21

While "Buddhism" is already quite a difficult terminus, since there is a host of sects, schools, vehicles and apart from that another host of indigenous practices that infiltrated Buddhism in places it went to, "Hinduism" is even more difficult. Just an overview: The Vedas are the oldest scriptures of India, dating back to somewhen between 1800 BC and say ...


10

The original Vedas themselves have little that a Buddhist would consider "wisdom", I think, being comprised mainly of battle hymns, sacrificial procedures, and ceremony. They are mentioned often in the Pali texts, e.g.: 13.‘Well then, Vaseṭṭha, what about the early sages of those Brahmins learned in the Three Vedas, the makers of the mantras, the ...


9

Because Buddhism denies the notion of "self" it does not have a concept of Avatar, as someone literally being a reincarnation of e.g. Ananda (Buddha's favorite student). Tibetan Buddhism does have a notion of Tulku though, which is similar. Tulku is a new person that inherits the life stories and responsibilities of a previous person. This is done through ...


9

I don't believe Watts's view would withstand much scrutiny from either Hindu or Buddhist scholars. Clearly Buddhism arose in a broader Hindu context, but I don't see any evidence of the former being merely an export-ready version of the latter. As described here, a fundamental difference between Hinduism and Buddhism, is that while both have extensive ...


9

Prior to the Buddha (born 563 or 480 BCE), was the historical Vedic religion (1750 - 500 BCE), followed by the shramanic movement (500 - 200 BCE), and the beginnings of the Upanishadic movement within Hinduism (500 - 200 BCE). Buddhism is also considered to be part of the shramanic movement. Vedanta came later as part of Classical Hinduism (200 BCE - 1100 CE)...


8

Of course there is connection between Lord Buddha and Hinduism! Lord Buddha grew up studying many teachings of Hinduism as well as Jainism. But he was not satisfied with the answers he was getting. He found that some of the Hinduist teachings were confusing or not applicable to practical life - and he also found that some of the Brahmin priests were corrupt ...


7

Hinduism & Yoga aren't 2 different things. They are the same. Yoga is one of the 6 main Darshanas of Hinduism. I.e it provides it's own path for liberation. Other Darshanas(Advaita, etc) too use Yoga as a valid means but not the only valid means. Can't really say Buddhism is modern. It evolved along with Yoga both of which can be traced to around 4th ...


7

Your quoted text is from M.N. Selasutta, that buddha taught to selabrahmaṇa: aggihuttamukhā yaññā sāvittī chandaso mukham. Sacrifices have the agnihotra as foremost; of meter the foremost is the Sāvitrī So, buddha didn't taught veda. Buddha just use selabrahmaṇa's knowledge, veda, to teach him the last line: puññaṃ ākaṅkhamānānaṃ, saṅgho ve ...


6

There's an interesting talk given by Bhante Sujato regarding this. (This is a very brief overview and I highly encourage you to view the full talk) According to Ven. Sujato, there are several reasons why Buddha/Buddhism is not Hindu/Hinduism: According to the best archaeological history and evidence during the time of the Buddha, Hinduism (as we would ...


6

Some forms of Mahayana Buddhism teach that Buddhas and high level Bodhisattvas are able to send out multiple forms into the world to help people called emanations, and I would say that for all intents and purposes, is basically the same as in Hinduism, although there are major differences. Mostly it is only great teachers and such who are ascribed to have ...


6

In Buddhism God is irrelevant. His existence or non existence doesn't affect the suffering that a being experiences here. Suffering is the problem that is caused by desire and attachment. Mind being the place where suffering is experienced, both Buddhism and Hinduism give the solution of controlling the mind through meditation to get rid of suffering and ...


6

In his Great Minds of the Eastern tradition lecture series Grant Hardy identifies 6 orthodox schools of Indian philosophy (Samkhya, Yoga, Nyaya, Vaisheshik, Mimāṃsā, Vedanta). He also identified 3 heterodox schools Cārvāka (materialist) Jainism Buddhism The heterodox schools are those who reject the authority of the Vedas. So based on this then ...


6

I think Nagarjuna's Mulamadhyamakakarika is the work you are looking for. Just like Brahma-sutras does not mention specific Buddhist sutras it debates with, Mulamadhyamakakarika does not mention Brahma-sutras, but it does methodically address the same points. As ancient texts go, Mulamadhyamakakarika is way too obscure to be brought in here and contrasted ...


6

In Buddhism the main teachings you have to have faith in is the 8 Fold Path divided into 3 trainings, which is to develop higher virtue, higher mind and higher wisdom. No religion is incompatible with developing higher virtue, higher mind and higher wisdom, therefore you can start practicing considering you self a Hindu. As you find parts of Buddhism ...


6

Every "official" Chan/Zen master (that is, a master recognized and authorized by an older master) keeps a list of his ancestral teachers going back all the way to the Buddha Shakyamuni. I have such list for my Zen Master for example. Every Tibetan lineage keeps a list of teachers that goes to a Buddha (not necessarily Shakyamuni). Many Tibetan texts begin ...


5

From my reading it appears he didn't oppose Vedic religion though he dismissed the Brahmins of his times as being false Brahmins. In the brāhmaṇavagga of the aṅguttara nikāya 5. 20, and the Dhp. 26 the Buddha reframes what it means to be a Brahmin, to one who is pious, celibate, free of mental defilements etc. - namely all the qualities of an arhat or other ...


5

Now this answer is about the historical development of Buddhism. In the mid of the last millenium BC there was a general movement in India, the so called Śramaṇa-movement. Cp. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sramana It was an ascetic movement whose adherents strove to find liberation from this world and the cycle of rebirths by themselves and aside from the ...


5

The Hindus had developed Samadhi (Concentration / Mastery over the Mind / Higher Mind) up to the the 8th Jhana, and also had a strong moral basis, but Buddhism went one step further and introduced Wisdom and Insight to the practice. The fact that many contemporary practitioners are strong in virtue and concentration would be the reason they manage to develop ...


5

Can one follow Hinduism and Buddhism at the same time? Theravāda branch of Buddhism (in its truest sense) is in stark contrast with Hinduism, but it may not be so for the other branches of Buddhism. It is mainly because the view of sassata is not found in Theravāda. Hinduism teaches that one possesses a soul that lives eternally. This soul is considered to ...


5

This is a modified version of the answer that I posted on Hinduism.SE comparing the Buddhist Madhyamaka (by Nagarjuna) and the Hindu Advaita Vedanta (by Adi Shankara). Usually, the emptiness in Madhyamaka is equated to Nirguna Brahman (formless attributeless God) in Advaita by Hindu scholars like Prof. Chandradhar Sharma. Prof. Sharma also equated the ...


4

In addition to what @to mentions: Buddhism differs from Hinduism. Hinduism has the notion of Atman as a central teaching. Buddhism does not. Though Hindu practices you can reach Samadhi at the most. You cannot achieve Nirvana in the Buddhist sence since it lacks Vipassana. Hence they are very different.


4

The idea of Atman tends to be defined as having three characteristics: permanent controllable satisfactory When it is any of those things, it can be seen as Atman. In SN 22.59 the Buddha explains that neither form, feeling, determination and consciousness have those characteristics: Bhikkhus, form is not-self. Were form self, then this form would not ...


4

Though Hinduism (as we call it today) and Buddhism originated in India, they are different. I am from India and a Hindu Brahmin by birth.. The Answer to the question "Is Buddhism just Hinduism stripped for export?" will be a straight "NO" from my side.. If you compare today's Hinduism with Buddhism, you would probably find no similarity at all between them....


4

Not too sure about Yoga. But I believe the core teachings of Hinduism are based on Nithya, Sukha, Athma. Which is the exact opposite of Buddhist teachings. So they are fundamentally very different. Hinduism is much more similar to Christianity and Islam at the core. Just that Christians and Muslims believe in one almighty God/Allah who takes care of ...


4

The Buddha disagreed with Vedic teaching in certain respects, but he wasn't opposed to everything. He rejected the idea that there was any sort of intrinsic value to people's Varna, or caste, and he rejected many of the teachings which had some Brahmins of the time had understood from the Vedas (For example, at the time of the Buddha, some Brahmins taught ...


4

Dyana meditation is basically keeping your focus on one object. Various forms of it can be found in many religions. There's nothing exceptional about it. Even christians/muslims praying to a God is a type of concentration meditation that could lead to the first Dyana. In that case, the object of focus is conceptual or fictional. In Buddhism also you can ...


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