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9

I hope SN 42.6 quoted below will give you comfort. A person's actions while they were alive determines their outcome, and not rituals performed after death. Then Asibandhaka’s son the chief went up to the Buddha, bowed, sat down to one side, and said to him: “Sir, there are western brahmins draped with moss who carry pitchers, immerse themselves ...


5

Along with all the excellent answers I would like to add a few cents of mine. A student asked Zen master Hakuin, What happens after we die? The Zen master replied, "I don't know." "But you're the master!" exclaimed the student. 'Yes,' said the Master, 'but I'm not a dead one.' The point is that you can never know what happens after death. The ...


3

These rituals exist for the living, not for the dead. They are designed to inspire very lazy, shameless people to try become better. In your case, looks like the medicine was too strong, for someone as sensitive as you. Relax and ignore it. Focus on basic principles: If you create harmony and peace, you and others will reap harmony and peace. If you create ...


2

For bikkhus, You can look at the vinaya, Monks’ Pācittiya 3, https://suttacentral.net/pli-tv-pvr1.2/en/horner-brahmali the buddha says that you go to hell when you slander the buddha or the noble ones, like here https://suttacentral.net/sn6.9/en/sujato https://suttacentral.net/t211.30/en/beal but for slander of a puthujjana by another puthujjana, that's ...


1

In the Theravada tradition is a practice 'reflection on the fearfulness of the states of woe'. It is practiced by doing what you are doing and it's result is that the perception of fear is established. It is a rational fear in that it is right and a natural fear of what is to be feared rightfully. It's purpose is to motivate a yogi tho, not scaring him into ...


1

I really feel like I can't be myself without feeling like I'm going to wander to hell after I've lived out my life. I'm so scared and desperate. I used to never want to settle for the ordinary, always wanting to live my life out to the fullest and working for all the pretty and nice things in life (without intentionally hurting other people) and just living ...


1

Nothing in what the Buddha taught says that one is not to enjoy righteously earned pleasures. One gives up the world at one's own pace. But the whole world recognizes (if it doesn't practice) the corrupting nature of lies, harm, theft and unrestrained self indulgence. The key idea there is 'righteously earned'. You need to develop a sense of where the line ...


1

As someone who lost my grandmother about 4 to 5 years ago. Let me share my experience to see if it can help you. "but throughout her 5-day funeral service, there were so many things to follow (offering incense, chanting etc.) to ensure she moves on" " While reciting some of the scriptures, though difficult, I briefly read something about how humans are ...


1

My original belief used to be that as long as you are a decent good person without any intentions to hurt others, you'll be fine. Yes it's good -- ethical -- to intend to be harmless. The last bit, the corollary -- i.e. that "you will be" this or that -- I treat that as being a bit unknowable: because the future doesn't exist because it may presume a ...


1

You ask for "some words of comfort and lead me back to a rational mindset". Comfort first: you're grieving for someone close to you. It's difficult and it takes time. It will be some weeks or months before you feel like your usual self, and this is natural. I'd encourage you to focus on self-care before you try to help others. Talking to a good friend ...


1

Have no fear, please read SN 55.22 for some insight from the Buddha. "Suppose a tree were leaning toward the east, slanting toward the east, inclining toward the east. When its root is cut, which way would it fall?" "In whichever way it was leaning, slanting, and inclining, Lord." "In the same way, Mahanama, a disciple of the noble ones, when ...


1

Rights and rituals cannot determine the place one is born as in Asi,bandhaka,putta Sutta. But one can offer merit to the departed. (a) offering to relatives, (b) offering to guests, (c) offering to the departed, (d) offering to the king [the government], and (e) offering to devas. Adiya Sutta Offering you ones departed relative can ...


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