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"Jivaka, I say that there are three instances in which meat should not be eaten: when it is seen, heard, or suspected (that the living being has been specifically slaughtered for oneself)... I say that there are three instances in which meat may be eaten: when it is not heard, or suspected (that living beng has been specifically slaughtered for oneself)....


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First Theravada monk do not cook, they alms round, hence they do not purchase meat. They eat meat that was given and must qualified by not seeing killing, not hearing killing, not suspect killing is for him. So, your question is towards Buddhist layperson I think. As Buddhist follower, a layperson practices minimum 5 precepts, for us to avoid bad kamma. ...


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Please read "Why is contributing to the market demand for meat not wrong?". According to the Theravada school of Buddhism (and possibly also other schools), it is against the first precept to kill an animal yourself, but it is ok to buy frozen meat from the supermarket for consumption. Let's say you go to a restaurant as a customer. If the ...


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though they also feed them worms that are alive. Is it breaking the first precept since they don't kill them ? Sure. While you do not actively terminate life by your own hand, handing it over to others to take care of the bussiness requires the volition to end life. And since volition is kamma, you'd incur the appropriate kammic consequences. You wouldn't ...


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It just means that he is done with desire. All views are born from desire: 1) "There is a self", 2)"There is no self", 3)"There is a self and there is no self at the same time" and so on. He is released from craving, therefore he is released from views as well. That's all.


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