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4 votes

What is the difference and relation between chanda and cetana?

OP: What is the difference between chanda and cetana? Chanda is the desire to act. E.g. if you stand from a seat you have to have the "intention" to do it, but can choose not to if you want A ...
Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena's user avatar
4 votes

Did the Buddha have intention (cetana)?

Arahants don't have karmic intentions and they don't seek any results. They have higher wisdom, higher goodness, higher intelligence that is not possible to measure or described by the ordinary way of ...
Murathan1's user avatar
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4 votes
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Does imagination also create kamma?

Mental activity is, too, a type of activity. This includes thinking, imagination, mulling over ideas, cultivating certain mind states and suppressing others. Repeated thinking on some topic (including ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
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4 votes

Not wanting to meditate = bad karma?

The Pali suttas say bad thoughts arise from the three wrong actions rather than from not meditating. Therefore, it is probably best to work on right view about morality. And what is the nutriment for ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
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4 votes

If I imagine doing a thing, then do I intend it?

AN 6.63 says "kamma is intention" and there are three types of kamma, namely, mental kamma, verbal kamma & bodily kamma. Therefore, if an object/subject of imagination is pursed mentally ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
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3 votes
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Judges passing the death sentence

Yes, and it's good to compare it to that quoted story, as many think that for a "higher, nobler" aim, doing wrong is ok. Or out of duties, like moderators and "responsible" often think. Not only ...
Samana Johann's user avatar
3 votes

Did the Buddha have intention (cetana)?

I'm just adding this here for completeness, but I won't accept my own answer. “Bhikkhus, what one intends, and what one plans, and whatever one has a tendency towards (yañca ceteti yañca ...
ruben2020's user avatar
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3 votes
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Did the Buddha have intention (cetana)?

OP: After attaining Nibbana, did the Buddha still have intention (Cetanā)? Yes, Lord Buddha still has intention (Cetanā) after attaining sopadhishesa-nibbana. But after attaining anupadhishesa-...
Damith's user avatar
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3 votes

Did the Buddha have intention (cetana)?

Well yeah, that impulse to go to a certain place is an example of intention. However, intention to sit in meditation, is like intention of nothing, it is an intention of dispassion, of suchness. It is ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
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3 votes

What is the difference between householder and renunciation equanimity?

It's good to get aware of issues of different kind of equanimity not only because most modern, especially lay teacher, even whole "schools" actually teach the dangerous "household-...
Samana Johann's user avatar
3 votes
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What does Buddhism teach about healing others through the mind

What happens when we aren't attentively listening, and then we see someone who attentively tries to listen to something? It's natural if we would begin to listen attentively too. So our behavior and ...
chang zhao's user avatar
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2 votes

Lies as self defence vs. Physical self defence

I would consider the fourth precept on musavada (lying) in Buddha Dhamma to include all abuses done by speech. That would also include harsh speech, slander, and gossip which will harm oneself and ...
Saptha Visuddhi's user avatar
2 votes

Bad behavior (and therefore bad kamma?) due to physical ailments

In abhidhamma.- There are 4 type of minds: wholesome-root functional mind, good kamma. unwholesome-root functional mind, bad kamma. root's effect functional mind, kamma's fruit. rootless functional ...
Bonn's user avatar
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2 votes

Lies as self defence vs. Physical self defence

The key is intent to deceive and the person understanding the deceptive communication. If the intention to deceive is not there then there is no unwholesome. If you mistakenly believe something and ...
Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena's user avatar
2 votes
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Intent and Karmic benefit

While the act of saving someone's life does bring great overall benefits to the person's future lives, his intent does influence the orientation of such wholesome rewards. For example, a person ...
santa100's user avatar
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2 votes

What is the sutta where the Buddha says that one breath or one bite of food is the proper timeframe with which to contemplate life/death?

I found the sutta I was looking for: https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an06/an06.019.than.html It's AN 6.19.
Peter Charland's user avatar
2 votes
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What is the source and meaning of this quote of the Buddha's: "Everything rests upon the tip of intention"?

It may be helpful to study AN3.61, in which the Buddha teaches us to be careful about thoughts concerning "everything": AN3.61:1.1: “Mendicants, these three sectarian tenets—as pursued, ...
OyaMist's user avatar
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2 votes
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Does there exist a historical-critical study ("Higher Criticism") of Buddhists’ texts?

The book entitled "The Authenticity of the Early Buddhist Texts" by Venerables Sujato and Brahmali is the best starting place for an overview of academic studies on the Pali Sutta Pitaka. ...
ruben2020's user avatar
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2 votes

If I imagine doing a thing, then do I intend it?

It is very clear from the suttas that mental deeds are more important than verbal or physical deeds. All deeds have intention. “Of the three deeds thus analyzed and differentiated, which deed do you ...
ruben2020's user avatar
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2 votes
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If I imagine doing a thing, then do I intend it?

Question: If any unskillful thought arises and you acknowledge it as unskillful, does it still have negative kammic effects? Thanissaro Bhikkhu: No. Question: In other words, does the arising of ...
Antony Woods's user avatar
1 vote

Not wanting to meditate = bad karma?

what would be acting to prevent one from meditating are things like habits, naivety, laziness, misperception of low things being meaningful things, etcetc these are the things that actually perform ...
bw tho's user avatar
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1 vote

Morally unwholesome deeds knowing the consequences but without unwholesome intentions

I think the doctrine says there are three unwholesome roots: i.e. passion, aversion -- and ignorance (or delusion). It's also possible to do things accidentally -- but that's not what you're asking ...
ChrisW's user avatar
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1 vote

What is the difference and relation between chanda and cetana?

Remember my answer about the attention/association process? There I explained how our attention works under the hood as a cyclic association process with feedback. Remember, how the new associations ...
Andriy Volkov's user avatar
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1 vote

What is the difference and relation between chanda and cetana?

When a puthujjana man sees a beautiful girl/lady, a passion or love brews in his heart. This motivating 'passion' or 'love' can be compared to 'chanda'. Similarly, when the inner urge to end ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
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1 vote

Is Intention a sankhara?

1) In the aggregates, 'sankhara' are kammic formations. Mmmm... I wouldn't say that. All "kammic formations" are "sankhara" but not all sankhara are kammic formations. For example, a Buddha has ...
Dhamma Dhatu's user avatar
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1 vote
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Is Intention a sankhara?

1) In the aggregates, 'sankhara' are kammic formations. Yes. Sankhara creates future results. So karmaic results are due to Sankhara. Sankhara is like the seed which germinates into the result. 2) ...
Suminda Sirinath S. Dharmasena's user avatar

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