7

In Theravada Buddhism, there are two holidays I can think of that are related to giving: the kathina robe making and the day after the rains is over, called in Thailand devorohana (descending of the lord). Kathina Kathina refers to the frame used to make a robe in the time of the Buddha. After the rains, the monks would gather together cloth they had found ...


7

There are Uposatha days, wherein one makes increased effort at following precepts (either being more conscientious of the five precepts or temporarily adopting the eight). I gather that there is often more deliberate meditation or study as well on these days, in addition to precept following: It is usual for lay people to go to the local monastery and to ...


7

Whatever the monk said on Facebook needs to be looked in context and should not be taken at face value. You will get that context only from that monk and hence I will not comment on what he said. Now coming to Christmas. It is the birth of a great saint Jesus Christ. Now one can surely celebrate the birthday of a saint, who gave the world a message of love, ...


6

If you are concerned about what a monk or another teacher of Buddhism has said, I find it is worth knowing about the wonderful Kalama Sutta from the Anguttara Nikaya. I do not read Pali and so have only read it in English. Here is an excerpt that might help with your question: The Kalamas who were inhabitants of Kesaputta sitting on one side said to ...


5

First of all, in your question, "but pray to the Buddha" is not technically correct, as we cannot "pray" (assuming the meaning of the "pray" as praying to external being ie, god) to Buddha (He is no longer here to listen to the prays). We pay respect to Buddha (, Dhamma and Sanga). However in a way I agree with you that some people actually "pray" to Buddha. ...


4

Directly answering your question: Buddhist texts are more upset at following the wrong sort of Buddhism than for practicing two unrelated religions. Buddhist text tend to suggest that practicing other religions isn't bad per se, but useless as it won't solve the problem of suffering. Now what to do about this day off in December? For awhile I was ...


4

Here in Sri Lanka we have Dansal(alms giving stalls) on poya days. Just like how Anathapindika used to do in Buddha's time. Anyone and everyone can come and take as much as they like. I had free ice-cream on last Poson poya day. Usually they give away food items. But recently some have even started giving away phone reloads.


4

It is probably best to leave other's opinions/beliefs to them unless it is useful to your practice or directly affects your life in some way. Also, it seems like Facebook has done its job. It seems like your identification with Christmas has kicked in. Whatever positive/negative opinion I have about it and express it, it will probably affect you in some ...


2

Celebration of the "Buddhist" New Year varies by both geographic region and ethnicity in the predominantly Buddhist countries of Asia. From http://www.buddhanet.net/festival.htm: Buddhist New Year - In Theravadin countries, Thailand, Burma, Sri Lanka, Cambodia and Lao, the new year is celebrated for three days from the first full moon day in April. ...


2

Uposatha day is the day when the vinaya is recited. The vinaya is of course the list of all the rules that monastics follow. In Asia, there are well defined community practices. For example, people go to the local temple that day, or in Mahayana Buddhism, you might fast (i.e. eat vegetarian) that day, or make a stronger effort to follow the five precepts or ...


2

To quote the eminent Rev. Lovejoy - "Santa doesn't leave presents under the Bodhi Tree!" ;-) https://www.getyarn.io/yarn-clip/1dfa24e6-d8cf-48c2-9f6d-2f5eaef9209e Of course it's acceptable! If Buddha isn't merriment, then what good is it?


1

Perhaps it depends on how and why we might celebrate. The Pope himself doesn't seem to be entirely happy with how some people celebrate Christmas, Pope Francis in his Christmas homily denounces materialism (BBC) Homily of His Holiness Pope Francis (Vatican radio) There are at least a couple of comments which I admire from Matthew's answer to the question, &...


1

I've had a look around and I can't see actual Buddhist holidays that follow a Gregorian calendar. They all seem to shift around with lunar cycles. The Thai national calendar is a renumbered Gregorian calendar but the Buddhist festivals within that are lunar However I practice with the Triratna Buddhist community in the UK and we have over a number of years ...


1

Parinirvana day is celebrated in my Sangha (Triratna) and I believe some East Asian Buddhist communities. It's the full moon that is nearest to the time of the Buddha's death or parinirvana. The tradition goes that the Buddha attained enlightenment or nirvana when he was a youngish man (around thirty). He elected to continue as part of the world spreading ...


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