21 votes

Is Nirvana the goal for all Buddhist?

No, Nirvana is not the goal of all Buddhists. According to Sakya and Nyingma schools of Tibetan Buddhism, Buddhist liberation methodologies can be divided in three major classes, corresponding to ...
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  • 55.4k
19 votes

Where does a person go after attaining Nirvana?

In one sense he continues just as we do. Once he attained nirvana under the Bodhi tree, the Buddha carried on teaching for another 50 years. It was only on the death of his physical body that he ...
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  • 20.9k
15 votes
Accepted

Buddhism, mothers and earthworms

I'm pretty sure the belief is not that earthworms become mothers, it's that every earthworm has most likely been your mother at some point in the past, as per the mata sutta (SN 15.14-19): At ...
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  • 23.9k
13 votes
Accepted

What teachings do all schools of Buddhism share?

There is an existent reference to the similarities between Theravāda & Mahāyāna which I will cite: (I think it also applies to Vajrayāna although I may be wrong in this regard.) Whatever our ...
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  • 3,726
12 votes

Where does a person go after attaining Nirvana?

There was no person existing in the 1st place to cease to exist. What you mistake as a person is just the 5 aggregates of clinging. They are just natural processes of causes and effects. Once you ...
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11 votes

Is Nirvana the goal for all Buddhist?

In the grand scheme of things, ending suffering and with it the endless cycle of rebirth is the ultimate goal of all forms of Buddhism. However, while Theravada Buddhism focusses on personal ...
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  • 1,495
11 votes

Where does a person go after attaining Nirvana?

As I understand it, Crab Bucket is correct that this is a question to which an answer is never given. I will contribute some source and try to flesh out this answer a bit: According to the Avyakata ...
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  • 2,534
10 votes

Is rebirth/reincarnation central to Buddhism?

There are two concepts here. We pass away every moment and arise every minutes. Other is rebirth after death. Rebirth is partly a belief but much of the Dhamma should be realised at experiential level....
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8 votes

Philosophical and Doctrinal Differences between Theravada and Zen, and its effects

It's, in a way, like comparing apples and oranges. Theravada means teaching of the elders; all it means is taking the Pali tipitaka and commentaries as more or less orthodox, and denying any teaching ...
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7 votes

Is Nirvana the goal for all Buddhist?

No. If your goal is to attain enlightenment you've gotten it all wrong and I would recommend Brad Warner's book, Hardcore Zen. It is much more important to act appropriately. From the book: I'd ...
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7 votes

Is Nirvana the goal for all Buddhist?

Many times, especially when responding to speculative questions, the Buddha announced that he teaches just two things — the universality of suffering and the path to the ending of suffering. That's ...
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  • 131
7 votes

Buddhism, mothers and earthworms

This question assumes frame of reference different from the one Buddhism operates in. The point of teachings is to produce a certain state of mind, that will affect your behavior in certain way, that ...
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  • 55.4k
6 votes

What teachings do all schools of Buddhism share?

As well as the list which is quoted in Unrul3r's answer there are, also, three other lists included on Wikipedia's Basic points unifying Theravāda and Mahāyāna article. A less canonical list was ...
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  • 43.4k
6 votes

As a disciple of the Supreme Buddha, what would you do with an animal that is in severe pain?

My mother and I saw a cat today by the side of the road, which had probably been hit by a car. Its back legs were outstretched, it didn't walk, I guessed its lower back was broken. It miaowed to us. ...
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  • 43.4k
5 votes
Accepted

Differences between the tilakkhana and the Dhamma seal

This article, Four Dharma Seals, says: As suffering is not an inherent aspect of existence sometimes the second seal is omitted to make Three Dharma Seals. From that I get the impression that, ...
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  • 43.4k
5 votes

Studying the subject "the four Buddhist schools/systems of tenets" (Vaibhāṣika, Sautrāntika, Cittamātra, Mādhyamika) in English

I would recommend Insight into Emptiness by by Khensur Jampa Tegchok and Thubten Chodron. This book discusses the tenets of all four of these schools and compares and contrasts them. Further, the ...
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  • 4,236
4 votes

Can personal experience generate buddhistic insight outside of meditation?

It's similar to going to a funeral, seeing the dead body and realizing that your turn is coming too. Jealousy is a subset of aversion. Aversion is 1 of the 3 evil roots that causes suffering. So if ...
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4 votes

Are there any body who achieved Nibbana currently (in the current world)

I think this question has a great potential for misunderstanding the concept of Nibbana. Why is it important to know? There is no way to know if Nibbana is just another silly concept like God except ...
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4 votes
Accepted

The thorny issue of anatta

There are several questions brought up here. One I see you asking: is the entire teaching of Buddha- with everything it has to offer -- is a true explanation of reality or is it merely a useful ...
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  • 55.4k
3 votes

Was the doctrine of 'Anatta', accepted as doctrine by modern Buddhism, actually taught by the Buddha?

The Buddha in the Suttas taught not-self, not no self. In the Maha-Nidana Sutta, the Buddha speaks of not-self. Here is what he says about people who say feelings are the Self: "Now, one who says, '...
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  • 866
3 votes

Is rebirth/reincarnation central to Buddhism?

Would you characterize belief in rebirth as a central component of Buddhism? In short, I personally don't. I think the central component depends on what you want to achieve and what is the best ...
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  • 411
3 votes

Is Nirvana the goal for all Buddhist?

Simple answer to your two questions Is Nirvana a goal which every Buddhist must achieve? Yes. Ending the suffering is the ultimate goal of a true budhist Is there any other things more important ...
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