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OP: What is the difference between chanda and cetana? Chanda is the desire to act. E.g. if you stand from a seat you have to have the "intention" to do it, but can choose not to if you want A Comprehensive Manual of Abhidhamma Cetana is volition. This is what makes you commit a certain course of action to realise a goal or a wish. E.g. I a feeling hungry ...


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Arahants don't have karmic intentions and they don't seek any results. They have higher wisdom, higher goodness, higher intelligence that is not possible to measure or described by the ordinary way of thinking. The cause of their actions are not connected to any ordinary human intention, desire or mind state but it happens out of complete purity and wisdom ...


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Mental activity is, too, a type of activity. This includes thinking, imagination, mulling over ideas, cultivating certain mind states and suppressing others. Repeated thinking on some topic (including imagination) habituates the mind to that theme. Habituation affects the mind's tendencies and dispositions. Metta meditation works by changing the mind's ...


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The Pali suttas say bad thoughts arise from the three wrong actions rather than from not meditating. Therefore, it is probably best to work on right view about morality. And what is the nutriment for the five hindrances? It should be said: the three kinds of misconduct. https://legacy.suttacentral.net/en/an10.61


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Yes, and it's good to compare it to that quoted story, as many think that for a "higher, nobler" aim, doing wrong is ok. Or out of duties, like moderators and "responsible" often think. Not only doing by oneself, but also order by words or sign and mental approve (which is the heaviest) are the doors of action (kamma). Not even the judge, but also those ...


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I'm just adding this here for completeness, but I won't accept my own answer. “Bhikkhus, what one intends, and what one plans, and whatever one has a tendency towards (yañca ceteti yañca pakappeti yañca anuseti): this becomes a basis for the maintenance of consciousness." “If, bhikkhus, one does not intend, and one does not plan, but one still ...


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OP: After attaining Nibbana, did the Buddha still have intention (Cetanā)? Yes, Lord Buddha still has intention (Cetanā) after attaining sopadhishesa-nibbana. But after attaining anupadhishesa-nibbana , everything including intention will be ceased without remainder. Intention (Cetanā) is one of seven universal mental factors which can be seen in every ...


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Well yeah, that impulse to go to a certain place is an example of intention. However, intention to sit in meditation, is like intention of nothing, it is an intention of dispassion, of suchness. It is not an intention to get some object or attain some goal. As that quote says, the intention shapes our mind to become what one intends, but if one intends on ...


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It's good to get aware of issues of different kind of equanimity not only because most modern, especially lay teacher, even whole "schools" actually teach the dangerous "household-equanimity". The differernt is btw. actually drawn out in the notes and also in the translators intoduction of the sutta: A person who "has not conquered ...


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What happens when we aren't attentively listening, and then we see someone who attentively tries to listen to something? It's natural if we would begin to listen attentively too. So our behavior and states of mind influence others, and are influenced by others. Therefore, having clear and calm mind can benefit others around us. It happened that entering a ...


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I would consider the fourth precept on musavada (lying) in Buddha Dhamma to include all abuses done by speech. That would also include harsh speech, slander, and gossip which will harm oneself and others. When one truly understands Buddha Dhamma, i.e., the nature of this world as embodied in anicca, dukkha, anatta, one sees that these precepts come out ...


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In abhidhamma.- There are 4 type of minds: wholesome-root functional mind, good kamma. unwholesome-root functional mind, bad kamma. root's effect functional mind, kamma's fruit. rootless functional mind, neither kamma nor fruit. In one's life process: human born just by wholesome kamma, but some organ, i.e. cyst, can arise by unwholesome kamma after born....


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I can only define this from a Theravada perspective, that being: intention is the energizing of action which comes about through sensory stimulation. In that way, it could be seen as 'directed conscious energy' because, in Theravada, they often use the six-sense consciousnesses model. For instance, an object impedes the eye, a feeling/perception initiates ...


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The key is intent to deceive and the person understanding the deceptive communication. If the intention to deceive is not there then there is no unwholesome. If you mistakenly believe something and say this it is not breaking the precept of lying because there is no intention to deceive. Generally, people do not like being deceived, even for their own good. ...


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what would be acting to prevent one from meditating are things like habits, naivety, laziness, misperception of low things being meaningful things, etcetc these are the things that actually perform functions to prevent intending to meditate, as opposed to the simple fact of the absence of someone meditating which isnt an action therefore not producing ...


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I think the doctrine says there are three unwholesome roots: i.e. passion, aversion -- and ignorance (or delusion). It's also possible to do things accidentally -- but that's not what you're asking about. See also e.g. this answer about lying -- but maybe that's not without passion, nor considered "objectively immoral", nor without consequences. It's hard ...


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Remember my answer about the attention/association process? There I explained how our attention works under the hood as a cyclic association process with feedback. Remember, how the new associations either support or crowd out the current topic? Cetana is exactly that in-the-moment "incline" in the cyclic association process, in some direction, that shifts ...


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When a puthujjana man sees a beautiful girl/lady, a passion or love brews in his heart. This motivating 'passion' or 'love' can be compared to 'chanda'. Similarly, when the inner urge to end suffering manifests or the liberation & joy of The Path is experienced, a similar 'passion' or 'love' manifests. These are 'chanda'. 'Intention' includes making ...


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1) In the aggregates, 'sankhara' are kammic formations. Mmmm... I wouldn't say that. All "kammic formations" are "sankhara" but not all sankhara are kammic formations. For example, a Buddha has sankhara aggregate operating (SN 22.85) but I wouldn't call it "kammic". 2) Kammic formations are any phenomena that have an underlying intention, and therefore ...


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1) In the aggregates, 'sankhara' are kammic formations. Yes. Sankhara creates future results. So karmaic results are due to Sankhara. Sankhara is like the seed which germinates into the result. 2) Kammic formations are any phenomena that have an underlying intention, and therefore create new kamma. Intention decides which of the 121/89 mind states arise....


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The word for joy in AN 1.11 is "pamojja": Pāmojja (p. 454) Pāmojja Pāmojja=pāmujja Pāmujja (p. 453) Pāmujja Pāmujja (nt.) [grd. form. tr. pa+mud, see similar forms under pāmokkha] delight, joy, happiness; often combd with pīti. -- D i.72, 196; S iii.134; iv.78=351; v.156, 398; A iii.21; v.1 sq., 311 sq., 339, 349; Sn 256; Nett 29; DA i.217; ...


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(E) Therein, what are the 6 kinds of equanimity of the household life (cha gehasitā upekkhā)? (25) On seeing a form with the eye, equanimity arises in a foolish, confused, worlding, in an untutored worldling who has not conquered his limitations nor conquered his karmic fruits, who sees not danger. Such an equanimity as this does not ...


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One way to approach the question is from the perspective of meditative practice. This answer is based on my meditative experience and discussion with Theravada teachers. It's important to keep in mind that the Buddha was not teaching meditative practice to householders, it was for renunciants alone. So the renunciant equanimity is an equanimity which arises ...


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Here is my interpretation of what's written in that sutta. Householder equanimity is clueless equanimity. It is equanimity of someone who does not realize the three marks of existence and the three types of suffering. Basically, equanimity of a fool who does not realize the house is burning. Buddhist equanimity comes in a different sequence altogether. First,...


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If his cyst was caused by past kamma, and if his bad behavior is caused by the presence of the cyst, then this implies that his present behavior is caused by his past kamma and he has no control of it. Is that true? Kamma is intention (AN 6.63). The cyst is not caused by past kamma because the boy never intended to have a cyst. If his bad behavior ...


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If what you say is true (that "physical self-defence" is permitted), perhaps one consideration might be that that is to do with the order's good reputation versus bringing the order into disrepute? For example if you're a member of the lay community, which do you think is better: monks who defend themselves physically when attacked; or, monks who tell lies ...


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Apart from the intention to deceive, as Suminda states, there is also not 'treating this as this', but rather 'treating this as that and that as this', which is creating/forcing delusion onto the person you lie to. To give an example - say your friend currently feels negatively about you for some reason (and you are not fully aware of their state of mind). ...


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