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31

Very much not the case, so long as you don't engage in a No true Scotsman fallacy and say that they aren't really Buddhists unless they are also vegetarian. In some traditions it is common for a begging monk to eat whatever is put in their offering bowl, mixing it together first (see the interview with Achaan Chaa in Living Dharma). For laypeople the ...


18

From my understanding, the Buddha laid down the rule to not eat afternoon in order to reduce the burden on the laity and to help the sangha avoid a negative reputation. In the Latukikopama Sutta (MN 66) the Buddha said that there were many disadvantages to going for alms at night. that monks wandering for alms in the pitch dark of the night have ...


14

Theravada and Vajrayana Buddhists (Tibetan, SE Asian) and Japanese Mahayana Buddhists are not vegetarian. So if you don't want to be a vegetarian, there are plenty of traditions that don't bother with this rule. And as for rules, there are plenty of traditions that de-emphasize rules altogether. So that leaves East Asian Buddhism. The traditional arguments ...


14

Among my own school (Nyingma from Tibetan Buddhism), encouraging vegetarianism is a relatively recent trend, mostly grounded on the teachings of Patrul Rinpoche, who lived in the 19th century and was a vegetarian. Still, the main reason for encouraging his students to become vegetarians was mostly because he was often horrified at how teachers and self-...


14

Those monks who follow the pātimokkha (Sk. Prātimokṣa), either Mahayana or Theravada, keep this rule (or, in certain cases, a rule to eat only one meal per day). The rule is simply: 37. Should any bhikkhu chew or consume staple or non-staple food at the wrong time, it is to be confessed. The wrong time is generally understood to mean outside of the ...


12

In some of the Suttas in which the Buddha describes the gradual training leading to enlightenment there is the following stock passage: "Now, when a disciple of the noble ones is consummate in virtue in this way, guards the doors to his sense faculties in this way, knows moderation in eating in this way, is devoted to wakefulness in this way, is ...


10

I too am finding that small meals every 3-4 hours helps me meditate easier. Teachers like Ajahn Chah http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ajahn_Chah have talked about not eating after 11am or noon. But he later developed diabetes and went into a coma for a year. Diabetes often is started by huge swings of blood sugar in hypoglycemia. That is why regular meals with ...


10

Actually, in Pali Canon, Buddha suggests to his students to only eat one time a day, before noon. Among the reasons he provided, the three I remember are: Because eating required begging, not eating in the evening meant not begging at dark, which could be both dangerous for the beggar and, more importantly, scare the householders by generating all kinds of ...


10

In general, in Buddhism taking without asking would still be considered unskilful. The relevant precept is adinnādānā veramaṇī sikkhāpadaṃ samādiyāmi "I undertake the training principle of not taking the not given". There is nothing to stop someone asking for food if they are hungry. Indeed by stealing one also deprives the other of the opportunity of ...


8

Buddha said that we could eat meat under a few conditions: You cannot kill the animal You cannot ask for someone to kill a specific animal for you to eat, or suspect the animal was killed for you You cannot see the animal being killed You cannot hear the animal being killed the Buddha also said that we should not eat certain types of meat like elephants (...


8

If I am to chime in and add to the other answers. If you are a meditator not eating after noon is not a problem. You will be calming your bodily fabrication which reduces metabolism (let alone food, you will require less oxygen) When you are looking at the arising and passing away of phenomena, you will see hunger is also such a sensation, constituting ...


7

Devadatta, a relative of the Buddha, at one point attempted to cause a schism in the sangha by asking the Buddha to implement 13 ascetic rules for all monks, one of those rules being vegetarianism. The Buddha in his wisdom decided against forcing these rules on all monks and instead stated that any monk who wished to take on these rules for their practice ...


7

Kitagiri Sutta I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was wandering on a tour of Kasi with a large community of monks. There he addressed the monks: "I abstain from the night-time meal.1 As I am abstaining from the night-time meal, I sense next-to-no illness, next-to-no affliction, lightness, strength, & a comfortable abiding. Come now. You ...


7

Here's an extract from an article by Ajahn Brahm, What the Buddha Said About Eating Meat, Towards the end of the Buddha's life, his cousin Devadatta attempted to usurp the leadership of the Order of monks. In order to win support from other monks, Devadatta tried to be more strict than the Buddha and show Him up as indulgent. Devadatta proposed to the ...


6

I forgot where I heard this, because it has been many years ago: "One becomes a monk, not just to be vegetarian" You're not forced not to have meat, but if you decide to devote yourself and stay in a temple, meat isn't what is served daily. Other words, what if you sneaked out and have meat and get caught? At certain temple, they don't punish you by ...


6

I found it in the introduction to the Jatakas, which seems to be the original source: Now the Great Being, after collecting a number of scraps, sufficient, as he judged, for his sustenance, left the city by the same gate he had entered, and sitting down with his face to the east, in the shade of Pandava rock, he attempted to eat his meal. But his stomach ...


5

As far as dietary guidelines for Enlightenment, I really like the "Three Gunas" model. I feel many people these days lack fundamental intuition for what constitutes good or bad energy when it comes to eating. The Three Gunas model provides a set of guidelines that people can follow until they develop an intuitive feel for healthy eating. In their simplest ...


5

Food we eat is linked to sensations we experience. So best is to choose food which doesn't give unpleasant sensations, drowsiness, etc. Oily food leads to sleepiness. Spicy food lead to burning sensations. Meat lead to arousal. In Buddhism unlike Hinduism there is no special dietary requirements, but having a light diet which doesn't bring up discomfort ...


5

Entire books have been written on the topic, "The Great Compassion" is a good one to start with-- it is written from the pro-vegetarian standpoint. Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese Buddhists are all vegetarians. This is in part because the Bodhisattva vows from the Brahma Net Sutra, which are the vows and precepts that replaced the Indian precepts, explicitly ...


5

It will depend on the amount of physical work one does, but since you've said you work in an office, I would say one meal a day is enough for maintaining the body healthy if you have no digestive problems. I started having one normal-sized meal per day 2 years ago and I've had no problems. I'd recommend seeing what fits for you by making gradual adjustments. ...


5

My theory is that it is not wrong to directly deprive plants of their life, in order to eat them, unlike animals, because they don't have the five aggregates. In my opinion, plants do not have mental formations and consciousness although they have form, sensations and perception. Without the five aggregates, they are not sentient beings.


5

It is not Mahasi noting, but the core of the Buddha's teaching: Dependent origination(D0) and others. Depending on contact feeling arises, depending on feeling craving arises, depending on craving, clinging arises, depending on clinging becoming (this is when intention arises and action(kamma) begins. The first point is contact, don't go near food when it ...


5

This doesn't quite answer the question, but because you said "I have got some illnesses due to this too" ... I find I'm bad with sweets. After I eat a sweet biscuit, I want another! After I eat a slice of bread, I want another! Apparently some people get addicted. Consider alcohol, for example: many people are able to drink a glass or two regularly; some ...


5

The quote appears in this text. However it appears to be a Victorian-era translation of the Jâtaka without much details about the version of the original from which it was translated. BUDDHISM IN TRANSLATIONS Passages Selected from the Buddhist Sacred Books and Translated from the Original Pâli into English by Henry Clarke Warren ...


5

I think the idea of sinful or not doesn't apply to Buddhism. There are only wholesome/skillful actions and unwholesome/unskillful actions. Karma = intention. As long as you are mindful of what you're doing and your intention is to prepare a meal for nourishment, instead of causing harm in any way, cracking an egg during the meal preparation doesn't seem ...


5

Page 308 of The Patimokkha Rules Translated & Explained by Thanissaro Bhikkhu: The Mahavagga (Mv.VI.23.9-15) forbids ten kinds of flesh: that of human beings, elephants, horses, dogs, snakes, lions, tigers, leopards, bears, and hyenas. To eat human flesh entails a thullaccaya; to eat any of the other unallowable types, a dukkata. Human beings,...


4

Plants are amazingly sensitive to changes in their environments. However, there is no good evidence that they are sentient (i.e., consciously aware of what is happening to them). I suggest that whoever posted this question actually read the two pieces linked to.


4

Bhikkshu Pratimoksha As far as I know (and I verified this with a Chinese Malaysian monk), the pratimoksha is what non-Theravada monks follow. It is more or less the same but has 250 rules over the Theravada 227. The extra rules however, can be found more or less in the Theravada Culavagga or Mahavagga. (Generally known, but I did not verify) The rule on ...


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