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10

There are very strong similarities between Buddhism and Jainism but there are also a number of major differences as well. It is very true that Buddhism and Jainism use a lot of very similar terminology, but these are mostly terms that were floating around among the Shramanas (ascetics) for some time. Karma, rebirth, the goal as escape from rebirth. etc... ...


6

What you say or justify do not count. What counts is your volition. For volition to give result the volition should have any of the 6 roots (3 wholesome - alob, adosa & amoha + 3 un wholesome - lob, dosa & moha ). When you accidentally step on an insect you do not know of its existance non of these roots arise in your mind, as you do not have any ...


6

In Buddhism the main teachings you have to have faith in is the 8 Fold Path divided into 3 trainings, which is to develop higher virtue, higher mind and higher wisdom. No religion is incompatible with developing higher virtue, higher mind and higher wisdom, therefore you can start practicing considering you self a Hindu. As you find parts of Buddhism ...


5

No. There is no known record of Gautama Buddha meeting Mahavira (also known as Nigantha Nataputta in the Pali Canon). Jains are known as Niganthas in the Pali Canon. It appears however that Mahavira was indeed alive but very old at the time of the Buddha according to DN2: Your majesty, there is Nigantha Nataputta, the leader of a community, the leader ...


5

Here is a version of the story as told by Ajahn Brahmavamso ("a British Theravada Buddhist monk"), in an an essay titled, What the Buddha said about eating meat: Once, a rich and influential general by the name of Siha (meaning 'Lion') went to visit the Buddha. Siha had been a famous lay supporter of the Jain monks but he was so impressed and ...


5

Can one follow Hinduism and Buddhism at the same time? Theravāda branch of Buddhism (in its truest sense) is in stark contrast with Hinduism, but it may not be so for the other branches of Buddhism. It is mainly because the view of sassata is not found in Theravāda. Hinduism teaches that one possesses a soul that lives eternally. This soul is considered to ...


5

Notions of Karma I believe one of the central differences between Jainism and Buddhism is in their respective interpretations of Karma. For Jains Karma is a primarily a matter of external behavior or action. It is physical conduct that leads to Karma and the objective is to free the sould from its karmic accretions. This leads to a practice of inaction ...


5

Are you saying that Buddhism is dependently arisen? The similarities are there. Buddhism shares terminology with both proto-Hinduism and Jainism. I can't remember what the title of the book was. But I read a book about the history of the historical Buddha, from a not-Buddhist perspective, where the reader argued that the time of the Buddha was similar to ...


4

As I understand, one of Buddha's two teachers (Udraka Ramaputta) was a Jain. Evidently Buddha did learn a lot from jains, including the following: the notion of Nibbana meditation on various objects using antidotes to counter pathological mind tendencies the five precepts and the three poisons were inspired by corresponding Jain constructs what later became ...


4

This answer is based on the Theravada tradition. Please read The Bhikkhus' Rules: A Guide for Laypeople by Ven. Ariyesako, Bhikkhu Patimokkha by Ven. Thanissaro and DN 2 for details. A bhikkhu is a fully ordained monk who is required to strictly follow the rules of the Vinaya. All rules come with exceptions. A monk cannot scavenge for his own food or engage ...


3

The Jains were already established and flourishing when the Buddha came on to the scene. There are many places in the suttas where the Buddha debates with Jains and discusses their teachings. There are definite similarities, most likely due to being from the same general area with similar culture, but there are also major differences. In the Suttas they are ...


3

In the Buddhist scriptures there are references to the Buddha or one of his disciples meeting and debating with Jains. In virtually every instance the Buddha or one of his disciples wins the debate and the Jain converts to Buddhism. A less than favorable light is also portrayed to the founder of Jainism, Mahavira. When we compare the vast amount of ...


2

I cannot provide my own answer to your question. However, since most answers here are in the No camp, I thought I’d mention a famous proponent of the Yes camp, S.N. Goenka who believed that one can practice the core teachings of the Buddha while continuing to be a practitioner of another religion. I am not sure if his idea of such practice meets your or ...


2

Here are some differences between Buddhism, and Hinduism and Jainism: The middle way between eternalism and annihilationism (both Hinduism and Jainism subscribe to eternalism of the self) - see this answer The middle way between asceticism and indulgence (Jainism tends towards asceticism) - see this answer The self is not eternal, not standalone and not ...


2

Your question already implies differences in practice between your variation of Hinduism and what Buddhism you have practiced. On these issues you will have to choose. When it comes to doctrine too, you will have to be clear in your mind. The very word dharma means something very different in Brahmanical Hinduism vs. Buddhism. There are differences in the ...


2

This is a very good question. Ven. Thanissaro translated SN 36.21 as saying very clearly below that not everything that happens to us is caused by that which was done before. The sutta gives examples like bile, weather, harsh treatment etc. As you have said correctly, MN 101 reinforces the message of SN 36.21. So any brahmans & contemplatives who are of ...


2

VARDHAMANA -- Vardhamana was born in 599 BCE in Kudagrama near Vaisali in Bihar. He died of at the age of 72 in 527 BCE at Pavapuri near Rajagriha. GAUTAMA BUDDHA -- Gautama Buddaha was born in Lumbini near Kapilavastu in the foothills of Nepal in 567 BCE. The Buddha died in 487 BCE in kushinagar at the age of 80.


2

The reason (and ethics) for this is found in the meditation practice regarding states of mind and their underlying intentions (cetana). There's no unwholesome intentions present when accepting and eating meat unless one intentionally accepts and eats meat with the purpose of killing animals. I can't imagine any monk doing that. When killing another living ...


1

theyre not complicit in the negativity of murdering or trading of murdered animals because they are begging for any type of food. it is only up to others to associate with murdering or trading of murdered animals. if a monk notices a habit in others developing of associating with those things the monk may request they cease associating with those ...


1

It appears that Mahavira was a slightly older generation, not quite contemporary. Wikipedia says, It is believed that Mahavira was born in early part of the 6th-century BC ... He preached for 30 years, and is believed by Jains to have died in the 6th-century BC. Outside the Jain tradition, scholars such as Karl Potter consider his biographical details as ...


1

Here is the answer given by Lord Buddha to a similar matter... There were many religious groups and cults in India at Lord Buddha's time and almost each had their own signature practices, Some were naked,Some were living like animals (Cows,Dogs) and many more.All of them had one purpose, Finding the end. There was a group who said to their followers "You ...


1

You may get close, but so long you believe in the concept of an everlasting soul (i.e atman), you will not achieve what the Buddha called the ultimate cessation of suffering, because of the clinging to the Self which arises in conjunction with this belief. Remember: the Buddha spoke of four types of clinging. Clinging to sensual pleasures, clinging to views,...


1

In order to answer these questions, you need to understand the Dhamma Differences in Hinduism and Buddhism. In DN1/ Digha Nikaya 1, Buddha expounded the differences between the dhamma that he teached and the dhamma of the brahmins/hinduism. My answer is that, you need to find this yourself. but to tell you the truth, it's not possible.


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As to your title question, MN27 - http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/mn/mn.027.than.html gives an account how every achievement before Nibbana, is no thing more than a clue as to the accuracy of the Buddha's insight. Prior to the attainment of arahantship, 'Truth' is not to be realised. Practicing the same thing over and over again does make the mind '...


1

Wisdom and the faith inspired by it is 3 folds: what is learned what is logically deduced what is experienced Until you have experienced you will not know for sure. The real truth is revealed to you through your Vipassana meditation. Brahmajala Sutta discusses instances where false ideas arose through misinterpreting experiences, some being meditative. ...


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