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8

Yuttadhammo wrote, I don't know of any example where the Buddha actually said "life is suffering". and, The first noble truth is simply "This is the truth of suffering." Nowhere in the enumeration of what is suffering does it refer to life. "Life is suffering" isn't listed in fakebuddhaquotes; but it is the first item in a list of "Misunderstanding ...


8

The first noble truth is actually amazingly relatable for the most part, as in no reasonable person could find fault with it. Since it doesn't appear to have been mentioned, I will post a full literal translation of the first noble truth from the Dhamma­cakkap­pa­vat­ta­na­sutta: jātipi dukkhā Birth is dukkha jarāpi dukkhā Old age is dukkha ...


7

Bipolar and depression are both very serious mental illnesses and should be treated accordingly. Too often dharma teachers who are unprepared try to resolve what are true clinical issues. As I was once told "sometimes meditation is the answer sometimes medication is the answer." That of course does not mean that practice can not help with these problems but ...


6

In all examples both acted suboptimally. It looks like person B should learn to understand and appreciate other people's perspectives. Perhaps he should say: "I understand why you worry about the lawn. It does look very high by normal standards. The normal standards are X inches and the lawn is Y. But I am not declining to mow it out of laziness, believe me....


6

Samsara is a continuum of our individual mind moments. Dukkha is the deep down feeling that something is missing or wrong that occurs throughout Samsara.


6

The gateway premise is not that "existence is suffering", it is that "something is wrong here". In other words, if you are perfectly satisfied with everything (are you?), if you are clear about the purpose of life, if you are a master in dealing with all possible kinds of situations -- then there is no reason for you to look out for anything at all, be it ...


6

In the first noble truth, the five clinging aggregates are defined as dukkha. Since all experiences are reduced to the five aggregates, I think the experience of all things (and not the things experienced themselves) is dukkha. At least this is how I have understood the First Noble Truth. I don't have much knowledge about the translation/etymology of the ...


6

Unfortunately (because it doesn't answer your question), I'd guess it's better to find "practical solutions to everyday suffering" that don't contradict Buddhism. When my father died, there's a couple of things people did for my mum which she appreciated (i.e. these are stories which she retold, of examples of how to help people who are grieving because she ...


6

Thich Nhat Hanh made an error because he was attempting to rationalize another error. If Thich Nhat Hanh actually understood the teachings, he would not state the teaching of 'samskara dukkhata' is false but instead, simply rectify the error in the interpretation of the teaching. The spirit of what Thich Nhat Hanh said is correct, namely, there is no ...


6

Your question seems very sensible. Some thoughts... I think you're wrong to suggest that the Buddha was 'not sure what will happen...'. There are some things that may be known but not explained. He advises us not to worry about metaphysical problems and just take the medicine, but this does not mean these problems are not understood or the facts not known. ...


5

Here is the simple answer to what you feel... We are in constant pain and suffering. As to lord Buddha Eyes,Ears,Tongue,Nose,Body & Mind are Burning from three things (Lust,Anger,Confusion -[Raga,Dwesha,Moha]). But the one who practice and realize escape the burning forever,he is free. So here's what is happening to you... Now that you have ...


5

My interpretation would be that all things are not suffering, for several reasons. First of all, the first Noble Truth needs to be seen in context with the other Noble Truths - it says in life there is suffering, but also that there are causes and a path to the cessation of suffering. Most composite entities are not alive and so cannot follow the path. It ...


5

Right view is the leader ('forerunner') of the path. When you realize idle chatter leads to more dukkha, this is right view leading your speech. When the mind maintains right speech in communication, this is right mindfulness. In actually practising the path, right view & right mindfulness work together, as described below: Of those, right view ...


5

Anicca is not an+icca, rather it is a+nicca. The Sanskrit equivalent is anitya, which is a+nitya. Nicca according to wisdomlib means: nicca : (adj.) constant; continuous; permanent. (Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise Pali-English Dictionary Anicca according to wisdomlib means: anicca : (adj.) not stable; impermanent. (Source): BuddhaSasana: Concise ...


4

I believe that your assertion that, if you look in the Pali Cannon that you do not find the phrase, "life is suffering," is absolutely correct. I am not a renown scholar or monk, but in my own studies and readings, I have also never once come across that phrase, so if it is merely a personal failure to discover it, it is both of ours, at the least! To my ...


4

As I said here, each of the Three Marks (Transience, Dukkha, Corelessness) produces a surprising effect when it is fully accepted: Fully accepting Transience brings a surprising sense of timeless peace and even a sense of stability as you get fully established in the momentary "eternal now". Fully accepting Dukkha brings a surprising sense of contentment ...


4

If I can try to generalize, I would venture to guess that people who come to Buddhism on their own (as opposed to being born into the religion) -- are probably less happy than average, which is what pushes them to seek the way out to begin with. The reference to suffering in the First Noble Truth is not meant as the final conclusion the Buddhists are ...


4

From parinibbana suttha 16: The Gracious One’s Sickness Then the Gracious One, after living near Ambapālī’s Wood for as long as he liked, addressed venerable Ānanda, saying: “Come Ānanda let us approach the little village of Beluva.” “Very well, reverend Sir,” venerable Ānanda replied to the Gracious One. Then the Gracious One ...


4

Is smoking tobacco acceptable in any school of Buddhism? I read that smoking is done. The Broken Buddha includes these (and other) references to smoking. No Sri Lankan monk would dare to smoke in public because this is believed to infringe the Vinaya but it is quite acceptable for them to chew tobacco. Thailand’s Thammayut sect likewise considers ...


4

The definition of the 3 feelings come in MN 44 and their relationships to the 3 underlying tendencies towards greed, repulsion and ignorance: “Pleasant feeling is pleasant when it remains and painful when it perishes. “Sukhā kho, āvuso visākha, vedanā ṭhitisukhā vipariṇāmadukkhā; Painful feeling is painful when it remains and pleasant when it ...


4

Most of your question revolves around your (expected) lack of knowledge about how Buddhism defines suffering, how it defines happiness, and how it explains one or the other occurs. That's why, when you talk about suffering, happiness, and what happens to arahant after death, you should understand the context within which these are seen in Buddhism. Few ...


4

In the Pali suttas, the word "dukkha" is used in three different ways: (i) Unpleasant/painful feelings, which are not "suffering". Refer to SN 36.6, MN 37, MN 38, MN 148 and countless other suttas that explain "feelings" ("vedana") in themselves are not suffering. (ii) The inability of impermanent things to bring true & lasting happiness (refer to SN ...


4

OP: What is the difference between domanassa & dukkha? There are many classifications of feelings: Vedanā (Feeling) According to the 5-fold classification, a distinction is made between mental and physical pain and pleasure. Vedanā (Feeling) In this classification, physical pain (Kāyika dukkha) is called simply dukkha and mental pain (cetasika ...


3

When you are hungry and you take a first bite of your favorite meal, the happiness in the aspect of a pleasant feeling that you experience is not actual happiness, it is not in the nature of happiness: it is contaminated happiness. That pleasant feeling you experience is merely a relief. You experience the first bite as [contaminated] happiness only because ...


3

In my own words: Samsara is the same world you see on TV and read about in newspapers. This world is a hallucination (a subjective reality) fabricated in dependence on the fundamental confusion caused by the fundamental ignorance. This confusion causes dukkha and dukkha causes further confusion, which is why Samsara is dubbed "cyclic existence" - but also ...


3

You got "existence is suffering" right. Some people think "life is suffering", which is the wrong interpretation. Life as you say, is a roller coaster of many emotions and experiences. In one's neverending existence, one is subject to birth, death, rebirth, experiencing endless ups and downs of pleasure and pain, joy and sorrow, gaining and losing loved ...


3

Speaking from the position of the third (insight) training in Theravada: it is not necessary to believe that existence is suffering; it is important to train insight and see for yourself how things are. Dukkha (which is perhaps better translated as unsatisfactoriness) is one of the three characteristics of everything (= all mind states -- except of the ...


3

An aspiring bodhisattva would use Upaya and do anything to ease the suffering of another without breaking the five precepts. Only when another person's mind/hearth is calmed and malleable would it then be able to receive/absorb dharma. Even then he can only act within the limits of his own wisdom, so his intention, skilful or unskilful, is very important. ...


3

While you may not be able to emulate Buddha's psychic powers, the Buddha recommends in the Sigalovada Sutta on how good friends are. The role of mentor and compassionate friend applies to your case. "Young man, be aware of these four good-hearted friends: the helper, the friend who endures in good times and bad, the mentor, and the compassionate ...


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