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1.One of the ways to deal with anxiety,insecurity or lack of self confidence is by developing Sila (Morality,Integrity,Virtue,Ethics). "Five blessings, householders, accrue to the righteous person through his practice of virtue: great increase of wealth through his diligence; a favorable reputation; a confident deportment, without timidity, in every society,...


11

I suspect the Buddha used the term "rebirth" The entire premise of your question is faulty, unfortunately. The Buddha never, afaik, used a term that could be translated as "rebirth". In fact, the idea of anything being reborn goes against orthodox early Buddhist teachings. Throughout the Buddha's teachings, it is made clear that at the breakup of the body ...


8

I want to know what Siddhartha taught. Well yes, don't we all want to know that. :-) Though it may seem a bitter pill to swallow. :-/ Some Wikipedia articles FYI: Early Buddhism includes a timeline showing the "where and when" of the various schools Pre-sectarian Buddhism is an article about "the Buddhism of the Buddha himself". You might not find it ...


6

Not sure in which sutta, but I remember Buddha having been asked a similar question, about timidity, I think in Anguttara Nikaya. His answer was, basically, that confidence comes from skill. If one is well-learned and well-trained at whatever s/he is doing, one tends to be more confident than an incompetent bumbler. The examples of skills Buddha gave were ...


5

Lucid dream is a place where you can do more work, more Buddhist practice. For example, if you are afraid of fights you can pick a fight with anyone, man or monster. It's a safe place to try things you can't try in regular life. Reference: Tibetan Buddhist teacher Tarab Tulku. For more information read Chapter 19 of The Psychology of Awakening anthology by ...


5

I agree with the commenters above and I want to add that insecurity is a state of mind and thus it has the properties of anicca (impermanence), anatta (insubstantiality) and dukkha (causing suffering). The practice of vipassana trains us to see our states of mind as they arise and cease and not to cling to them. Once we learn to let them go, we realise they ...


5

Summarizing briefly from the introduction to the translation and analysis by A.V. Paribok: The ancient parts are Book 2 and parts of Book 1 -- most likely written in Punjab (North-Western India) about 0 CE. The language of the original was probably Hybrid Sanskrit. Book 1 (the narrative introduction) was evidently expanded and elaborated at a later time, ...


4

Buddhism has the idea of the three jewels: Buddha, Dharma, Sangha. You said "I believe in Buddha and his philosophy" so that's two of them, i.e. Buddha, and Dharma. There are parts e.g. in the Dhammapada which suggest it's better to be alone than with a fool: If for company you cannot find a wise and prudent friend who leads a good life, then, like a ...


4

From Neyyattha Sutta (A 2.3): Bhikshus, there are these two who misrepresent the Tathagata. What are the two? Those who explain a sutta whose sense is direct as indirect. Those who explain a sutta whose sense is indirect as direct. These, bhikshus, are the two who misrepresent the Tathagata. Examples of provisional teachings from Dharmafarer's analysis ...


4

The spirit of the Buddha's Teaching has always been: "To come, practice, and experience it for yourself". He had long abandoned the ego to prove anything to anyone: "Gotami, the qualities of which you may know, 'These qualities lead to passion, not to dispassion; to being fettered, not to being unfettered; to accumulating, not to shedding; to self-...


4

How is Cakkhupālattheravatthu pronounced exactly? In the video "Dhammapada Verse One: Mind Precedes All Things", by Ven. Yuttadhammo, the pronunciation can be heard at 5:21 min. into the video.


3

There are two Pali words that seem relevant to this question: Kalika meaning "related to time" Akalika meaning "not related to time" There's a definition of the words here in this 'glossology': Akalika -- Timelessness, A synonym for Arahantship, An attribute of the Dhamma It suggests two meanings for kalika: Two events can be said to kalika when they are ...


3

As Buddha himself said many times, his teaching culminates in Liberation By Wisdom. What does this mean? Our conceptual mind can hardly go beyond the boxes of the concepts it learns. Whatever concepts the mind has, that's how it sees the world, that's the reality for the mind. Usually, our concepts are very coarse, primitive, approximate, simplistic, and ...


3

There is no external evidence for the Buddhist texts before Asoka. The evidence for Asoka's time is extremely limited - a few texts mentioned by name with no content. All dates in early Indian history are highly conjectural. There is for example no other evidence than Buddhist texts for if or when the Buddha lived, and that evidence has produced a number of ...


3

According to Theravada tradiation: 563 BCE - (Buddha) was born. 528 - Enlighten. 483 - Parinirvana. 483 - First council ,(After 3 month of parinirvana.) collected Dhamma as (Deega, Maggima, Sanuktha, Anguthara) Nikayas or Agamas and Vinaya. Assign Bikkus('Banaka') for memorize and recite. 386 - Second council - separated Mahāsāṃghika and Sthaviras(...


3

Clinging to rites and rituals It is mis-belief in something miracle and shortcut. It is mis-belief in worshipping the creator or god can bring the worshipper's liberation/salvation. It is something one is throwing away own efforts and nurturing own knowledge and wisdom. It is just mis-belief in some powerful beings (god) or some powerful things (fire [in ...


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See: The Jataka by Robert Chalmers ed. E.B. Cowell in www.sacred-texts.com. The index is found here.


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Were there 27 more Buddhas before Siddhartha Gautam Buddha? Yes, the Buddha speaks of them in his suttas, many of them from different times/planets throughout the universe(s). If so, are there any evidences of it. Other than the suttas themselves, yes in various other religious traditions. How about the finding of Buddhist Stupas and Idols in Harappa ...


3

Because nibbāna of Upanishad and Vedas is sassata-diṭṭhi (eternalism) in brahmmajālasutta. But nibbāna of buddhism is enlightened by ariya at the finish line (enlightenment) of the middle way, that is in the midst of whole extreme teaching around the universe, such as eternalism, annihilationism, egoism, altruism, theistic determinism, determinism that ...


3

The difference is significant. To say: "This is not the self", is to point to some existing thing and having examined it with the criteria for what is worthy to consider the self (that is, that it is something that is under one's control) and finding it out of one's control, the statement is simply the expression of an observable, provable fact. To say: "...


3

There are two levels of Teaching, for the common people, and for professional seekers of Nirvana. To first, Buddha taught no-nonsense ethics, chastity etc. Sex for procreation, faithful marriage, these kinds of things. Going mostly by his basic principle of "what leads to peace and harmony is good, what creates causes for potential conflict is bad" - ...


2

In Mind-Only school of Buddhism, there is something called the 8 consciousnesses. The 8th consciousnes, aka the alaya storehouse consciousness, similar to an "Akashic record." It is an easily misunderstood concept according to the Surangama Sutra and the late Zen Master Huai-Chin Nan's lectures because apparently one can easily become confused about it. ...


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Shinshu Buddhism also refers to this http://amida-ji-retreat-temple-romania.blogspot.com/2011/12/alaya-storehouse-consciousness-and.html The alaya consciousness or storehouse consciousness is the place where all the actions and experiences in this life and the previous lives generated by the seven consciousnesses are stored as karma, being the only ...


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An idea of the core teachings of Buddha can be derived from the Maha Parinibbana Sutta...the teachings before his final nibbana. In the sutta, the Blessed One says, "Now, O bhikkhus, I say to you that these teachings of which I have direct knowledge and which I have made known to you — these you should thoroughly learn, cultivate, develop, and frequently ...


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To do good deeds, avoid bad deeds and purify the mind. And the practice to attain that is through Sila (morality), Samadhi (Meditation) and Panna (Wisdom).


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Here is the Tipitaka or Pali Canon in English: http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/ From Wikipedia: The Pāli Canon (Pali: Tipitaka) is the standard collection of scriptures in the Theravadan Buddhist tradition, as preserved in the Pāli language.[1] It is the first known and most complete extant early Buddhist canon.[2][3] There are also scripture ...


2

As a zen buddhist in Florida of the United States, taking refuge in the three jewels is the ceremony in which one will often consider themselves becoming buddhist. Taking on the precepts can be seen as the threshold one makes to become a Buddhist. Afterwards one often gets a "Dharma name" and formally calls themselves a Buddhist Practitioner. Of course this ...


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There are 4 Bhikkhu - Male monk Bhikkhuni - Female nun Upasaka - Lay male follower Upasika - Lay female follower Also note that in the Suttas all of the above are referred as Bhikkhus in addressing.


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Some great answers here. I think that the core of Buddhism is expressed wonderfully by the doctrine of the three poisons and their corresponding antidotes. As has been mentioned though, you're going to want to read the 4NT sutra. The foundation of buddhist thought series volume 1 covers what you want in a very accessible way.


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I doubt you'll find a good answer as to whether Buddhism is a religion or a way of life, simply because there's a ton of stuff that's called Buddhism and not everyone agrees as to what constitutes a religion anyway. Many Buddhists consider taking the vows to be the thing that makes you a Buddhist, so if you want to make it "official", you can take the vows ...


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