11

Anatta means that there is no permanent self, not that there is no self at all. That would be just silly and contradict observation. Imagine the self as a car. Every day one part of the car is replaced with another. One day the right headlight, the other day the windscreen, the third day the rear left wheel. And so on. At some point, all the pieces of the ...


8

causality. Action. Reaction. Cause and effect This is agreeable with Theravada Buddhism. This is dealt in dependent origination Choice is an illusion, created between those with power, and those without Not relevant. As there is no one with absolute power nor are we puppets to some external force. Having said this. We do have some degree of choice in ...


8

Let's say you're studying pottery and throwing a vase on the potter's wheel. Your teacher comes over and says "Too thin. This will collapse in the kiln." The teacher has not predetermined the destruction of your pot, merely used his accrued experience and skill to predict an outcome. Presumably the Buddha knew enough to predict who would be a future Buddha,...


7

... I realize that I imposed my will... No you did not. The spirit (in an abstract sense!) brought you and the butterfly together. You played your role, butterfly played its. Was your intent pure? Have you felt the sacredness of the moment? Were you acting foolishly or have your weighted the possibilities? Life and death is around us and inside us all the ...


7

There were fourteen questions to which Buddha remained silent. The universe is eternal, The universe is not eternal.. were two of them. Read the following sutta. MN 63 - Cula-Malunkyovada Sutta: The Shorter Instructions to Malunkya One day a man called Malunkyaputta approached the Buddha and demanded that He explain these questions to him. He even ...


6

I think the best answer to this is in the concept of "noble silence" which is often described when the Buddha was asked such questions. Basically what it comes down to is, are you looking for answers to a lot of philosophical questions? If that's your main interest, then go to grad school in philosophy. On the other hand, if you're looking for guidance in a ...


5

If I could be as bold as to identify the viewpoint of Buddhism in terms of western philosophy, I would say Buddhist position on free will is close to that of Compatibilism (see the Wikipedia entry). Basically, on one hand, the universe can be seen as deterministic. On the other hand, our choice-making is what objectively leads to our outcomes, so even if ...


4

This is definitely one of those things you'll need to figure out by yourself: Are there events that happen without cause? If every event happens due to a cause, can universe be nondeterministic? Why is making choices critically important, whether the universe is deterministic or not? What is the difference between absolute and relative perspective? If ...


4

Do we know that some things will happen no matter what? Indeed we do! We are all going to die one day, no matter what! Humans and animals age, no matter what! If a person dies with craving/ignorance still present in the mind, he/she will be born again, no matter what! If a person commits one of the 5 great sins, he/she can't attain Nibbana within the same ...


4

If decision making is a self, why do you regret certain decisions you have made? You should be able to make all good decisions in life. Why is decision making affected by craving, aversion and ignorance? If it is a self, you should be able to disassociate it from the 3 roots of evil, at will. But you can't! That is something you need to practice and ...


4

Where we don't have a choice: stop, maintain or prolong, create phenomena and influence, control arising and passing of phenomena. Even at a grosser level the influence is limited. Where we have a choice: not being reactive to sense stimulus but proactive to it influence and regulate your mind towards skillful states and away from unwholesome states ...


4

When a person has a choice between Path A or B, on what basis would that person make that decision, for it to be the right one? For that one has to have a very good knowledge of the True Dhamma. How can one differentiate between what is the Truth and what is not. Even if there is only one path, there is a lower level and a higher level to it. How would a ...


4

Yes christian intellectuals cannot get out of their awful dichotomy free will-determinism, so when they get curious about the dhamma, they completely fail to understand it. First since you care about kamma, you can read this https://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/study/kamma.html instead of wikipedia. Second, the path is not about free will, choices, or lack ...


4

Enlightenment comes as a natural result of the meditation practise. When you practise meditation with proper effort you'll realize very quickly that this is path of freedom from suffering. So with experience a person realizes the benefits of meditation and that realization can lead the person to get involved with meditation more deeply. It is "not" ...


3

Your question basically boils down to "is there anything called free will?". There is 'will'. But it is not necessarily free. Even when you get a decision made in the courts, if the jury or the judge is influenced by politicians or corporates, can you call it a free judgment? But it's a judgement nonetheless. Likewise, our will is influenced by greed, hatred ...


3

I have no knowledge of Thai but what I think is said here is: Anatta nature is such that you cannot effect any of the aggregates by will power alone in an absolute way ever lasting way. You can stay in one posture but this is to a limited time. So you have limited influence but not absolute at a grosser level. At the level of arising and passing you have no ...


3

Buddhism tells me there is the concept of no-self (anatta) The Buddha never said there is NO SELF.He rejects annihilationism. When confronted with direct questions such as "Is there a Self?" The Buddha chooses to remain silent.It's not that there is no self but what we call "self" is not what we perceive it to be. the so called conditional self is actually ...


3

The ego has survival instincts hardwired into our bodies. These survival tendencies are what give rise to greed, ignorance and hatred. This is what creates suffering. To be conscious of this process is the aim of most Buddhist paths. This awareness itself is what gives rise to our capacity to choose something other than what our programming demands. Thus, "...


3

It is useful to believe that we do have self will to the degree that we have the capacity to do wrong. We can feed our negative energies like sloth, torpor, ill will, anger etc. By not doing wrong we automatically do right. Which is why the sila is a list of prohibitions or inactions, and not a list of mandatory actions. A notable feature of spiritual ...


3

What is it that allows to make choices? It's a complex combination of various variables, nature vs. nurture, old habit energy, one's own effort and energy, etc. That's why the 4-pronged approach of SammaPpadhana/Four Right Exertions in the other thread is a necessary tool to help one making progress on the Path. For example, to one who's never smoked ...


3

In my opinion, the Dhamma is in-between those two extremes. The Dhamma teaches us Dependent Co-arising. One's mind is not free from the influence of past conditions. What affects the aggregates in the present will influence its future state (or the state of the next group of aggregates causally derived from and connected to a past group of aggregates). In ...


2

A very good question,here is the answer. First thing about the future as to Buddhism is that it is not completely fixed or completely open. Here's an example... If you toss a coin you know It is going to fall down to earth It could give either "Head" or "Tail" (A) The coin falling down is the fixed future,the coin is influenced by a natural force that ...


2

In my opinion as Buddhism accepts the law of karma or 'what you saw is what you will reap' principle, it accepts the notion of free will. Destiny is created by the person himself.


2

First, does Buddhism teach free will? If not (and I've seen enough to suggest that this is a tenable interpretation), then there's no problem. However, if Buddhism teaches free will, then what does it mean by anatta? If by anatta it means to let go of the self (with no ontological commitments made to it one way or another), then there is no problem. ...


2

First a brief answer: DO is in operation all the time and the reason we do not yet see it is because we have the wrong view that there is a self (me) doing all this things. Then the question is: if "not I" is doing all these things even though I have the wrong view that all this things are done by me, how then does things get done by "not me"? Here DO ...


2

As I was told by my teacher: To see in 3D you have to look from two places at once. From one perspective, "I" make choices, "I" act, and "I" experience results. This is a flat view. From another perspective, there is no free-will and the universe is deterministic. Therefore, we need to surrender to things as they are. This is a flat view. The 3D view ...


2

Any perception of notion of self will not match reality 100% hence will be unsatisfactory. Through meditation you should get rid of this perception of self as this is the source of misery. If you keep pondering of self or non self at an intellectual or philosophical level you still dealing with concepts and perceptions, so this is not something you should ...


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