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Lamrim is a genre. It is a genre of spiritual literature that gives a thorough overview of the whole teaching, methodically progressing from somewhat crude and primitive concepts of basic levels, to more sophisticated and nuanced perspectives of the higher levels. Each school usually has their favorite lamrim text or two (one for beginning students, one for ...


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While I'm clearly out of my depth with this question, let me give you a few pointers. (TL;DR version: Thogal is cultivation of "suchness", aka tathata). First, you need to understand what Dzogchen, or Great Perfection, really refers to. Basically, this is the direct realization of the Heart Sutra experience. In other words, you need to clearly see that ...


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Dzogchen is the understanding that enlightenment can't be found outside a person Not the best definition - most other schools would agree with this - doesn't make them Dzogchen. Dzogchen (Dzog-pa Chen-po) means Ultimate Completeness or Great Perfection. Dzogchen is the understanding that everything is already perfect, everything is the way it is for ...


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Lam Rim in Tibetan literally means stages of the path. It's a kind of literature that gives a general overview of the path to enlightenment in terms of the three capacities of individuals and the different practices one must engage in. The first Lam Rim text was Atisha's work called the Lamp for the Path to Enlightenment, and over time other Lam Rim works ...


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In terms of practice, the key point I've learned is that thögal can only be practiced from the perspective of rigpa (pristine awareness); which in turn assumes that one has achieved shamatha, perfected vipashyana, and completed trekchö. Even kind, authentic teachers that openly and lucidly teach Dzogchen do not generally teach thögal, simply because there is ...


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(Bear in mind that I have no knowledge of Dzogchen, this is only what I found through search engines.) What is Thögal? Tögal (Tib. ཐོད་རྒལ་, Wyl. thod rgal) — one of the two aspects, along with trekchö, of Dzogchen practice. Tögal, translated as ‘direct crossing’, ‘the direct approach’ or ‘leapover’, can bring very quickly the actual realization ...


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Dzogchen teaches a non-dualistic state of one's own primordial nature, with nothing to reject or accept, that is pure from the beginning in the nature of a light body. -- Khenpo Palden In simple words: Original Buddhism introduced many new concepts to describe 1) the unenlightened state of mind, and 2) practice leading to Liberation. Theravada's approach ...


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Rigpa is what in Zen is called "your true self" or "true nature". In practice of a Zen student, Rigpa manifests as clarity. It's like, when you have spent enough time in the wilderness and got your mind cleared, or you have meditated enough -- and now you have this lucidity. You understand everything that you encounter without much thinking. Things are ...


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Sweeping is a process made up of many experiences. An experience is made up of the five aggregates. Each of the five aggregates is Anicca, Dukkha, Anatta in nature. That makes each experience Anicca, Dukkha, Anatta. It's not about waiting for something to finish and calling it impermanent. That's obvious even without meditation. That is not strong enough to ...


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