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Carlo certainly discovered the first Noble Truth of suffering, but there are three others: SN56.32:4.5: ‘After truly comprehending the noble truths of suffering, its origin, its cessation, and the path, I will completely make an end of suffering.’ Indeed he understood the fickleness of craving and its role in suffering, which is the second Noble Truth, ...


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I believe this is one of those questions which we need to make less complicated, rather than more. In my opinion 'dukkha' doesn't take some kind of profound realization. That life is difficult is something that most people intuitively understand, whether or not they've studied Buddhism. The question from that point - life is hard - forward, is how you deal ...


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You wanna read “Myth of Sysphus” by Camus who basically says, if life is meaningless and dukkha, so does suicide.” Did anyone tell you that it gets better after that?


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As i see it, one can't rightfully declare suicide to be a solution to the drudgery of mundane life lest one knows exactly what life is. Saying things like 'life is unjust' ie is quite rediculous because it begets the question what exactly is unjust about it, is the spin of an electron unjust? Is the speed of causality ulucky? Hence when one thinks about ...


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How not to end up like Carlo, or completely depressed at the very least? Keep on questioning, keep on looking for truth. If everything is dukkha, which it is, don't run away - keep getting closer until it's right here. Keep getting closer so you can see dukkha for what it is. Dukkha has to be fully understood, first-hand, directly in front of your own ...


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The word 'dukkha' has three different meanings: 'Pain', in relation to painful feelings. 'Unsatisfactoriness', in relation to impermanent things unable to bring lasting happiness. 'Suffering', in relation to how attachment is mental torment. Enlightened beings experience painful feelings & the unsatisfactoriness of impermanent things but ...


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