving arise, depending on craving clinging arise, etc... The feelings that arise is a result of past conditioning and when there is contact the past feeling that was conditioned arise, be that attachment, revulsion or neutral feeling. The practice to ...


7

A Handful of Leaves has books and papers. Also http://www.dhammatalks.net/, http://www.wisdomlib.org/, http://www.buddhanet.net/ (multiple authors) and http://www.dhammatalks.org/ (by Thanissaro Bhikkhu), http://www.aimwell.org/. In addition https://archive.org/ does have many old Buddhist books. http://static.sirimangalo.org/pdf/ has also got scans of some ...


6

Here's a few of resources from our tradition: http://www.aimwell.org/dependentorigination.html - a book by the Mahasi Sayadaw, one of Burma's greatest meditation teachers https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n_llBSCXt6c - a video by me, some monk from the Internet http://www.sirimangalo.org/teachings/lessons-in-practical-buddhism/practical-dependent-...


6

(Bear in mind, I don't have mastery over the language but I've been swimming in it continuously for the last two years. The following advice is based on this experience.) There is a whole list of books about learning Pāḷi. Some of them you can find here. I suggest applying the grammar that you learn from them, in Yuttadhammo's Digital Pali Reader (DPR) ...


6

As you know this is a controversial topic which has been discussed before, e.g. here: Does illegal downloading or viewing of copyright material violate the second precept? One answer (the accepted answer) to that topic says that "copyright is an artificial right" and isn't theft. I think a safe or safer answer would be that if you keep to the terms (...


5

One of the classic introductions to Zen is Zen Mind, Beginners Mind by Shunryu Suzuki. Bhante Gunaratans's Mindfulness in Plain English is widely cited as an excellent introduction to Vipassana meditation.


5

If you are interested in Vajrayana or Tantric Buddhism, I highly recommend the book by Reginald Ray titled, Secret of the Vajra World. He even covers a brief overview of other forms of Buddhism at the beginning, then dives into the Vajrayana. It's very clearly written and covers a wide variety of the aspects of Tibetan Buddhist (Vajrayana Buddhist) practice ...


5

Courses Partiyatti Learning Center offers two free online Pāli courses. Pali Online School at the Oxford Centre for Buddhist Studies is a very intensive 3-week online Pāli course, that involves live instruction by prof. Richard Gombrich, a well-known scholar of Theravāda. The aim is to enable students to read original canonical texts in Pāli, with the aid ...


4

Can I give a shout out for Jack Kornfield's excellent A Path with a Heart. I think it can be profitably read by a beginner or someone who has been practicing for many years. I've read it a couple of time I have every intention of reading it again. I think it's also good to get into the actual original texts. Bhikkhu Bodhi is very good as said by yuttadhammo ...


4

Two most interesting pieces of analysis I found are Nanavira Thera's Notes on Dhamma (http://www.nanavira.org/notes-on-dhamma/paticcasamuppada) and Buddhadasa's "Practical Dependent Origination" (http://buddhasociety.com/online-books/buddhadasa-bhikkhu-paticcasamuppada-21-2#TOC and http://www.dhammatalks.net/Books6/Bhikkhu_Buddhadasa_Paticcasamuppada....


4

Here are some URLs for some good info on Nagarjuna and his teachings. Some great sites below, too. Dr. Berzin (Fulbright Scholar, etc.) was a translator for HH the Dalai Lama for a while and the late Ven. Tsenshab Serkong Rinpoche, a teacher of HH the Dalai Lama. I. "Biography of Nagarjuna", [http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/en/archives/...


4

As mentioned in a some comments I would highly recommend In the Buddha's Words - An Anthology of Discourses from the Pali Canon (The Teachings of the Buddha) by Buddha Shakyamuni as compiled by Bikkhu Bodhi: What better teacher can you find for an introduction to Buddhism than the Buddha himself? This is where I began and to my knowledge every extent ...


4

Meditation for children is a good video series for kids. It's also available in DVD format. There are some cartoons of the Jataka stories in youtube There are about 550 Jataka stories available which you can read to kids. Here are some simple English translations.


4

I have done the same thing for slower speakers. In my opinion, it's just fine to speed up your listening as long as you grasp the content.


4

"In the Buddha's Words" by Bhikkhu Bodhi. The PDF version of it can be downloaded here. It is an anthology or selection of translated suttas from the Pali Canon. It is also thematically and systematically arranged. I highly recommend this book to anyone who finds the Sutta Pitaka too huge and difficult to traverse. Bhikkhu Bodhi is one of the foremost ...


3

Bodhicitta Vivarana "A Commentary on the Awakening Mind" is both complete and accessible. Sanskrit title: Bodhicittavivarana Tibetan title: byang chub sems kyi 'grel pa Homage to glorious Vajrasattva! It has been stated: Devoid of all real entities; Utterly discarding all objects and subjects, Such as aggregates, elements and sense-fields; Due to sameness ...


3

The best and most detailed explanation of paticcasamuppada I know of is in Buddhagosa's Visuddhimagga. There is an English translation by Bh. Nanamoli in the book The Path of Purification (free pdf, look at chapter XVII: Dependent Origination).


3

Lots of great suggestions above, but it looks to me like there's plenty of room to add a foundational Mahayana text to the mix. I suggest a complete presentation of the path in the form of a poem: Shantideva's "Way of the Bodhisattva" (Bodhicaryāvatāra). An especially poetic translation with commentary that helps make the immediate practical value of this ...


3

Despite the name (which I dislike), The Monk and the Philosopher is a great introduction to Buddhism from a Western point of view. It's a series of conversations between a French-Buddhist monk, Matthieu Ricard, and his father, Jean-François Revel, a philosopher. I found it more compelling than classical Buddhist texts, including some of the ones suggested ...


3

I would like to recommend as introductory books "Richard Gombrich: What the Buddha Thought" The book is written by an English scholar. Gombrich does not consider himself a Buddhist but he expresses a high estimation for the Buddha's teaching. The title of the book alludes to the title of the book by Rahula mentioned above. Rahula was one of Gombrich's ...


3

I just read this, and it is pretty solid. It's from the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, so it should meet the requirement that it be an academic text. I recommend also reading the suttas (source texts), many of which are available here and simply reading them critically. A third option is to buy a text such as this which has suttas as well as ...


3

*You may be able to build an ongoing lesson about the key Buddhist concept of impermanence and ongoing change using various aspects of growing things. From planting seeds indoors in the winter, (or bulbs outdoors in the fall), to caring for the plants, replanting them outdoors once it's warm, watching them grow, seeing them die, knowing they'll grow back ...


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