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13

I too had this question for a long time. Then I read Gil Fronsdal's translation of the Dhammapada, which begins (emphasis mine): All experience is preceded by mind, Led by mind, Made by mind. This use of the word experience, where phenomena is often used, is much more accessible. Remember, the Buddha did not say "all phenomena is made by mind"; he ...


9

Citta, Cetasika, Rupa, Nibbana are the four ultimate realities. Everything else is just conventional or conceptual truths. When you see the moon, it's basically the eyes sensing the secondary rupa called Vanna. There's no moon in the ultimate reality. Moon is just what the mind fabricates when rupa meets the eyes. There's consistency because human senses ...


6

The dreams Bodhisatta had about his future Buddhahoood are given in the Supina Sutta. "When the Tathagata — worthy & rightly self-awakened — was still just an unawakened bodhisatta, five great dreams appeared to him. Which five? "When the Tathagata — worthy & rightly self-awakened — was still just an unawakened bodhisatta, this great ...


5

Lucid dream is a place where you can do more work, more Buddhist practice. For example, if you are afraid of fights you can pick a fight with anyone, man or monster. It's a safe place to try things you can't try in regular life. Reference: Tibetan Buddhist teacher Tarab Tulku. For more information read Chapter 19 of The Psychology of Awakening anthology by ...


5

This is actually nothing special to feel excited about. In Ayurvedic terms, when Vatha(air element) is imbalanced in the body, people tend to see dreams of flying. More information here On the other hand, the ability to fly through the air is just one of the many psychic feats an advanced meditator can perform. It has nothing to do with dreaming. It ...


5

Basically, the Buddhist approach to understanding reality is for each one of us to aim our attention at our individual present moment experience. This is "experiencial reality", meaning we need to experience it to understand it. We really don't need to even read books to understand the Buddhist approach because practicing experiencing present moment ...


4

Venerable K. Sri Dhammananda Maha Thera: According to Buddhist psychology dreams are ideational processes which occur as activities of the mind. And: Dreams are mind-created phenomena and they are activities of the mind. All human beings dream, although some people cannot remember. Buddhism teaches that some dreams have psychological significance. ...


3

I’d just like to add some general comments to your - excellent - question. First of all, your question is not specifically Buddhist. If you take a look at the history of philosophy of science, this is a major problem and has been answered in many different ways. And the greatest philosophers of all times all more or less agree that we cannot have absolute ...


3

what is the Buddhist explanation? You're reading the Laṅkāvatāra Sūtra. I'd like to mention just in case you don't know already that there are different schools of Buddhism, spread over centuries and continents. They have much in common and later schools evolve from earlier schools. To the extent that they're similar, it makes sense to ask about "the&...


3

Any phenomena we know about the world is what we have sensed through our sense faculties. If we cannot sense any phenomena there will be no way we can know about it. The definition of mind is the process to experience and object or phenomena, or to know what is felt through contact. So when you experience something many of what you see is pieced together ...


3

Before I became Buddhist I did a lot of random "spiritual" practices, including "astral travel". The later is when you try to retain "waking" consciousness as you fall asleep. I only had mixed success with the various techniques for achieving that, but the one that worked more or less well was to relax the body and completely refrain from any movement until ...


3

Here is an analysis of the Buddhist approach to dreams. Just quoting the conclusion. C) Conclusion Following a Buddhist example, how are we supposed to deal with dreams? Do we dismiss them as empty and false, do we diagnose our health from dream symptoms, do we systematically analyze their symbols as an index of our religious practice? Dreams ...


3

I met many interesting people in dreams or in visions awake: Jesus, my old Zen teacher, some other Buddhist and Hindu teachers and so on. Some of them have told me very powerful mantras, some have encouraged me in practice or pointed at my mistakes. And of course I practised with them in my dreams, with joy and benefit. In none of those dreams or visions ...


3

Monks are not supposed to interpret dreams Whereas some recluses and brahmins, living off food given in faith, maintain themselves by wrong livelihood through the low arts such as: ... interpreting dreams Te,vijja Sutta Mahāsupina Jātaka does mention the Buddha interpreting 16 dreams King Pasenadi Kosala. But with regarding dreams, ...


3

Dreams are not mentioned a lot int he suttas. Perhaps you can search the vinaya instead of the suttas. THe best there is for the suttas is ''the lack of evil dreams'', from metta "Monks, eleven advantages are to be expected from the release (deliverance) of heart by familiarizing oneself with thoughts of loving-kindness[1], by the cultivation of ...


2

This sounds like sleep paralysis, which often involves the following: An inability to move Vibrations Imagery A sense of a (often malevolent) presence near you This is a common state that has nothing to do with Buddhism. In fact, some hypothesize that stories of alien abductions or succubi are distorted reports of experiences in that state. Perhaps ...


2

Good question. Most Buddhist teachers do advise us to try to ignore dreams and visions. Hard to do, sometimes. Still, in some places, they do place credence on dreams. During the Kalachakra Initiation, a 2 or 3-day affair, after the first day's teachings, the student is advised to try to remember his dream from that night. [http://www.berzinarchives.com/web/...


2

When you are in deep sleep your Bhavanga consciousness is active and at this stage you are not mindful. If you are in a dream state there is some metal activity hence there can be some mindfulness and concentration, but this goes in hand with Sloth and Torpor hence the level of mindfulness and concentration would be weak.


2

Tibetan Dream Yoga is the original form of lucid dreaming documented for at least 1,000 years. Just like our Westernized understanding of lucid dreams, the initial aim is to awaken the consciousness in the dream state. The Basis of Dream Yoga Their aim is to harness the power of the lucid dream state by "apprehending the dream". Students are then ...


2

When you sleep, your mind is in somewhat of an uncontrolled state. I understand this to be the reason why monks sleep so few hours. The importance of lucid dreaming to your practice will likely depend on what tradition you adhere to and other aspects of your personal situation. For example, if you align with the Theravada tradition, lucid dreaming may be a ...


2

Ajahn Chah once answered this similar question with something like; "dung beetles can fly, what is so special about flying?". He was asked if he could fly. IMO ajahn Chah tried to say that the curiosity was misplaced and it would never lead to cessation or total liberation.


2

In Tibetan Buddhism there is the concept of dream yoga which is a tantric practice within the Bardos of dream and sleep. To quote from wikipedia Finally, in the sixth stage, the images of deities (Buddhas, Bodhisattvas, or Dakinis) should be visualized in the lucid dream state. [..] They are said to be linked to or resonate with the clear light of ...


2

It is likely that the quote you are referring to is all conditioned dharma are like dreams, illusions, bubbles, shadows, Like dew drops (in the morning sun), or a lightening flash, contemplate them thus. All sentient beings have Buddha Nature. Wisdom realizing the holy state of Emptiness and Compassion for all sentient beings uniting. The above gatha is ...


2

Other than in situation you are in deep sleep (bhavanga) you create Kamma. Since when you are dreaming you are still creating karma as you cannot dream in deep sleep. These are not very strong or deep kamma and in most cases may not give any results and if they do they will be very mild (maybe like an itch which we might experience then the result comes). ...


2

According to Buddhism, to do a sin, you have to consciously do something using your body, speech or using sitha. In a dream you are not doing anything consciously. Therefore simply you can not sin in dreams.


2

Maintain extraordinarily sharp attentiveness to your body as you fall asleep. Your day-time meditation practice will have to be regular and consistent, without a daytime practice dreamtime practice will not really have a foundation to rest upon. When you fall asleep, train yourself to stay aware of how all your limbs feel, the tension or laxity in your ...


2

I think it's listed as a point of controversy in the Abhidhamma -- Kv 22.6: Controverted Point: That all dream-consciousness is ethically neutral. 22.6.1 Theravādin: You admit, do you not, that a dreamer may (in dreams) commit murder, theft, etc.? How then can you call such consciousness ethically neutral? 22.6.2 Uttarapāthakas: If I am wrong, was it not ...


1

If there is one meditation, it is ‘Aanaapanasati’ Meditation. You can direct your breathing meditation to other aspects if you want to. One such is having the breath as a way of training yourself to be kind to yourself and others in developing goodwill. Likewise you can breathe in such a way that puts yourself to sleep. Here you do not entertain any ...


1

Any meditation technique will not have the same effect on two individuals. Each individuals is sum total your previous Fabrications and our past habits. Also our temperaments are different. Say we have been practicing a certain meditation in your past lives also. In this life also it does become very easy to pick up. Also our temperament can decide on ...


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