New answers tagged

-3

Yes, of course. Okay, let's try once again: what is Nirvana? It's a pleasure. Does it differs from some desires (please notice that Buddha's key teaching was about freeding from desire, but you need a desire to freed from desire) like alcohol, cigarettes or sex for people who have had desires? Not really, moreover Buddhist Monks won't have children because ...


1

Ven. S. Dhammika's book "Broken Buddha" is often quoted, but some people think that he is anti-establishmentarian. Personally, I think it's a great book to help you get rid of overly romanticized views of the monastic order in modern day settings. To support this, I will quote other popular monks. For the question of politics within the monastic ...


1

Traditionally the two states are compared to a person's digestion, the lay state is likened to a weak digestion and being a member of the order is likened to a robust digestive system. As a weak digestive system can not digest food dense in nutriment, so the lay state can not support Arahantship for long. In practice, as i see it, there can now be numerous ...


3

I think there are some modern schools of "lay Buddhism" i.e. in which have no ordained monks -- including Triratna, and Soka Gakkai (and Navayana in India). Ironically, Buddhist modernism suggests that schools which don't have ordained monks also do away with doctrines about nirvana. The idea that becoming a monk might not be the best way, is I ...


3

It is truly difficult to follow the path when being a lay person, just see how difficult it is to observe the 5 precepts as a lay person. You will find it much easier to follow the path with people who have a similar goal like you, i.e the Sangha. That being said unless you can really live the minimalistic life of a contemporary monk (not the newer monk ...


3

To answer simply the question: No, being (doing) a lay Buddhist has NOT any advantage over a (doing) Monk who is gone forth, as far as following the Dhamma path to Nirvana is concerned.


3

That's the question. Is being a lay Buddhist has any advantage over a Monk who is gone forth, as far as following the Dhamma path to Nirvana is concerned? A common stock phrase being used in many suttas: Household life is confining, a dusty path. The life gone forth is like the open air. It is not easy living at home to practice the holy life totally ...


5

There is the case of Ghaṭīkāra, who was asked: MN81:11.2: ‘Dear Ghaṭīkāra, you have heard this teaching, so why don’t you go forth from the lay life to homelessness?’ Ghaṭīkāra responded: MN81:11.3: ‘Don’t you know, dear Jotipāla, that I look after my blind old parents?’ And Ghaṭīkāra was a non-returner: MN81:18.16: And since he has ended the five lower ...


Top 50 recent answers are included