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12

Art can be a continuation of samsaric inertia, or it can be an expression of the enlightened mind. What message are you sending with your art? What impulse does it carry forward into the future?


6

I think of karma, seeds of karma, and fruits of karma as individual's action, latent effects of such action, and individual experience resulting from past action, correspondingly. Nothing more, nothing less. I don't read any unscientific mumbo-jumbo into these concepts, purely cause-and-effect. I think of rebirth as a type of karmic process that spans ...


6

Observing the five precepts, Right Action, Right Speech and Right Livelihood, i.e. virtues (sila), with heedfulness (appamāda), with the right intentions, certainly generates good karma. In addition, accumulation of wealth as a layperson and use of this wealth in a generous, charitable way, is also good karma, generating merit. Observance of the five ...


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Pandemics are enabled by random genetic mutation and opportunities for infection. People like to be close and travel. Viruses like new hosts nearby. People are yummy. COVID is hungry. Punishment implies "suffering from past deeds". There really isn't a "Punisher" passing judgement over us in Buddhism. In Buddhism the consequences of a ...


4

In DN1, the Buddha explains in detail what he refrains from. Since you're an artist, you'll understand that art can be used to highlight beauty. Such art would foster clinging and prolong suffering by that attachment: DN1:1.16.1: ‘There are some ascetics and brahmins who, while enjoying food given in faith, still engage in beautifying and adorning ...


4

In the tradition of Thailand, every Buddhist man ordain as monk for a rainy season before get married. Therefore, in Thailand, many monks are not encouraging many more men to remain in the Holy Life. The Holy Life is bitter for a man without virtue that has strong survival instinct of "self". When I live in the monastery, for many years, I see many ...


4

"Jivaka, I say that there are three instances in which meat should not be eaten: when it is seen, heard, or suspected (that the living being has been specifically slaughtered for oneself)... I say that there are three instances in which meat may be eaten: when it is not heard, or suspected (that living beng has been specifically slaughtered for oneself)....


3

What is the source of the cycle of life/death in the scripture , Does it have references in the Pali canon? From SN 15.2: At Savatthı. “Bhikkhus, this samsara is without discoverable beginning. A first point is not discerned of beings roaming and wandering on hindered by ignorance and fettered by craving. Suppose, bhikkhus, a man would reduce this great ...


3

“If you want to understand the causes that existed in the past, look at the results as they are manifested in the present. And if you want to understand what results will be manifested in the future, look at the causes that exist in the present” (“The Opening of the Eyes,” The Writings of Nichiren Daishonin, vol. 1, p. 279).


3

Surrounded by deceit and scams, probably the most important thing to consider first is our own conduct: MN8:12.32: ‘Others will be deceitful, but here we will not be deceitful.’ With right view about our conduct we can then seek out others with equal views about conduct. In this way our choices lead us upwards, away from deceit, away from scams, away ...


3

'Kamma' means 'intentional action' therefore is never 'figurative'. As for the word 'rebirth' meaning 'reincarnation', there appears no equivalent Pali word in the original scriptures. Therefore what is actually 'figurative' is the idea of a 'rebirth after the ending of life'. In original Buddhism, the literal meaning of 'death' ('marana') & 'following ...


3

Nobody is going to punish you for your art. Art is not a crime. But in Buddha’s world the priorities are different. The number one priority is to end suffering. And for that purpose art is a distraction for those follow the Noble Eightfold Path. Most people do not understand the urgency of the matter. If you follow Buddha’s Dhamma then avoid painting and ...


3

On the contrary, the fact that you came to this site, or even thought about Buddhism and karma means you actually inherited some very good karma from the past lives. Having dreams about being chased by police means you have some guilt on your mind. Only you can tell what it is, but you must know - and it must be something obvious to you, it always works that ...


3

Yes, from multiple suttas we see that karma can be done by way of the mind and intentional thoughts only. In fact, according to the first verses of the Dhammapada, the mind precedes all mental states. It's more important than words and actions. From Nibbedhika Sutta: "Intention, I tell you, is kamma. Intending, one does kamma by way of body, speech, &...


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Random thoughts don't collect much bad karma. Intentional and deliberate thoughts generate karma. Habitual intentional thoughts accumulate karma. Now, you are feeling remorse because you had those thoughts. What you should do is acknowledge that those are random thoughts. Acknowledge that you don't have the intention to harm her. And now you should ...


3

First Theravada monk do not cook, they alms round, hence they do not purchase meat. They eat meat that was given and must qualified by not seeing killing, not hearing killing, not suspect killing is for him. So, your question is towards Buddhist layperson I think. As Buddhist follower, a layperson practices minimum 5 precepts, for us to avoid bad kamma. ...


3

Alas, the maze you spoke of is large and different people are stuck in different parts. That's why I asked, "Forget for a moment the idea of reincarnation (or rebirth) from life-to-life and instead concentrate on the situation in this very life and apply the following three concepts: anatta, rebirth (from moment-to-moment), and karma. In your mind, can ...


3

What exactly is rebirth? And what exactly is death? Most people take rebirth to be the rebirth of oneself into a new life. If we zoom further into what this means, this is the continuation of the same consciousness that is aware of its surroundings and its thoughts into a new body with a new identity and new life. The same consciousness from birth wandered ...


3

Random thoughts (like random sexual thoughts) don't collect much bad karma. Intentional and deliberate thoughts generate karma. Habitual intentional thoughts accumulate karma. Now, you are feeling remorse because you had those thoughts. What you should do is acknowledge that those are random thoughts. Acknowledge that you don't have evil intentions. And now ...


3

"the monk, when not loaded down, does not load himself down with pain, nor does he reject pleasure that accords with the Dhamma, although he is not infatuated with that pleasure. He discerns that 'When I exert a fabrication against this cause of dukkha, then from the fabrication of exertion there is dispassion. When I look on with equanimity at that ...


2

Formally the Vinaya, or Buddhist monastic law, states this about killing: pli-tv-bu-vb-pc61There is no offence if it is unintentional; if (he is) not thinking; if he does not know; if he is not meaning death; if he is mad, if he is the first wrong-doer. In particular, notice that ignoring the knowledge that there are living creatures on sports grounds is ...


2

Yes the people involved in the donation matters. The only thing which does not matter for karma is the thing given, but the receiver may not use the gift if it is useless. This is because matter, physical objects are meaningless in buddhism. This has far reaching consequences, such as why you cannot get into rigth samadhi by focusing on objects, contrary to ...


2

Wrong second time. First time there is no factor of intention, second time you wanted him to die for whatever reason. Take a hypothetical example of a person who is unable to kill another intentionally, it being not in his range he couldn't have done it. If not killing is classed categorically as good then the person who doesn't kill can not be blamed for ...


2

The second? I met a pigeon this year which was crippled with an illness. I gave it shelter, food, and water, for about 10 days until it died. I figure that was maybe kinder than trying to kill it when it was helpless. If so, how can I mitigate this bad kamma? "Stop doing it" -- see this answer which quotes SN 42.8. And finally, how can we help him ...


2

Where did Buddhism get this from? Why, it got from the Buddha's direct experience, of course. The Buddha spoke in MN 4: "When the mind was thus concentrated, purified, bright, unblemished, rid of defilement, pliant, malleable, steady, & attained to imperturbability, I directed it to the knowledge of recollecting my past lives. I recollected my ...


2

Dependent origination includes death and rebirth: DN15:2.1: When asked, ‘Is there a specific condition for old age and death?’ you should answer, ‘There is.’ If they say, ‘What is a condition for old age and death?’ you should answer, ‘Rebirth is a condition for old age and death.’ The sutta continues: DN15:3.1: So: name and form are conditions for ...


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Not everything is caused by karma. Some things are caused by other reasons, like the weather. The Sivaka Sutta talks about this. There's a summary at the bottom: Bile, phlegm, and also wind, Imbalance and climate too, Carelessness and assault, With kamma result as the eighth. To quote the sutta in detail: “Some feelings, Sīvaka, arise here originating ...


2

If you throw a rock at a window, there is the expectation of it hitting the window. Where is this expectation stored? Likewise with all intention, intending one acts, throwing a rock is an action which begets results. Where are the expected results stored? If you analyzed the properties of the rock mid flight along with all of the relevant circumstances in ...


2

Khanti/patience is indeed a very important virtue to cultivate. It's listed in Sn 2.4 as among one of the greatest protection for a practitioner. Also refer to many other related suttas. Patience, compliance, seeing contemplatives, discussing the Dhamma on timely occasions: This is the highest protection. ~~ Snp 2.4 ~~


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