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8

Even in a world where the law of karma is real and in effect, one needs laws and punishment for a few reasons. Karma doesn't "issue", and its effects are not "punishment"; in Buddhist view it's a blind process of cause and effect and the effects of karma are not to be known or speculated about. This is one of the four imponderables: § 22. "These four ...


6

The clearest example of this that I can think of is in the Mahaparinibbana Sutta (DN 16) where the Buddha was asked (obliquely) by the brahman Vassakara on behalf of King Ajatasattu whether he had a chance at killing off an enemy nation. The Buddha replied with the seven "Conditions of a Nation's Welfare": At that time the Venerable Ananda was standing ...


5

The guiding principles of an ideal king it to follow is the Dasavidha-rājadhamma Dāna (charity) — being prepared to sacrifice one's own pleasure for the well-being of the public, such as giving away one's belongings or other things to support or assist others, including giving knowledge and serving public interests. Sīla (morality) — practicing ...


3

Masturbation is not a Dharma practice, even in Secret Mantra.


2

Following is a link to the Niyama Dhammas in Wikipedia. Following is a translation from Pali Sources. Also this is a text by Ledi Sayadaw called "THE NIYAMA-DIPANI: The Manual of Cosmic Order". If you have the power of deep Jhana and make a strong determination (which is part of the perfections) then there is a possibility that the something similar desired ...


2

Prisons (and the laws that put people in them) serve two purposes: As a punishment for criminals (with the goal of rehabilitation) and a deterrent would-be criminals. To protect the public from people who are likely to re-offend and cause harm to others. Especially in the second case, we can see incarceration of dangerous people as an act of compassion ...


2

First of all we have to keep in mind that the karma is a activity which is based on reason and result theory (Pratītyasamutpāda). in karma reason is the cetanā( intention of the doing). Result of the doing which has done with cetanā(intention) depends on the nature of cetanā. if someone did something with good intention he will have good results and if ...


2

It is not a sin for laymen. Even for monks, it will become a "sin", if it's goal or end result is ejaculation, but not otherwise.


2

You can read some advice given by the Buddha in DN16 in the section entitled "Conditions of a Nation's Welfare". There are many items listed like organizing and dispersing assemblies peacefully, living according to established rules, honoring the elders, protecting women, protecting Arahats etc. You can also read "The Edicts of King Asoka" translated by Ven....


1

Content with that ...(see sutta)..., he does not exert himself further in solitude by day or seclusion by night. For him, living thus heedlessly, there is no joy. There being no joy, there is no rapture. There being no rapture, there is no serenity. There being no serenity, he dwells in pain. When pained, the mind does not become centered. When the mind is ...


1

Wisdom over Justice or Justice vs. Skillfulness gives answers to possible understand.


1

Upasaka Swapnil, Upasaka asked 'Does Asian countries has Buddhist law in their parliament/government?' Not sure (possible worthy a question and research) but as far as my person perceives it seems to be that the Kingdom of Cambodia, the land of the Khmer (khema, meaning land, person at peace, refuge) is actually the last/only country left which tries to ...


1

There is an example or a restatement (or an original statement) of that here, in the Uposatha Sutta, [6] And furthermore, just as the ocean has a single taste — that of salt — in the same way, this Dhamma & Vinaya has a single taste: that of release... Bikkhu Bodhi quotes that passage in a couple of his essays, e.g. The Taste of Freedom and The ...


1

A king who follows the ways of Buddhism, by role, perfectly, is called a Sakvithi King. He generally rules by consulting wise men on all of his decisions. Such a king, himself, is a very righteous person in a Buddhist context. Such a king, is known to come to automatically possess a Sakvithi Gem which appears at his possession due to his worthiness (by ...


1

Nation building is achieve through giving capital, supporting agriculture, protecting the business and farming community, increasing and strengthening the military, being a virtuous and exemplary government and a leader, etc. This is mainly covered in the Cakkavattisihanada Sutta as well as Mahaparinibbana Sutta (as in the above answer).


1

Because other laws serve their purpose and karma law is law of nature. So, to acquire our goals we establish our laws. With established laws we don't try to replace law of karma. So if you murder someone there will be equal consequences regardless. Degree of consequences is not established by the law of karma, only wholesomeness of them. Check this fine ...


1

"Since we have the law of karma then there should be no need for laws or prisons? The law of karma will issue out punishment automatically. So if you murder someone there will be equal consequences regardless. Is this correct?" I essentially agree with your conclusion. The ones inflicting any sort of suffering will be "punished" by karma. This includes all ...


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