3 votes

Is the emptiness of final nirvana an illusion?

This perspective on emptiness is a bit turned around. Instead of standing as an outsider looking at a supposedly empty box, imagine being inside that box. It's (perhaps) a somewhat claustrophobic ...
user avatar
  • 4,300
2 votes

Does final nirvana conventionally exist - especially in the lotus sutra?

In my experience, zen and tibetan buddhism do not claim that the self of an enlightened one can be completely non existent. In fact a zen master when asked this question might answer "Uncertain." or "...
user avatar
  • 2,973
2 votes

Seongcheol's parinirvana gatha

My understanding of this is as follows; Illusion is impure, but a water wave is beyond purity and impurity; May I be reborn in a hell to purify it and save the living beings there.
user avatar
  • 233
2 votes

In this present time, can we go to Nirvana?

Yes One of the qualities of the teaching is "Akalika" which means "Timeless". Lord Buddha directly said that the teaching is fruitful regardless of the time it is practiced in. So there is nothing ...
user avatar
  • 3,933
2 votes

Request for explanation on heart sutta

As Mishu mentioned, the oldest copy we have is in Classical Chinese. Even though many of the characters of the sutra still exist in modern Chinese and Japanese, there are subtleties that are very hard ...
user avatar
  • 1,847
2 votes

Can someone address this critique?

Very standard critique, and very confused about Buddhism. Probably too much to unload in single post but here we go. First, he does not understand what Buddhism means by "suffering". By suffering ...
user avatar
  • 55.2k
2 votes

Is there a sutta which answers where a nirvanaised consciousnesses is after death and comapres it to a fire going out?

You're probably thinking of Itivuttaka 44: This was said by the Blessed One, said by the Arahant, so I have heard: "Monks, there are these two forms of the Unbinding property. Which two? The ...
user avatar
  • 33.7k
1 vote

Is Near death experience in enlightenment true?

I believe such peculiar experiences may be significant, or may not; but in Buddhism one shouldn't cling to them. Enlightenment would involve an understanding of the three marks of existence: ...
user avatar
  • 5,403
1 vote

Can someone address this critique?

Yes, for the one who is blind Buddhism is Nihilistic. Imagine someone who has only a sense of touch, and you, having a faculty of sight, try to explain to him what the world of sight is, how would ...
user avatar
1 vote

Can someone address this critique?

Avijjā does not know the ariya-sacca, such as: Not knowing what desire is. Not knowing what suffering is. Not knowing what happiness is. Not knowing what existence is. Not knowing what non-...
user avatar
  • 2,637
1 vote

Can someone address this critique?

The main problem with the critique is that he doesn't distinguish tanha (i.e. craving or thirst) from chanda (i.e. desire, possibly wholesome desire). He therefore assumes that Buddhism is nihilist. ...
user avatar
  • 43.2k
1 vote

Request for explanation on heart sutta

You can read a very nice explanation of the Heart Sutra's emptiness teaching in Zen master Thich Nhat Hanh's writing "The Fullness of Emptiness", in which he also introduces the term "inter-being" ...
user avatar
  • 33.7k
1 vote

Request for explanation on heart sutta

Emptiness is Dependent Co-Arising. Meaning, top and bottom co-arise dependently on each other, a reference point, and a sense of direction. Self and world co-arise dependently on each other and the ...
user avatar
  • 55.2k
1 vote

Request for explanation on heart sutta

The described emptiness is not death nor unconsciousness nor coma. The verses before and after say: "Sariputra, the characteristics of the voidness of all dharmas are non-arising, non-...
user avatar
  • 2,637
1 vote

Is it complete shut down of perception and detachment of physical world?

No. If you are unconscious or in a coma then you are not laying there in a blissful state. Chances are your bodily functions are ticking over and there will be some brain activity. Just not enough ...
user avatar
1 vote

Is it complete shut down of perception and detachment of physical world?

It is a condition with no happiness or sorrow, no pain,no darkness or light,no noise or sound etc....and finally we can say "unconditional state of mind." and closer to description of "Nirvana" ...
user avatar
  • 9,578
1 vote

In this present time, can we go to Nirvana?

This Dhamma is not sterile. The Dhamma is alive. The Dhamma has the quality of “Akalika” (not belonging to time). So for those who walk this Noble Eightfold Path in an orderly manner, it is still ...
user avatar
1 vote

Whose nirvana is it anyway?

Don't look at it that way; look at it as the extinction of suffering. The problem is that Buddhism is dealing with the ineffable, so any attempt to define these phenomena will be imperfect at best ...
user avatar
  • 2,231

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible