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8

I'm glad to see my previous answer proved inspiring / thought-provoking. Following up on that: I'm speaking from the Jewish perspective, specifically the Hasidic perspective. My knowledge of Buddhism is pretty limited, so I will not really be able to give too many points, and I'm sure if you dig into my answers you find specifics that don't line up in the ...


5

I think we can split Buddhism in 3 different levels of commitment: Meditation, Dana (charity) and basic Sila (precepts). In this level, you can easily keep any peaceful religion, you will benefit from meditation and people will feel you are slowly changing, more inclined to a spiritual life, usually your family/friends/priests/bishops etc. will not see it ...


4

From a Buddhist perspective that's fine. The Buddha gave his teachings in order to alleviate the sufferings of living beings, and last time I checked that includes everyone, not just Buddhists. If a non-Buddhist wants to take up certain aspects of Buddhist practices because they feel it will help them, then that is fine. Are you wondering about any ...


3

Well, the "ancient Israelites" lived quite a long time compared with the lifespan of a single individual like Siddharta Gotama, the Buddha. Their own history, taken from the religious tradition, was from Abraham up to 0 BCE (or today, don't know when "ancient" ended...), and this means at least something from 2000 BCE; Moses is estimated to 1200 BCE if I ...


3

Buddhist training is around: Morality Development of a controlled mind Develop true understanding of reality and wisdom There would be no religion which is incompatible with this. Also, Buddhist meditation revolves around how to get out of stress and misery. Any religion will not be opposed to someone seeing a psychologist. Likewise, there is no issue ...


3

Monotheism falls under Sassatha Ditti. It is one of the two false views that prevents one from progressing in the path. Such beliefs are called Maggavarana Ditti. But it does not prevent the path to heavens. Then again, you don't really need Buddhism to reach heavens. But if Nibbana is what you are looking for, you have to give up Monotheism at some point. ...


2

For the sake of discussion, and (by searching Mi Yodeya) to try to answer from the Jewish perspective, This answer warns that certain practices (e.g. bowing) might be seen as "devotional". And this answer, that worshipping the Buddha or seeing him as God-like would be prohibited. This answer says, For a Jew to burn incense in front of a statue is ...


2

The phenomena you mention is so common it has a name. BuJu or JuBu. In fact, there's even a Wikipedia Page on it. Furthermore, the contribution to (Western) Buddhism by Jews is very impressive! Whether this is frowned upon depends on how your Jewish faith and Buddhist practice relate. Whether they contradict, co-exist or complement depends in turn on ...


2

Simple answer is to your Question is NO


2

From my knowledge, it night be quite difficult to practice both, but still might be possible. The Buddha had a few quotes that contradict the teachings of Jesus. The Buddha said: ‘There are some monks and priests who believe that whatever pleasant, painful or neutral experience someone has, all that is due to a supreme god. I approached them and asked ...


2

How different is “joy of ownership” in the Dīgha,jānu Sutta from clinging onto one's wealth? Actually the answer's already provided in the sutta itself. If one clings to one's wealth, s/he won't be able to have a balanced living, the necessary component to the joy of ownership: "And what is balanced living? Here, a clansman knows his income and ...


2

Answering as a practicing Hasidic Jew: I'm not sure if the Buddha himself encountered Jews, but there is an interesting anecdote from Jewish commentary on the Torah, which suggests that Abraham sent his sons -- his children from Hagar, who were not "Jewish" -- "East" bearing "Gifts." Jewish mystical readings of the Torah interpret these gifts as spiritual ...


1

The sutta you chose is quite specific: We are lay people enjoying sensuality; living crowded with spouses & children; using Kasi fabrics & sandalwood; wearing garlands, scents, & creams; handling gold & silver. May the Blessed One teach the Dhamma for those like us, for our happiness & well-being in this life, for our happiness & ...


1

Your basic premise is correct, that giving/receiving, achieving/earning/attaining and any joy that comes from these, are concepts based in duality. In Buddhism, these concepts belong to what's known as "the relative truth". And you are correct that from "the absolute truth"s perspective, these things are empty and contrived. However, you should understand, ...


1

Its likely and its likely India was familiar with contemporary judaism due to Abraham's sons settling in the area and the later dispersion of the lost tribes, they had to go somewhere? Buddha was a truth seeker and a reformer and disturbed by the suffering of people in his kingdom, he forsook all and set out to find answers Israel was well known as news of ...


1

Meditation as a healthy practice of "spiritual hygiene" is not limited to Buddhist practitioners though the language used to teach meditation is easily accessible through Buddhist teachings. Contemplative practice is part of Judaism and other religious traditions. Jewish Buddhist retreats combining practices from both traditions in the setting of competent ...


1

There are a lot of Jewish Buddhists. There is even a slang term for it (Jewbu or Jubu). Wikipedia's Jewish Buddhist article says. A large demographic of Jewish Buddhists, constituting its majority, still maintain religious practices and beliefs in Judaism coupled with Buddhist practices and perhaps beliefs. Since most Buddhists do not consider the Buddha to ...


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