Hot answers tagged

6

Easy. Well, easy in theory :) -- you need to get fed up! You need to get really sick and tired of your conditions, so sick that you cannot live like that anymore. You are so fed up that you are either ready to die - or to change your habits. So that desire to get out leads to iron intent to change.


5

Generally speaking, I think you're right. Ānanda, when one dwells contemplating gratification in things that can be clung to, craving increases. With craving as condition, [the rest of D.O. chain] comes to be…. Such is the origin of this whole mass of suffering. (SN 12.52-57, 12.60) In addition to that standard explanation that goes from enjoying to ...


5

It is not at all a simple task to reverse the habits cultivated over umpteenth lifetimes. It is next to impossible without gaining a good knowledge of the Dhamma and putting it to practice diligently. Then, and only then you are going to have any success in thwarting the mind’s ingrained habits. The personality view is the hardest of them all. If you could ...


4

In mindfulness, we try to stay in the present moment, being aware of what we are doing and experiencing right here and right now. For the most part, the things that upset us are things that happened in the past, even if the past was just 5 minutes ago. Dwelling on the past would be outside of mindfulness. A great dhamma talk I've read on this subject is ...


4

If a yard has lots of weeds, just by getting rid of the weeds alone won't be effective. One will also need to overseed their yard with strong grass so that they will overwhelm the weeds and grow into a healthy lush green lawn. Similarly, not only one needs to abandon bad habits, one'd also need to cultivate good habits so that they will "overwhelm" the bad ...


3

Although the Noble Eight-fold Path is the all-encompassing way, one often wants specific advice on "defilements". For example, searching SuttaCentral, we have AN6.58 Defilements describing six factors of dealing with defilements. Mendicants, a mendicant with six factors is worthy of offerings dedicated to the gods, worthy of hospitality, worthy of a ...


3

Paying conscious attention to whatever you are doing now fully, whatever the activity may be. Life is happening right now, right this moment as you read. Any actions have consequences, even thoughts. Unconscious activities have unknowable/unforeseeable consequences. Habits are like unconscious activities. If you are doing a good thing why don't you do it ...


3

External help like apps can be a hindrance when you get to rely on them. Even guided meditation instructions can become as you get used to them. The issue with habits is that most of the action is not strictly mindful. Having said this much of the standard advice is to systematically bring your attention to a chosen object and then to continuously keep ...


3

Well this is a suggestions question because your mileage may vary based on what you do and what's your environment. I'd suggest to use the most natural way available. The main idea here is to have a reminder in place. For this maybe you can use the entrances at your home or workplace to be a reminder. Or an action like drinking coffee or water or using the ...


2

Habits and patterns are like the water streams carving paths on earth when it rains. So when it rains again, the water follows the same paths. There's no self in the rainwater that made the paths and the rainwater that followed the existing paths. It's a process of causes and effect. If habits are self, why is it hard to get rid of them? ex: smoking, ...


2

As I read your post, and the answer given by @BlackFlam3, some ideas came to me about the question. I think it is easy to turn these spiritual practices into the focus of your worship, and thereby miss the moment. You start turning your focus to the thoughts about your thoughts. Making it into a routine is what the mind wants, as to take control away from ...


2

When we try to stop a habit we will discover a certain amount of resistance. This resistance is addiction. Addiction is very related to the Buddha's teaching. In the Mahasi method of meditation practice, we are supposed to be impartial to whatever we are experiencing, moment by moment. This lets us see just how much we are resistant to the little habits ...


2

Addiction is related to sensations (Vedana) where we crave for sensation. Habit relates to Sanna where a reactive repetitively reinforced response to a stimuli surfaces. Self recognition or identification is mainly with distortions of reality (Vipallasa) in which one conceives permanence in oneself or on is in control though this is conditione hence habitual....


2

It's more like an English language question. A habit is a routine of behavior that can be good, bad or neutral. From a Buddhist perspective, one can define addiction as clinging(Upadana) towards sensations. Addiction results in bad habits. Upadana paccaya Bhava - Paticca-samuppāda


2

Each experience can trigger your habitual response which might be followed by and intention to act. What triggers your habitual or reflexive response is and external stimuli coming in contact with your sense faculties. So what you have to see is if your intention is good or bad. If it is good follow through else try to practice some restraint. When trying ...


2

Some modern references: Conscious, preconscious, unconscious, subconscious by Piya Tan Viññāṇa (Consciousness) by Piya Tan Unconscious Views by Piya Tan The Unconscious by Piya Tan Anusaya by Piya Tan Suttas: Cetanā Sutta 1-3 There many more Tipitaka references bibliography of the essays.


2

Observation is always there. There is no need to do all this tracking. Just being able to be clear when one thought is coming and the next coming is more than enough. Then you will be able to find the peace that exists in between every thought. Do concentrated practice sessions and strengthen this awareness muscle. And then be lightly aware of your ...


2

OP: Simultaneous vipassana & samatha - in this version of the question (Yuga,naddha) Paṭipadā Sutta mention there are 4 types of practitioners: (1) “insight preceded by calm” - samatha,pubb’angama vipassanā (2) “calm preceded by insight” - vipassana,pubb’angama samatha (3) “calm coupled with insight” - samatha,vipassana,yuga.naddha (4) ...


2

If we say pleasure is bad, that would lead to the conclusion that one must practise extreme asceticism. The Buddha found that both extreme asceticism and extreme indulgence are both bad and prescribed the Middle Way through the Noble Eightfold Path. If pleasure is not bad, then what is bad? From SN 22.79: "And why do you call it 'feeling'? Because it ...


1

There are pleasures which cause no harm for others, do not require suffering of others to gain them, yet not in the sphere of the five senses. Thinking that pleasure is bad, is foolish: no progress (going forth) without pleasure. Short and hurtful for many or leaving the low realms of fight after not lasting.


1

Even something like SN 5.10 might help: But it’s only suffering that comes to be, lasts a while, then disappears. Naught but suffering comes to be, naught but suffering ceases. Ask yourself, "Would the cessation of this behaviour be associated with (or give rise to) the cessation of dukkha? Does the existence of this behaviour give rise to dukkha?" ...


1

The Noble Eightfold Path speaks about both of these. Habits = Right Effort Stop bad habits Continuing to stop bad habits Creating good habits Continuing to cultivate good Whereas Right Mindfulness involves more momentary concentration, momentary mindfulness to check up and make sure that the Right Efforts are happening. They are not mutually exclusive ...


1

I'm also interested in habits and found this text in the Samana-Mundika Sutta And what are skillful habits? Skillful bodily actions, skillful verbal actions, purity of livelihood. These are called skillful habits. What is the cause of skillful habits? Their cause, too, has been stated, and they are said to be mind-caused. Which mind? — for the mind ...


1

We are our habits. We are what we repeatedly do. So we can You focus on the issue of how we are creating suffering for ourselves because of our habits, and how we can develop new habits that create the causes for happiness. If we find ourselves engaged in unskillful habits, we’ve got to learn how to overcome those habits and replace them with more skillful ...


1

How are habits seen in buddhism - how are they explained ? Habitual tendencies persist from life to life. Say you were a monkey than then born a human sometimes the tendency to jump last. Only the Buddha can overcome habitual tendencies. Even an enlightened person will have habitual tendencies. read now about habit making - and would love to hear users ...


1

what is the difference between a habit and a addiction? Addictions are difficult to understand. I guess I'd define an addiction as being an activity (or substance) which gives you some kind of pleasure when you do it, and which you therefore do repeatedly, even though the activity isn't helpful or useful. So I suppose examples of these might include: ...


1

Am I right when I say that—in the same way—our habit patterns are obstacles that prevent/hinder us from seeing things as they really are because they fuel the fire of self? The Self itself is a habit. We only believe in a permanent separate self because we have conditioned the mind over and over and over again through infinite aeons that it's real.Habits ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible