38

In a nut shell Buddhism revolves around the 3 trainings: Living a life of morality so we do no create misery for one self and others Developing mastery over the mind so we do not react but be proactive so we can be at peace with our selves and other Developing wisdom of your cognitive process to identify how misery is generated so we can come out of misery


16

1) It's hard to summarize Buddhism in brief without resorting to one of sometimes inaccurate or misleading summaries. A summary that starts with the Hindu-style cosmology, imho, misses the point. Also depends on the audience, i.e. do they see other religions as being different kinds of Christianity or essentially Christian heresy or as superstition. The ...


12

In addition to my comments, I quote Ajahn Brahm from his book "Mindfulness, Bliss and Beyond" The Highest Happiness The Buddha said, “Nibbāna is the highest happiness” (Dhp 203, 204). This is, perhaps, the most helpful description of enlightenment. Not only is it straightforward and lacking in gibberish, it is also very appealing. It reveals why ...


11

The truth about the Buddha, as far as I can see, was that he was disinclined to do much of anything after his enlightenment: 'With great pains have I acquired it. Enough! why should I now proclaim it? This doctrine will not be easy to understand to beings that are lost in lust and hatred. 'Given to lust, surrounded with thick darkness, they will not ...


9

Craving (lit. "thirst", tanha) is a technical term that means that very phenomenological moment when you (here!) daydream about something (over there!). Buddha says "unsatisfied craving IS dukkha" (suffering) - note how he does not say "craving is the cause of suffering", he says "unsatisfied craving IS". That's because dukkha isn't exactly "suffering", it ...


7

No, the Buddha did not wait for people to ask for help. Only at the beginning, after attaining the Buddhahood, he waited for the invitation of the Maha Brahma, to preach the Dhamma to the world. That is customary to all the Buddhas. The issue with making it a rule to wait for people to ask for help is that people rarely realize that they need help. Even ...


7

In a short piece called Right Speech by Thanissaro Bhikkhu he defines idle chatter as that "spoken with no purposeful intent at all". and he stresses the important of intention in speaking. Right speech, explained in negative terms, means avoiding four types of harmful speech: lies (words spoken with the intent of misrepresenting the truth); ...


7

Ugga, a rich layman, said in a sutta of the aṭṭhaka-nipātā (AN 8.22): With confident heart I paid homage to the Buddha. The Buddha taught me step by step (anupubbikakathā), with a talk on giving, ethical conduct, and heaven. He explained the drawbacks of sensual pleasures, so sordid and corrupt, and the benefit of renunciation. And when he knew that ...


6

Faith in Buddhism has many function. Also faith in upon which wisdon is built. Firstly you listen to the Dhamma and see that this sounds right Secondly you see this is logical when you think and analyse it Lastly you should practice and see for your self then you know that in fact it is right by direct experience hence faith becomes unshakable You might ...


6

Maybe because Clinging/Upadana is such a powerful destructive force even advanced practitioners still have a tough time dealing with. So the non-clinging theme reflected thru insight into Emptiness/Sunyata throughout the sutra would be a great way to remind us about it. That's why in many Mahayana temples, this sutra is usually recited at the end of any ...


5

Dukkha and Dosa are quite different things. Dukkha is the characteristic of being unable to give real satisfaction, and it is an attribute of all compounded things. Or in some contexts it can refer to physical or mental pain. In contrast Dosa means something like anger or hatred. Before going any further into your question though I have to make some ...


5

Contemplate here doesn't mean thinking about it intellectually. Sure we all have to think about it first but real insight happens when you realise it through direct experience.You have to experience the four noble truth not churn it through your head back and forth trying to get a sense of it.This is like contemplating how a mango tastes a hundred times ...


5

I think a brief overview of Buddha's life is an excellent way to explain Buddhism, because the listener can follow the train of observation and reasoning that led Buddha to renounce a life of ease for a difficult life as an ascetic, then wandering teacher. To me the most salient feature of Buddhism is that there is no central role for a "god". Other salient ...


5

If you know the name of the sutta, and if it's a famous sutta, then I find you can easily find it using Google, for example: This search (Google) Wikipedia too has many articles about Buddhism, and one of them describes this sutta: Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta (Wikipedia) At the end of the Wikipedia article are "External links" to translations and ...


5

If you compare suffering to a sickness, the first noble truth would be knowing that you are sick. The second noble truth would be knowing the cause of the sickness. The third noble truth would be knowing that the sickness can be cured or knowing that there's a healthy state. The fourth noble truth would be knowing how to cure it or knowing how to reach that ...


5

Perhaps its terse nature and convenience for chanting (quote from your question) is the exact reason that it is popular. I believe all the Prajnaparamita sutras point to the same thing in the same kind of way. Why wade through the perfection of wisdom in 8,000, 25,000 or even 100,000 lines when you can pop the Heart sutra in your pocket and off you ...


5

So I posed this question to my teacher at the temple yesterday, and the answer floored me! I asked her what is the meaning of "No suffering, origination, cessation of suffering, path" in the Heart Sutra, and if it was some kind of crazy wisdom. She replied: "No, this is an understanding of emptiness, that is an understanding that things are caused through ...


5

You can read about the Dharma Wheel or Dharmachakra in the article "The Dharma Wheel (Dharmachakra) Symbol in Buddhism" by Barbara O'Brien. In this article, it is stated that the Dharma Wheel is a chariot wheel and it is most commonly depicted as having eight spokes, representing the Noble Eightfold Path. What happens when a chariot wheel is turned? The ...


5

What is meant by setting the "wheel" of Dharma in motion? Why is it called a wheel? Here is my interpretation based on "things I heard here and there" (so not official): In this ancient metaphor, a human society with its traditional ways is compared with a chariot ("yana", a word that also means "marching ahead"). Presumably, some sage or a visionary sets ...


5

There are 3 types of wisdom suta-maya panna: wisdom gained by listening to others cinta-maya panna: intellectual, analytical understanding bhavana-maya panna: wisdom based on direct knowledge or meditative(Vipassana) wisdom Knowing here means the third type. When a monk preaches or when you read a sutta on your own you usually gain type 1 and type 2. ...


5

I struggle with this idea because from my perspective many great achievements and accomplishments only happen because people are driven and about things. There's no contradiction between the 4NT vs. great achievements and accomplishments. Matter of fact, the greatest achievements/accomplishments are those driven by a selfless nature: The polio vaccine - Dr. ...


5

We see this phrase in SN 56.11 (Sutta on Rolling Forth the Wheel of Dhamma, translated by Ven. Bodhi). “‘This is the noble truth of suffering’: thus, bhikkhus, in regard to things unheard before, there arose in me vision, knowledge, wisdom, true knowledge, and light. ‘Idaṃ dukkhaṃ ariyasaccan’ti me, bhikkhave, pubbe ananussutesu dhammesu cakkhuṃ udapādi, ...


4

The actual terms for the three aspects (parivaṭṭa) are: sacca - the truth kicca - that something must be done kata - that the kicca has been done The aspects for each truth are as follows: Suffering (dukkha) sacca: the knowledge that suffering is suffering kicca: the knowledge that suffering must be fully understood (pariññeyya) kata: the knowledge that ...


4

1. What are they? They are the diagnosis, description, prognosis & prescription for emotional suffering, distress and dissatisfaction. 2. Where are they found in the literature? The most succinct & direct description is found in the Discourse on Setting the Wheel of Dhamma in Motion (SN 56.11, Dhammacakkappavattana-suttaṃ). However, the most ...


4

Here is a version from the Triratna site All existence is dukkha The cause of dukkha is craving The cessation of dukkha comes with the cessation of craving There is a path that leads from dukkha - (The path most commonly associated with this is the eightfold path). Dukkha is commonly translated as suffering but the translation that I find more useful is ...


4

It may be useful to choose certain aspects of Buddhism that people can relate to such as Cause and Effect. This reminded me of the dilemma The Buddha had when he almost didn't teach The Dhamma because he thought it was too hard to grasp.But Brahma persuaded him that there some people who can understand.Perhaps the best way to approach this is by treating ...


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