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Well... Yes, kind of... The essence of Teaching is the same in all schools and the Ultimate Attainment is one, what varies between the schools is the presentation. However, to tell someone just starting out: "you are already enlightened" would be rather misleading, even if true in a certain sense. The essence of teaching in all schools is removal ...


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According to Theravada teachings assuming that you are enlightened, believing so is discouraged unless you are truly enlightened (at which point it has no value to you anymore). The reason behind avoiding such beliefs is to avoid the practicing Buddhist from becoming stuck in the path to understanding. Simply put, if you believe you have attained Nirvana, yo ...


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Let me first say that the problem doesn't exactly lie in the belief that one is a sage or a buddha. The problem arises when one expects to be treated as a sage or buddha by the rest of the world. I mean, there are two sides to this: The internal state of being awakened (buddha nature) which anyone can realize The social role of being awakened for others (...


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Personally I read "having" enlightenment as a type of identity view, attributing enlightenment to a "self" as if the self is something -- instead I think it might be "less wrong" for me to consider whether enlightened behavior is or isn't (currently) present. I think that's the bulk of the way in which it's taught in the suttas -...


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Regarding common outcome, the Buddha says this: MN121:13.1: Whatever ascetics and brahmins enter and remain in the pure, ultimate, supreme emptiness—whether in the past, future, or present—all of them enter and remain in this same pure, ultimate, supreme emptiness. Regarding progression. the Buddha teaches that the skills developed in the progression are ...


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