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I don't think so. it predicates detachment from material possessions That's not enough to call it Buddhist. Buddhism might be known for what it is, rather than for what it isn't. Maybe Buddhism isn't material possessions, but, what is it? That ("what is Buddhism?") is addressed e.g. in many other topics on this site, for example: What teachings do all ...


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My question is: why would the master cries before the immolation? The "Winter" segment of the movie kind of gave the hint. Notice in this segment, after being paroled from prison for the crime of killing his wife, the now middle-age apprentice returns to the floating monastery and begins to take on the role of his previous master. And as with the movie's ...


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I’d say he’s more disappointed in himself. But either way, what’s wrong with being upset? Buddhism isn’t Vulcanism. To really practice is to face samsara with a heart that is fully open. When you do that, sometimes you’re going to cry.


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Anarchist, nonmaterialist themes do not make something Buddhist. Buddhism goes WAAAAAAAY deeper than that: actual immortality and freedom from suffering! Unless The Wings of Awakening are addressed in a movie, it is not a totally Buddhist movie. Needless to say, with these high standards, even most overtly labelled Buddhist movies are not truly Buddhist (...


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you're best if you just leave things as are 1st RULE: You DO NOT talk about FIGHT CLUB. you do not talk about zen. you do not talk about the water is wet. you just dive in..


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I think it has heavy Zen undertones if you take it in the context of the Ultimate Reality. It may also be nihilistic. This is not Buddhism per se, but it is somewhat related. IIRC, there was this guy at the convenience store who actually wanted to be a vet, but instead he was giving himself excuses not to do that course because college/tuition fees for ...


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The movie, Fight Club, and the Project Mayhem is no more or no less Buddhist than Hermann Hesse’s Novel “Siddhartha”. Please read it if you have not. Also do not forget to read “Narcissus and Goldmund” – its Christian equivalent. Just like Hermann Hesse came up with the novel “Siddhartha”, David Fincher’s Fight Club has similar undertones. For those who are ...


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