7

I am not sure we should worship statues itself as that would be some sort of idolatry. Buddhists worship Buddha, and statue or other image is just symbol, something that bring into our memory good qualities of Buddha. It's mindfulness of Buddha. Statue is a symbol, and symbol is communication which states about its subject, Buddha in our case. Thus, showing ...


7

Nagas are serpent like creatures that are also identified with dragons. I'm aware of a couple of places within Buddhism that these appear but there are undoubtedly a lot more. The Buddhist philosopher and Mahayana pioneer Nagarjuna is reputed to have recovered the Perfection of Wisdom sutras from the Nagas. He then went on to distribute the sutras to the ...


6

As @ChrisW linked above, there are many representations of the Buddha in his emaciated state, such as and . From the book Buddhist Art and Architecture by Robert E. Fisher, a brief mention of this style of portraying the Buddha is found on page 47 when discussing contrast between Roman and Indian styles of portraying the Buddha in art in the Gandhara ...


5

Well there are more than one meaning to the lotus image. It is a multi-layered symbol. http://buddhists.org/buddhist-symbols/the-meaning-of-the-lotus-flower-in-buddhism/ the meaning of the muddy waters, physicality being the ground out of which the nirvana experience grows. The lotus flower represents one symbol of fortune in Buddhism. It grows in ...


5

@konrad01 got it pretty close, the Buddhas symbolize various ways Dharma is presented in each of the six realms, expressed so as to match mental disposition of the realm's beings. If you look carefully, on most depictions of Bhava-Chakra the Buddha in each realm holds a different object in his hands. That is the key. in Hell realm Buddha holds a cup of ...


5

Okay, I did my own research and here is what I've come up with so far. Interestingly, the artist is making a reference to this Pali suttra: "Monks, suppose that this great earth were totally covered with water, and a man were to toss a yoke with a single hole there. A wind from the east would push it west, a wind from the west would push it east. A ...


5

Thanissaro says in many places that the act of respect develops hand-in-hand with learning the path: In their eyes, the religious attitude of respect is needed for any philosophical understanding to grow. And as far as they're concerned, there's no conflict between the two. In fact, they're mutually reinforcing. Opening the Door to the Dhamma: ...


5

Because it is not the middle way. Representing the Buddha as emaciated is likely to lead others to fast like the Buddha, thereby repeating his follies. The representation of the Buddha is not primarily a representation of the human or of history alone, but of the realized wisdom of a Buddha.


5

Intentions matter. Only people and cultures take offense. The Dharma doesn't take offense. Awakened ones who have gone forth to become the Dharma can't take offense. In certain strictly Buddhist cultures such as Sri Lanka, Burma, Thailand and Tibet, I'd expect to see a strong reaction, including jail time. In non-Buddhist cultures, it won't matter to the ...


5

The question isn't just whether the hair represent the snails, but what do the 108 snails present. Recall that Buddhism heavily utilize symbolism to convey it's message. It doesn't mean that the historical Buddha actually had snails on his head. The number 108 represents the 108 mental afflictions. http://mrob.com/pub/epist/buddhism.html In traditional ...


4

The true Buddha is the Eternal Buddha revealed in the Lotus Sutra. It is not a normal human being. The statue serves as a tool for remembrance, but it's actually an inferior symbol, because it depicts the bodily form of the Buddha. A scroll with written characters is better. A Sutra (text) is more similar to the true Buddha-body than a statue of Siddharta ...


4

No one should worship any Statue, in death bed Lord Buddha says not to build any statue of him. More over He had been saying this all his life that his path is the path of practice not worship. Now comes your Question why should we worship him ? Once a king denied to worship a statue, then swami vivekananda asked him to spit on one his fathers portrait, ...


4

The lotus flower blooms in muddy water and spreads its leaves and petals out just centimeters above the surface of the dirty water. Buddhist renunciates, saw themselves as being outside of the muck of the world they had renounced, or at least, in the mud but not dirtied by it.


4

Swastica is an ancient symbol of sun, rotation, wheel, cyclic activity esp. in nature, and by extension -- eternity. When German Nazis adopted a then-emerging theory of racial superiority of Germans, finding it well suiting their political goals, they took swastika as a symbol of their supposed identity with the Aryan race, and, more generally, inherent ...


3

Buddha is said to have had 32 major physical characteristics, and the second feature among them is named, heṭ­ṭhāpāda­ta­lesu cakkāni jātāni honti DN30 This means, on the soles of Buddha's feet there's a wheel sign with thousand spokes. According to commentaries, this wheel sign is said to have accompanied by 108 sub features, and Swastika is the first of ...


3

There is no reason we have to. There is also no reason I have to. Plus there also is the same reason you don't have to either. Since you have free will, you can choose to do so however.


3

No one worshiping Buddha in India, We just ignite candle only . And so if we gonna experiencing just observe, you'll see Buddha's statue, his face there's lighted spirit, you'll not find with other gods, only Buddha's eyes are closed and peaceful spirit on face. Peaceful atmosphere you'll feel. Worshiping means bribe from devotee and want praise through ...


3

Buddha is a Sanskrit word meaning knowledge. Thus a statue of Buddha is a personification of knowledge. Buddhists do not pray to Knowledge (Buddha statue). They venerate knowledge because 'knowledge is power'; they pursuit knowledge. Theists hope to get power by praying. Teaching of Lord Buddha (Budda is a statue) is for practice, diligent strenous practice,...


3

Lets say the Buddha was alive today and you offered Dana to the Buddha. But what if the Buddha does not accept it? Will you still not get the merits for your good intentions and the effort you put into preparing the Dana for the Buddha? It's about the quality of your thoughts throughout the time you spent on it.


3

His ears are long like lotus petals. The Buddha have The 32 Signs of a Great Man and The 80 secondary characteristics. This is one of the 80 minor Characteristics as the the comment by Ven. @yuttadhammo. For further details see: Physical characteristics of the Buddha and Lakkhana Sutta


3

UPDATE: The earlobes are elongated, partly to indicate the Buddha is all-hearing and partly as a reminder of the heavy earrings that weighed them down before Siddhartha renounced material things to seek enlightenment. ref: http://www.straightdope.com/columns/read/2714/why-do-statues-of-buddha-have-long-earlobes Ah ha, the Ears reference comes from ...


3

If I can give an answer with reference to 5 Buddha mandala as I think it draws together the iconography into a satisfying whole. As it's name suggests the 5 Buddha mandala 5 Buddhas at each compass point with one at the center. Each Buddha displays their own mudra. Each mudra points to a quality of that Buddha and thus to a quality of the enlightenment ...


3

According to Dr. Robert Thurman: The mudra “is a sacred gesture symbolically expressing inner wisdom, or, in tantra, a female consort for yogic practices that harness sexual energies to the path. Some of the main gestures we see in Tibetan images are abhaya, the gesture of fearlessness, the right hand held in from with open palm raised up: dana, ...


3

One of those pictures is shown on this page: Lhabab Duchen – the Day Buddha Descended from Tushita Heavens: This article from Bhutan Journals describes the iconography of the Buddha Shakyamuni Descending from Tushita Heavens to the Earth. A version of this story is told/included in the Dhammapada-aṭṭhakathā (verse 181): On return from the Tavatimsa ...


3

That is in harmony with nonviolent Buddhism however on a vipassana retreat there is noble silence, and anything worn that said anything would be as distracting as spoken words.


3

Just to add to the above, it is unknown what the historical Buddha looked like, and it is a matter of debate if he was, indeed, one particular person. There are conjectures based on the Suttas and so on, but none of those are essentially good enough to make a strong conclusion on the subject. So the ordinary response has been to make him look like whatever ...


3

Buddha didn't shave his hair like a monk, as a teacher doesn't wear uniform when students do, in school. Buddha has deep blue hair, 绀青色 similar to ultramarine, his hair naturally curled clockwise, harmonized with the spinning of the universal energy. In fact the Buddha statues in ancient China are made with strict proportions, with support from the Sutras. ...


3

What scenes are depicted? On the side with text: The place where Shakyamuni Tathagata Lord Buddha was born. The place where Shakyamuni Tathagata Lord Buddha awakened to the unexcelled right self-awakening. The place where Shakyamuni Tathagata Lord Buddha set rolling the unexcelled wheel of Dhamma. The place where Shakyamuni Tathagata Lord Buddha totally ...


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