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Very good question, focused on real and useful problem. Mind generates aversion when things go contrary to what it believes is "right". This belief is called "attachment". For example you believe that only certain weather is good and that it should be that same weather most of the time. So the first technique is to remember this as soon ...


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Case 57 of the Blue Rock Collection I alone am holy Case A monastic said to Zhaozhou, "It is said, 'The Great Way is not difficult. It only abhors choice and attachment.' Now, what are nonchoice and nonattachment?" Zhaozhou said, "I alone am holy throughout heaven and earth." The monastic said, "It is still choice and attachment.&...


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The teachings of the Buddha are not metaphysics. They do not describe the ontology or nature of things. The teachings of the Buddha serve one purpose only - freedom from suffering. It's purpose is soteriological, not ontological. In "Anicca Vata Sankhara", Ven. Bodhi comments: The most important fact to understand about sankharas, as conditioned ...


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As i understand it Dukkha can be derived from the Sanskrit kha, one meaning of which is some sort of opening, ie 'the axle-hole of a wheel', and the antithetic prefix Duk. Meaning that if you were given a wheel to try for a fit and having tried putting it on your chariot axle you would see that the wheel's 'kha' is a bad fit. Someone would then ask you if ...


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I think the closest fit to dukkha in English is the word 'discontent'. The essential idea behind dukkha is a mismatch between what is and what ought to be. To use the classic examples, we think we should have been born into a better condition; we think we should always be healthy; we think we should always be young and vital; we think we should live forever.....


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I'm not sure who wrote the short introduction at the top of the Dukkha page of AccessToInsight.org but it is a very appropriate comment to your question: No single English word adequately captures the full depth, range, and subtlety of the crucial Pali term dukkha. Over the years, many translations of the word have been used ("stress," "...


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It is the usual dialogues between the buddha and the monks “Monks, is bodily form permanent or impermanent?” The monks said to the Buddha: “It is impermanent, Blessed One.” The Buddha said: “Monks, what is impermanent, is it dukkha?” The monks said to the Buddha: “It is dukkha, Blessed One.” The Buddha said: “Monks, what is impermanent, dukkha, of a nature ...


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All feelings, perceptions & existence are dukkha because they are an expression of the conditioned element. There are two elements to be known; conditioned and the unconditioned. Not knowing the unconditioned which comes to be known through it's realization as the 'nibbananirodhadhatu' [extinguishment-cessation-principle] of the conditioned [dukkha]. The ...


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First, I'd be a bit careful about ascribing a causal relationship between dukkha and tanhā ('discontentment' and 'craving'). If I remember correctly there is a long-running debate among scholars about which causes the other, and in any case it strikes me the two represent different dimensions of analysis: a passive state and an active attitude. "I am ...


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I’d start with what the Buddha said was the goal of life: it is, simply, “dwelling, here and now, beyond appetites, consummate, unfevered, in bliss, in (wholesomeness).” (Further Dialogues of the Buddha, Vol. I, p. 247, Tr. Lord Chalmers, Oxford University, London 1926) So that: “... to whatever place you go, you shall go in comfort; wherever you stand, you ...


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Good householder, Without life, a good birth, how could, would one practice the path out. As the lokuttara-depending co-arising counts: birth/stand/life(jati) is condition for Dukkha, Dukkha reason for Saddha (conviction),... liberation. So "gati, gati, paragati, parasamgati Bodhisvaha", good housholder. Getting better, better, over-good becoming, ...


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Anatta is a difficult and often misunderstood concept. When Buddhists talk about no-self, they mean it in the context of self-conceptualization: a mental object that is identified as the 'self'. In other words, we construct a mental object that we identify as ourself, and fall into the trap of thinking that mental construct is the reality, not a creation. '...


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The Buddha taught 3 types of dukkha: Dukkha-dukkhata, the actual feeling of physical or mental unpleasantness. Sankhara-dukkhata, the inherent unpleasantness of the formations. Viparinama-dukkhata, the inherent unpleasantness of change. https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/sn/sn45/sn45.165.wlsh.html Dukkha is principally defined as the aggregates: ...


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If you have come to Buddhism out of a desire to no longer suffer, that desire itself may lead to more suffering for you, if you do not succeed, for whatever reason. Buddhism provides ways to end your own suffering, but not by developing an aversion to life, but rather, by training your mind so that you do not crave things you do not have, nor desire things ...


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All compounded and/ or conditioned things are impermanent or changing. This applies to the five aggregates, physical objects, matter, energy, physical space, time, most mental concepts and ideas etc. All matter can be broken down to energy. Energy can be converted to matter. That we know from Einstein's E=mc2. Matter can convert into different forms and so ...


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Craving for existence and craving for non existence , both are undesirable. We should see birth, life and death as dependently originated. Dependent Origination is the Dhamma. Dependent on birth comes life. Dependent on attachment comes birth. Dependent on craving comes the attachment. Craving of any kind leads to rebirth. For example craving for food or no ...


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OP: My question is how do I think or train mind to not have either desire or aversion towards life? There are plenty of reasons to not be afflicted by craving, and at the same time maintain happiness in your life. Here are a few reasons from the Dhammapada: Happy indeed we live, friendly amidst the hostile. Amidst hostile men we dwell free from hatred. ...


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Now this has led me to other end of thought spectrum of aversion towards life. As I learnt and understood 'craving for non existance' is also a craving and should be avoided. But how can one think otherwise. This is a very common misconception that I see very frequently. Yes it is true that ‘craving for non-existence’ is a form of craving that we wish to be ...


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"Dukkha" is used for both "pain" and "suffering". The feeling of pain is called "dukkha vedana". The experience of suffering is called "dukkha of attachment" ("upadana dukkha").


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"Agha" is pretty close to what you're looking for.


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Wikipedia defines antinatalism as follows: Antinatalism, or anti-natalism, is a philosophical position and social movement that assigns a negative value to birth. Antinatalists argue that humans should abstain from procreation because it is morally bad (some also recognize the procreation of other sentient beings as morally bad). In respect to Noble People,...


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"Come, bite your botty" sometimes help quick if telling angy children, or to "force" them looking, or need to look, into a mirror. Try it, when ever aversion arises.


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The rain is cold. With too much rain we can die of exposure. Knowing a body is cold, we can shield it or take it to a dry place. The thought "I am cold" or "I am averse to cold" can be replaced with the simple thought, "there is wet. there is cold." Further thoughts can address the situation with "this is bearable" or &...


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You reflect aversion is harmful to yourself & others; it causes stress to yourself & can even lead to physical disease, such as cancer. If you get angry at the other person in the wrong way or place, you can lose your job, etc, or get suspended by politically correct authorities. You also reflect the Buddha taught the foundational element of the ...


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Not sure whether it is a Buddhist perspective, i would like to share few things which may be of some sense to you. Please excuse my immature writing skills. There are two streams of thoughts/ideas/concepts/feelings we are put up with in any life situation. In present case, first stream is the feeling/idea of aversion. Please don't assume i am denouncing that ...


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My question is how do I think or train mind to not have either desire or aversion towards life? The danger of craving for non-existence is that it is a fatal obsession. Some with this wrong view have committed suicide. SN54.9:4.2: “Ānanda, why does the mendicant Saṅgha seem so diminished?” Because of this danger, the Buddha taught mindfulness of breathing ...


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'craving for non existance' That is a craving based on a notion of an existent being that ceases to exist. The verbalization of this craving is; 'I am', there being 'I am' there comes to be 'I exist', there being 'I exist' there comes to be 'I am bad because i exist', there being 'I am bad because i exist' there comes to be 'May I not be bad', there being '...


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It might be worth mentioning that in English they're called "the three marks of existence" -- but in Pali the word tilakkhaṇa literally means the "three marks" or "three characteristics" (not "of existence"), or signata -- and the "things" which have (or which are ascribed) the dukkha characteristic are ...


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'Dukkha' = du + kha = 'hard/difficult to endure' or 'unbearable' In its most basic ordinary unenlightened sense, 'dukkha' refers to physical pain and painful feelings, such as grief & sorrow, which in the Pali is called 'dukkha vedana' or 'painful feelings'. For most people, such feelings are 'difficult to endure' or 'unbearable'. In its enlightened ...


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Yes. Haven't you seen animals suffering from pain, hunger, fear, anger, anxiety, jealousy and other negative states of mind, which are based on the three poisons of greed/ lust, aversion and delusion? All sentient beings with five aggregates (form, feeling, perception, mental formations and consciousness), who are unenlightened, are subject to suffering. All ...


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