5

Very good question, focused on real and useful problem. Mind generates aversion when things go contrary to what it believes is "right". This belief is called "attachment". For example you believe that only certain weather is good and that it should be that same weather most of the time. So the first technique is to remember this as soon ...


4

What happened to me? How those videos cause me to lost my interest for buddhism? How I lost that resistance? I suspect something you wrote points to the answer – you wrote that college work stressed you out, and these videos “helped me forget the problems.” People respond to stress in their own way, e.g. overeating, indulging in drugs or sensual pleasure, ...


3

Whatever you give frequent attention becomes the inclination of mind. This is similar to how recitation & memorizing works, as more attention is given the recall becomes easier. Video games are in the scope of sensuality and it becomes the inclination of mind. It is based on tendencies that are wrong such the perception of attractiveness in the ...


3

In Buddhism, you can choose to be a lay follower, who observes the five precepts and the non-noble version of the path (which has defilements remaining) as a lay person, or you can follow the Noble Eightfold Path of a monk who renounces the worldly life. If you choose to be a lay follower, then you obviously need a source of income and you can choose to have ...


2

Khanti/patience is indeed a very important virtue to cultivate. It's listed in Sn 2.4 as among one of the greatest protection for a practitioner. Also refer to many other related suttas. Patience, compliance, seeing contemplatives, discussing the Dhamma on timely occasions: This is the highest protection. ~~ Snp 2.4 ~~


1

At many times in our lives, the food given us is given in faith. This is certainly true of monks. It is also often true of householders who have yet to earn a living. AN7.72:11.2: Which is better—to have a strong man force your mouth open with a hot iron spike and shove in a red-hot copper ball, burning, blazing, and glowing, that burns your lips, mouth, ...


1

In the Abhidhamma, regret and remorse over the past is considered an unwholesome mental factor. Worry (kukkucca) is remorse, brooding, and repenting over evil acts done in the past or good acts left undone. The following theme for reflection from AN 5.57 (quoted below) can prevent the arising of unarisen unwholesome states. It encourages shame of evil (...


1

Talking mind is from accumulation of emotion-creating past actions & tendencies. Silent intuitive mind is a right concentration when performing what is necessary to perform. Possibly MN 19 can help in understanding the different layers of the mind. As MN 117 refers to wrong thought (resolve) vs right thought (resolve). Every human life is born with ...


1

The Satipatthana Sutta does not instruct to be aware of bodily movements. Instead, the Satipatthana Sutta instructs to know what you are doing according to the Dhamma when there are bodily movements. The Satipatthana Sutta says: Furthermore, a monks acts with situational wisdom when going out and coming back; when looking ahead and aside; when bending and ...


1

There is a difference between trying to find the answers to things you're unlikely to find answers to and seeking answers to questions that may have obtainable answers. For example, trying to imagine the beginning of life just for the sake of wanting to know and coming up with many theories is not likely to turn up answers. Getting a degree and studying the ...


1

The ordinary speed of ordinary body movements does not adversely affect the mind. In my experience, the ultra-slow methods of walking meditation do not enhance mindfulness and, in my opinion, hinder mindfulness, because it takes far more unnatural activity of mind to maintain a very slow unnatural walking pace. The original Buddhist scriptures are silent on ...


1

It seems like you have developed a method of suppression which is favoured in the Theravada tradition - under certain circumstances. This isn't bad if done correctly, but you may find that whatever is suppressed must then find the next path of least resistance, usually through our emotions which, in turn, shapes our behaviour. This might be why you feel your ...


1

Believing that good people exist is like believing that young children will mature in wisdom and intelligence. Sometimes it's hard to watch a two year old in the middle of a tantrum and think "someday this little screaming monster will be a doctor, or a saint, or someone's loving spouse", but every small child has that potential in them. Everyone ...


1

I think this world is full of good people. THE first I can think of is my parents and there are many friends. The idea of "Good" is subjective. What I call good may not be the same as what you call good. The observing five precepts is a gradual training. It can have many levels. Not killing a human is not the same as not killing a virus.


1

If we may agree that good requires the skillful, then: AN3.69:9.1: There are these three skillful roots. What three? Contentment, love, and understanding. Contentment, love, and understanding are worth cultivating for their own sake without needing to assess others. Indeed, the Buddha says quite clearly that: MN8:12.12: ‘Others will have wrong view, but ...


1

What you describe is the phenomena of the monkey-like mind, which changes more quickly than the body. From SN 12.61: “It would be better, bhikkhus, for the uninstructed worldling to take as self this body composed of the four great elements rather than the mind. For what reason? Because this body composed of the four great elements is seen standing for one ...


1

could it be because those entertainments are one of five hindrances?


1

One idea that might help is to focus more on what you can give instead of what you can acquire. You say you're worried about losing opportunity as if you want to gain or have opportunity -- have job, have relationship, "my journey", etc. Instead you might wonder, "what can I do (what option do I have) that is most helpful, ethical, generous?&...


1

To fear the opportunity of an occasion to make merits, to do not follow an arosen kusala-citta (one of non-harming, non-disputing, renouncing, giving), is what the Buddha had called something that needs really to be feared, avioded. As good householder sees here: as soon as starting to rationalize, giving doubt changes, all good gained decays, and another ...


1

"Come, bite your botty" sometimes help quick if telling angy children, or to "force" them looking, or need to look, into a mirror. Try it, when ever aversion arises.


1

The rain is cold. With too much rain we can die of exposure. Knowing a body is cold, we can shield it or take it to a dry place. The thought "I am cold" or "I am averse to cold" can be replaced with the simple thought, "there is wet. there is cold." Further thoughts can address the situation with "this is bearable" or &...


1

You reflect aversion is harmful to yourself & others; it causes stress to yourself & can even lead to physical disease, such as cancer. If you get angry at the other person in the wrong way or place, you can lose your job, etc, or get suspended by politically correct authorities. You also reflect the Buddha taught the foundational element of the ...


1

Not sure whether it is a Buddhist perspective, i would like to share few things which may be of some sense to you. Please excuse my immature writing skills. There are two streams of thoughts/ideas/concepts/feelings we are put up with in any life situation. In present case, first stream is the feeling/idea of aversion. Please don't assume i am denouncing that ...


1

Something Eckhart Tolle once said... Patience is itself an expectation. When we are being patient, it effectively means that we are experiencing something we dislike, but have decided to wait calmly in the expectation the experience will eventually dissipate. Being patient in this sense is effortful, and like all efforts it will eventually run out of steam. ...


1

From Dhammapada 184: The best moral practice is patience and forbearance; "Nibbana is Supreme", said the Buddhas. A bhikkhu does not harm others; one who harms others is not a bhikkhu. Alternative translation from here: Enduring patience is the highest austerity. "Nibbana is supreme," say the Buddhas. He is not a true monk who harms ...


1

And what’s the impatient practice? It’s when someone abuses, annoys, or argues with you, and you abuse, annoy, or argue right back at them. This is called the impatient practice. And what’s the patient practice? It’s when someone abuses, annoys, or argues with you, and you don’t abuse, annoy, or argue back at them. This is called the patient practice. An4....


1

Restraint I think that another way to frame patience is in terms of restraint. Why is this? If we see a mental defilement arise, we exercise restraint to not immediately give into it. We look at the situation and see it for what it is. In this way, we are exercising patience, but also restraint. Now what does the Buddha think of restraint? Well, Buddhist ...


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