9

Of course, I can't speak for all modern-day Buddhists, but for myself, those that I have learned from, and those that I have known, we believe that Mara is the metaphorical personification of the forces that oppose enlightenment. I've not met any Buddhist who believes that Mara is a literal personal being.


7

According to Theravada Buddhism anyway, mind is different; it acts as both the receiver of the other five senses, as well as being a sense in and of itself. Meaning the mind can receive objects from any of the physical senses, but it can also receive mental objects. The reception of mental objects is different from receiving physical objects: The six ...


7

There are 5 kinds of Maras. The fifth is Devaputta Mara who is an actual being(god) who controls a portion of the paranimmita-vasavatti heaven. But he is not similar to the Satan concept in Christianity. Mara is not an eternal being. Unlike Satan, Mara is not against doing good deeds. He at times encourages beings to do good deeds and prolong their Samsara. ...


6

According to the Abhidhamma, we don't "see a car". It is a bit more complicated :-) According to the Abhidhamma, sensing involves seeing a small patch of colour. The small patch of colour is rūpa, an ultimate reality. How small is this patch of colour? Extend your arm and hold out your thumb. Scientists say that the size of your thumbnail as compared to ...


6

In the Theravada tradition, we learn Yoniso Manasikhara. It means paying wise attention. And the knowledge or vision gained by paying wise attention is called the Yathā Bhūta ñāna Dassana or the vision of manifestations in their real form.


5

I understood the question as, how to listen deeply, without imposing our will, our ego or impatience on the speaker. First we must still our mind of all chatter and impatience, which isn't possible without daily meditation and mindfulness, so we must learn to practice properly. If we are to be strong to help others, we must practice correctly. Second, we ...


5

Whenever there's a conflict between the text and your personal experience, several things could go wrong. What you think as direct insight could easily be a misjudgement on your part. ex: 500 years ago, if an average person read in a book that the earth goes around the sun or the earth is round, he would've felt such teachings go against what he took to be ...


5

In terms of how they affect the path, obviously, these are holdbacks. The goal is to get free from them. Here is the instruction I received from my teacher about this: In meditation, when memory comes up, do not replay the event that caused the pain. Do not think about it, thoughts don't help. Instead, stay with the pain itself. Feel it in your body. Stay ...


5

The Kalama Sutta says that you should "know for yourselves". It also suggests that one should consider the opinion of "the wise". Elsewhere too it's said to be important to have admirable people as friends. Something like the Sarakaani Sutta suggests that faith (faith in the "text", perhaps) is beneficial; but that it's also possible to "destroy three ...


4

In traditional Hindu use of the words Rupa and Nama (in context of ontology), Rupa meant a configuration of matter and Nama meant a spirit or an identity embodied in that configuration. For example this particular combination of wooden planks is a Rupa, while the chair it embodies is a Nama. Even if some parts of the chair can get broken and replaced making ...


4

The Supreme Buddha has said that each and everyone should be responsible for good and bad one does. According to this we can imagine the plight of this monk (I should not be calling him a disciple of the Buddha). Be it Monks or laymen, that kind of actions (because it is done in the name of Supreme Buddha’s dispensation) will amass enough demerit to suffer ...


3

The Buddha never relied on text even to record his teachings but he did rely on direct insight to get his students to Nirvana. One can't reach liberation without direct insight. Text is very conceptual and of course the Buddha taught to transcend conceptual reality because it can't be relied on to give %100 truth but direct experience can be relied on as ...


3

With reference to both the question of how one experiences or understands the experience of others and also to the end note in post by User 1167442 about the impact of realising at times we 'are full of it' and how said realisation can, if noticed, cause us to pause. My experience has been that it is when I realise and acknowledge the moments in which I am ...


3

First - You may want to change your goal - or at least temper it in the short term. How does one experience the experience of others? This requires a very high state of being, and if the ego is trying to do it in order to Be a better person Be more successful Become a better Buddhist etc. ... Then you will harm people while not intending to do so. ...


3

I think that a Buddhist answer is "There's nothing that should be viewed as self". For example I experience (or "there is a perception/recognition of") "looking at the computer screen", however "looking at the computer screen" shouldn't be viewed as "self" ... it's not permanent. The "Anatta-lakkhana ...


3

Ud 8.1 says Nibbana is a sense object (ayatana) therefore it is obviously something known. MN 26 says: Then the thought occurred to me, 'This Dhamma that I have attained is deep, hard to see, hard to realize, peaceful, refined, beyond the scope of conjecture, subtle, to-be-experienced (vedanīya) by the wise. SN 56.11 says: ‘This noble truth of ...


2

Through unity one experience the experience of others. When one does not share other's view, there is duality, my view and the other's view. If we fully understand views as just conditioned thoughts: conditioned by class, society, upbringing, books one reads, inclinations, peers, parents, teachers etc.. then we realise that our own views are just as ...


2

Am I wrong or is "beginner's mind" a Zen term that means "seeing the experience you are aware of, moment by moment, as if you have never experienced concepts before... Like you have just been born with a mind that has not developed concepts yet and so you see things as they really are? Yes, this is wrong because it has already jumped ahead into the ...


2

My dear friend in Dhamma, @UUU… I sincerely hope that you try to understand what I write. Both you and I have a lot of un-learning to do. Today a relatively small group of dhamma farers are seeing dhamma in a new light, practicing it and getting very favourable results. I joined such a group, a month ago, and experienced the same. I was able to go to the ...


2

I think it is not correct to say "seeing of the car formation". When "you" see "a car" that is nama-rupa; it is just seeing - no doer nor object. The concept of "Car" is just mind-made. Yes rupa is the experience of hardness, softness etc. But when you see a car, can you "see" the hardness, softness etc? So rupa is not the ultimate reality.


2

Mara is simply the gatekeeper of Samsara, it wants to keep all life in an endless cycle of death and rebirth without beginning or ending. This cycle is full of unresolved karma and is full of suffering. Mara wants to keep you trapped in this cycle. It wants you to listen to evil thoughts and behave badly in life so you die. It absolutely hates people trying ...


2

This is a form of Papanca or mental proliferation (If one has recollection of memories that were experiences of pain be it physical, mental, emotional, ...). At first you should try to learn what is happening at your experiential level. When there is the is contact, there is feeling, feeling coupled with perception creates a metal reaction which creates more ...


2

Not all monks are virtuous. Not all monks follow the Dhamma (teachings) & the Vinaya (social discipline). This one monk & temple will not threaten the survival of Buddhism.


2

"Do you experience presence of self now?" While thinking how to answer your question, I experience presence of self, which I know is no self ... a fabrication ... not truth. When I completely stopped thinking, there was no experience of presence of self.


2

Nobody here essentially has an experience of "non self" unless they have reached high states of enlightenment. It is very very brief otherwise. Just a few seconds, for example when you were at a very intense state of physical activity or totally involved in your work. Which isn't much is it? Our normal state right now is that our minds are convoluted. So ...


2

Your question is an interesting philosophical investigation, if you can break or crack a concept, it will bring you closer to enlightenment, at least. In fact the Gōng'àn (Jap: Koan) is doing the same thing but in the Eastern style, more intuition, and 觀. I do not think that I can answer you with a word or few sentences to define what is tathata, or ...


2

No, the Buddha lived in an age where things such as germs, atoms, nuclei, molecules, thermodynamics, neurology, etc. were unknown. This is largely irrelevant to Buddhism, though there are similarities in their values and approach. Science attempts to create theories and experiments that are independent of the human range of senses and way of thinking. The ...


1

... It seems that paths and practices are taught to people with the intent that they have the same results that the teacher did by doing that. But the teacher might have come across the practice by accident, and the teaching is simply their experience, not a principle. When I read suttas, interviews, articles, different sects' explanations and so on, there ...


1

To continue this discussion further we must have an agreement of the (Dhamm) terms "Nama", "Rupa" and "Nama-Rupa" that we are using in this Question and answers. There are three things to consider. 1). The Basic materials (Rupa Dhatu)/(particles). 2). The material creation / Form/physical phenomena- (a car)(Nama-Rupa). 3). The Perception/ Mental Formations.-...


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