9

In MN64, the Buddha discusses the conundrum of identity and the presumed immaculate innocence of infants: MN64:3.3: For a little baby doesn’t even have a concept of ‘identity’, so how could identity view possibly arise in them? MN64:3.4: Yet the underlying tendency to identity view still lies within them. And when that underlying tendency manifests: MN64:...


5

What Buddha calls 'dukkha' (suffering, dis-harmony) comes from childish, primitive thinking (and action based on such thinking). As you said, we observe interactions, we figure out patterns and regularities, and based on these we make assumptions about the world. Problem is, our observations are quite superficial, our patterns are overgeneralized, and on top ...


5

There's a confusion here between pain (or pleasure) and suffering that goes to the heart of Buddhist teachings. Yes, if I hit my thumb with a hammer I will feel pain, and that has value in teaching me to be more present and cautious when I'm hammering things. But that isn't suffering. Suffering is a purely mental phenomenon: suffering is when my mind becomes ...


5

In depersonalization and derealization disorders one recognizes a self that one is not, and that one believes one should be. This creates stress and anxiety, along with distortions of one's perception of reality. With anatta (no-self) one realizes that the egoic self is superficial, impermanent, and illusory, and loses one's attachment to it. This creates ...


4

Yes. For the Theravada tradition's stories of the elder monks and nuns, please see the following books of the Khuddaka Nikaya (the minor collection): Theragatha (Verses of the Elder Monks) or here Therigatha (Verses of the Elder Nuns) or here Thera Apadana (Past Life Legends of the Elder Monks) Theri Apadana (Past Life Legends of the Elder Nuns) For e.g. ...


3

I don’t know of any text that says “you are already enlightened.” There are ‘teachings’ by unenlightened people who do say that, because they misunderstand the nondual teachings of the yoga tantras. Perhaps what they are trying to say is that ‘you’ are not other than the enlightened wisdom activity that manifests this world. As such, but for a constant ...


3

The key to the first philosophy mentioned is the phrase "You just need to realize it", where realize carries the two possible meanings of the word: become fully aware of something; understand clearly. cause (something desired or anticipated) to happen D.T. Suzuki put it like this: We practice zazen to express our true nature, not to attain ...


3

Obviously that entire text was authored by someone else, speaking about the Buddha in the third person. In my understanding, the part about the Buddha leaving the quarreling Sangha is based on real events, while the thoughts going through Buddha's mind must be the author's conjecture. To be clear, I'm not saying Buddha did not leave the quarreling Sangha for ...


3

Possibly. For example, MN 4: Before my Awakening, when I was still an unawakened Bodhisatta, the thought occurred to me ... If anyone, when speaking rightly, were to say: 'a being not subject to delusion has appeared in the world for the benefit & happiness of many, out of sympathy for the world, for the welfare, benefit & happiness of human & ...


2

Do you see an old woman or a young one? Or can you see both? Once you've seen, can you forget how to see it? Until we see the world as it is we don't see it, but once we've seen it we cannot 'unsee'. We may fall back on old habits and patterns (old ways of seeing the world), but enlightenment (honestly) is just seeing the world as it is. It's our natural ...


2

A feeling like sadness would have to come from attachment to some sort of mental construct, right? Sadness does not come out of nowhere. For example, a regular person might think: "my mother was around since the day I was born, how can it be that she is gone forever!?" Cycling this thought and various memories over and over he or she experiences a ...


2

It's the order of nature to go along with craving according to Iti 109. And as quoted by OyaMist, even a little baby has this underlying tendency to go with craving according to MN 64. However, Gautama Buddha, like previous Buddhas before him, strove and discovered the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path that leads to the permanent end of ...


2

The unawakened Bodhisatta had dreams foretelling his future path as the Buddha in the Supina Sutta, quoted below. "Now, when the Tathagata — worthy & rightly self-awakened — was still just an unawakened bodhisatta, and this great earth was his great bed, the Himalayas, king of mountains, was his pillow, his left hand rested in the eastern sea, his ...


2

Ted's is the best answer imo. To make his point even more explicit, "You're already enlightened" means "fundamentally you already are outside the Matrix, so you don't need to go anywhere". And "purify your mind" means, "you have to stop creating karma that keeps your attention trapped inside the Matrix". And "stop ...


2

In Western traditions, evil is typically seen as personified into a being with a power similar to the power of good, locked in eternal battle over the souls of humans. However, this concept did not exist in early Judaism, which held Yahweh responsible for both good and evil. One of the oldest Hebrew texts, Isaiah states in 45:7: I form the light, and create ...


2

A somewhat hand-waving answer would be "Hell is both empty and not empty". This excerpt from Khyentse Norbu's book What Makes You Not A Buddhist would probably make things clearer: Let's say there is a cowardly man named Jack who has a phobia about snakes. Jack walks into a dimly lit room, sees a snake coiled up in the corner, and panics. In fact ...


1

'Identity-view' means immersion in an identity such that one takes the identity to be the 'real' self. An identity-view can be an identification with practically anything, positive or negative: a career or the failure to achieve one; a relationship, relationships, or the absence of such; physical beauty or ugliness; intelligence or stupidity... Anything ...


1

The Vera Sutta (AN 10.92) lists out the criteria for stream entry: Five forms of fear and animosity are stilled through the observance of the five precepts Four factors of stream entry Rightly seen and rightly ferreted out the noble method (dependent origination) The four factors of stream entry are verified confidence in the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha, as ...


1

In my view, both teachings go hand-in-hand. The first teaching explains that you are already enlightened, defining "you" as your conscience, the part of you that is already fully enlightened. Once your mind realizes this (by practicing), then your mind will coordinate with your conscience. The second teaching defines "you" as an ...


1

Just to use the natural, parallel analogy: we know how to breathe without thinking about it, but we still spend a lot of time in meditation focusing on our breath. That's because we've learned to control our breathing as an aspect of expressing thoughts, and our breathing is often affected by our emotions and our desires. The pure, simple breathing of an ...


1

I think the notion that you are already enlightened and that there is no need to strive, comes from the Mahayana teaching of Buddha Nature or tathagatagarbha, that everyone has the natural potential to become enlightened. This is apparently based on the sutta teaching about the luminous mind (pabhassara citta in Pali), which states that the mind is ...


1

You're setting up a dichotomy where none exists. What you're asking is akin to someone inquiring how Joe DiMaggio hit safely in 56 games while he was playing center for the Pistons. It's a conflation of two things that aren't causal. In your case it's a mix of ontology and methodology. Just because all beings are naturally Buddha has nothing to do with ...


1

Buddha says Nibbana is ajātaṃ abhūtaṃ akataṃ asaṅkhataṃ. Nibbana is "not born by separating from something, not a result of something prior developing or transforming into it, not made via a deed, not a result of multiple things coming together." - would be a better translation. These four are meant to exhaust all kinds of coming into existence. ...


1

Similar to Andrei's answer I note (as fact) that it's a narration of what the Buddha thought, not what he said. Going even further I might speculate that it's similar to Mother's saying to children, "While sitting in his office, Dad thought, 'Isn't it good that the children are playing quietly, and doing their homework'" -- i.e. it's said to convey ...


1

One can cling to the idea of truth without any truth or compassion One can cling to the idea of compassion without any truth or compassion. Compassion is a mental attitude that is against suffering. To be clear, it's not a belief or theoretical idea. You don't have to be a "me" and they don't have to be a "them" for compassion to arise. ...


1

Not just complete enlightenment. The Buddha taught that even the fruit of stream entry (the first stage of enlightenment, incomplete) exceeds sole dominion over the Earth and lordship over all worlds. From Dhammapada 178: Sole dominion over the earth, going to heaven, lordship over all worlds: the fruit of stream-entry excels them. The commentary for this ...


1

If you knew of a really good restaurant, would you keep that knowledge to yourself, or would you take your friends there? If you saw a fantastic movie, would you go home and muse about it in private, or would you try to get your acquaintances to go see it? There's nothing mystical or magical here. People like to share good things with others; sharing ...


1

"A lay follower should not engage in five types of business. Which five? Business in weapons, business in human beings, business in meat, business in intoxicants, and business in poison." - Vanijja Sutta Is it really very hard to find companies that don't deal with weapons, human trafficking/ slavery/ prostitution, meat, alcoholic beverages, ...


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