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In a way, fear of annihilation is part of the five hindrances, for example: attachment to/desire for the continuation of sensory perception (i.e. to the physical body) resentment/bitterness toward mortality doubt in the concept of Anattā Since individualism is a central tenet of Western civilization, it can be especially hard to anticipate 2 annihilations: ...


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The Visuddhimagga or the Path of Purification by Ven. Buddhaghosa is useful for this purpose. Please see "Path of Purification (Visuddhimagga)", translated from Pali by Ven. Ñāṇamoli. It's a classic manual of Buddhist doctrine and meditation written in approximately the 5th century CE, and is considered the most important Theravada text outside the ...


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"As the mind knows that total emptiness will be the end of 'mind' or 'ego' I think the fear springs from that idea." Then simply let go of such ideas and ways of thinking about being or not-being (as both is wrong thinging). Just 'this isn't real, lasting, worthy to hold on it, make it mine.' The hindrance is simply doubt, and possible caused by ...


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In the Abhidhamma, regret and remorse over the past is considered an unwholesome mental factor. Worry (kukkucca) is remorse, brooding, and repenting over evil acts done in the past or good acts left undone. The following theme for reflection from AN 5.57 (quoted below) can prevent the arising of unarisen unwholesome states. It encourages shame of evil (...


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