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Imagine you were looking for Nirvana, Enlightenment, Liberation - whatever you want to call it. As a rational man you are, you would think logically: Regardless of what Nirvana actually is (whatever it is), could it be that once I attain it, it would somehow end or expel me against my will? Could it be taken away from me? If it were that way, it would not be ...


4

All compounded and/ or conditioned things are impermanent or changing. This applies to the five aggregates, physical objects, matter, energy, physical space, time, most mental concepts and ideas etc. All matter can be broken down to energy. Energy can be converted to matter. That we know from Einstein's E=mc2. Matter can convert into different forms and so ...


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The materialistic mindset invented language built around the key notion of objects. Objects are represented by nouns. In contrast to that, the spiritual mindset or the mind-over-matter mindset came up with the concept of dharma as its primary building block. Dharmas are not nouns because they are not objects. Instead, dharmas are adjectives because they ...


2

What is the difference between a "conditioned thing" and an "unconditioned thing"? A conditioned thing relies on another thing for its existence. All things are conditioned things, except Nibbana. Nibbana is an element of nature, which is the element of perfect peace. How does that difference give meaning to the 3 marks? The 3 marks ...


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I'll give the answer according to the Madhyamaka which is notably different from some of the answers given according to the Theravada above. What is the difference between a "conditioned thing" and an "unconditioned thing"? A compounded thing is an object known by an awareness that is produced and functions. An uncompounded thing is ...


1

How does this meaning point towards "the end of suffering"? It implies that something (a dhamma) that is non-self, and which is non-created or not 'fabricated' -- i.e. nibanna -- is neither anicca or dukkha. See also this topic -- What is the basis? -- where I asked whether for example non-remorse might be permanent. I thought that especially the ...


1

The word "dhamma" has many meanings in the Pali Canon, as seen in this SuttaCentral dictionary entry. The "dhamma" you are referring to from the Satipatthana Sutta is most likely referring to: a constituent of experience; an aspect or quality of existence; physical sensation; a mental state or quality (good or bad); (sometimes merely) ...


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Light is movement of photons which vibrate within a certain frequency range and travel at the speed of light. If there there is no one present with eyes to sense light, is there still light? I would say yes. Nibbana is a permanent phenomena (dhamma) which is like light. Even if there are no enlightened ones to experience it, it is still there. From MN 49 ...


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