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15 votes

Buddhism broke up my marriage

I don't suppose that any of us are qualified to advise you on your marriage or the optimal duration of it. In theory, I really don't think it's fair to say that Buddhist love is non-romantic. The ...
12 votes

Did the Buddha really say that "life is suffering"?

The first noble truth is actually amazingly relatable for the most part, as in no reasonable person could find fault with it. Since it doesn't appear to have been mentioned, I will post a full literal ...
8 votes

Did the Buddha really say that "life is suffering"?

Yuttadhammo wrote, I don't know of any example where the Buddha actually said "life is suffering". and, The first noble truth is simply "This is the truth of suffering." Nowhere ...
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7 votes
Accepted

How do Buddhists handle mental illness such as depression or bipolar disorder?

Bipolar and depression are both very serious mental illnesses and should be treated accordingly. Too often dharma teachers who are unprepared try to resolve what are true clinical issues. As I was ...
  • 1,224
7 votes

Buddhism broke up my marriage

She is your Buddha, your dharma, and your sangha. Love the world through your love for her. Your marriage is your refuge and your bodhimandala. It is the place where you will awaken - no less ...
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6 votes
Accepted

Doing versus not doing what others tell you to do

In all examples both acted suboptimally. It looks like person B should learn to understand and appreciate other people's perspectives. Perhaps he should say: "I understand why you worry about the ...
  • 55.8k
6 votes
Accepted

Difference between Samsara and Dukkha

Samsara is a continuum of our individual mind moments. Dukkha is the deep down feeling that something is missing or wrong that occurs throughout Samsara.
  • 6,754
6 votes

Is it necessary for a Buddhist to believe that existence is suffering?

The gateway premise is not that "existence is suffering", it is that "something is wrong here". In other words, if you are perfectly satisfied with everything (are you?), if you are clear about the ...
  • 55.8k
6 votes

Did the Buddha really say that "life is suffering"?

In the first noble truth, the five clinging aggregates are defined as dukkha. Since all experiences are reduced to the five aggregates, I think the experience of all things (and not the things ...
  • 201
6 votes

Are practical solutions to everyday suffering that contradict Buddhism Upaya or avidya?

Unfortunately (because it doesn't answer your question), I'd guess it's better to find "practical solutions to everyday suffering" that don't contradict Buddhism. When my father died, there'...
  • 43.6k
6 votes

Buddhism broke up my marriage

Buddhism does not contradict romantic love; Buddhism contradicts romantic obsession. Granting that this is a terribly difficult discrimination for most people to make — confusing love with obsession ...
  • 4,480
5 votes

Am I "fooling" myself?

Here is the simple answer to what you feel... We are in constant pain and suffering. As to lord Buddha Eyes,Ears,Tongue,Nose,Body & Mind are Burning from three things (Lust,Anger,Confusion -[...
  • 3,933
5 votes

Zen & Dukkha -- Is Everything Suffering?

My interpretation would be that all things are not suffering, for several reasons. First of all, the first Noble Truth needs to be seen in context with the other Noble Truths - it says in life there ...
  • 91
5 votes

Is smoking tobacco acceptable in any school of Buddhism?

Is smoking tobacco acceptable in any school of Buddhism? I read that smoking is done. The Broken Buddha includes these (and other) references to smoking. No Sri Lankan monk would dare to smoke ...
  • 43.6k
5 votes

Domanassa & Dukkha in enlightened beings?

OP: What is the difference between domanassa & dukkha? There are many classifications of feelings: Vedanā (Feeling) According to the 5-fold classification, a distinction is made between mental ...
5 votes

Why is 'dukkha' included in one of the three marks of existence?

The teachings of the Buddha are not metaphysics. They do not describe the ontology or nature of things. The teachings of the Buddha serve one purpose only - freedom from suffering. It's purpose is ...
  • 34.2k
5 votes

How to practise without having aversion towards life?

Case 57 of the Blue Rock Collection I alone am holy Case A monastic said to Zhaozhou, "It is said, 'The Great Way is not difficult. It only abhors choice and attachment.' Now, what are nonchoice ...
  • 374
5 votes

How to stop rejecting / avoiding things?

Very good question, focused on real and useful problem. Mind generates aversion when things go contrary to what it believes is "right". This belief is called "attachment". For ...
  • 55.8k
5 votes

3 marks of existence: conditioned vs unconditioned things?

Imagine you were looking for Nirvana, Enlightenment, Liberation - whatever you want to call it. As a rational man you are, you would think logically: Regardless of what Nirvana actually is (whatever ...
  • 55.8k
4 votes

Did the Buddha really say that "life is suffering"?

I believe that your assertion that, if you look in the Pali Cannon that you do not find the phrase, "life is suffering," is absolutely correct. I am not a renown scholar or monk, but in my own studies ...
  • 388
4 votes
Accepted

Are Buddhists happier people?

If I can try to generalize, I would venture to guess that people who come to Buddhism on their own (as opposed to being born into the religion) -- are probably less happy than average, which is what ...
  • 55.8k
4 votes
Accepted

Am I "fooling" myself?

As I said here, each of the Three Marks (Transience, Dukkha, Corelessness) produces a surprising effect when it is fully accepted: Fully accepting Transience brings a surprising sense of timeless ...
  • 55.8k
4 votes
Accepted

What enters the mind of an idle Buddha?

From parinibbana suttha 16: The Gracious One’s Sickness Then the Gracious One, after living near Ambapālī’s Wood for as long as he liked, addressed venerable Ānanda, saying: “Come ...
  • 1,601
4 votes
Accepted

Is there a kind of consulting service in Buddhism?

First a bit of background or context -- just in case you didn't know. So apparently, as well as the suttas, there's something called the vinaya i.e. the code of Monastic discipline. These are (or ...
  • 43.6k
4 votes
Accepted

What's the relation between feelings of neither-pleasure-nor-pain and ignorance?

The definition of the 3 feelings come in MN 44 and their relationships to the 3 underlying tendencies towards greed, repulsion and ignorance: “Pleasant feeling is pleasant when it remains and ...
  • 34.2k

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