Hot answers tagged

12

Open source is awesome philosophically speaking, and that's really what counts in the dharma, not the actual benefit that accrues to others. A core tenet of Buddhism is to not cling: "And he clings to nothing in the world." -- The Buddha (MN 10) So, regardless of the nature of your work, the fact that you are able to give up your attachment to its ...


7

Yes, in walking meditation we can use any of the 40 objects of meditation. Listening to Dhamma talks would put it under recollection of the dhamma as it gave you a sense of appreciation of the truth of the dhamma, IMHO,rather than the investigation of Dhamma (Dhammavicaya). "Mahanama, you should develop this recollection of the Dhamma while you are ...


5

There is no real difference between: this current moment in life with future moments afterwards with Nirvana as the climax and this current life with a string of lives afterwards with Nirvana as the climax. The practitioner of the Buddha's teaching, done without ego, needs no future incentive. Therefore, We "should" practice to become enlightened and ...


5

Intention matters. What brings one to open source decides whether it is completely wholesome or has taints. If I'm in in open source because I hate Microsoft, it is unwholesome. If I'm writing software so that I become famous one day like Linus Torvalds and drive a BMW, that's unwholesome. If I'm there to help people, teach students, solve problems for ...


4

Here's a good story of a Buddhist reaction to a genocide in Lord Buddha's time. "Lord Buddha's family/cast (Shrathriya/Shakya) was at the top of the casts at the time and they were very proud of it.Once a kind requested a princess for a marriage from Shrathriya/Shakya cast.But because of their ego they tricked the king by sending a pretty slave girl as a ...


4

Bodhidharma is the legendary founder of Zen in China. He is said to have arrived in China about 520 CE. (Buddhism had by then been known in China for about 400 years.) He was soon summoned to the emperor, who had questions for him. "I have endowed hundreds of temples and monasteries, and endorsed the ordination of thousands of monks and nuns; what is ...


4

From the perspective of the old Pali scriptures, I am not aware of anywhere that states: "It is more difficult to achieve nibbana in the a godly realm than in the human realm". For example, AN 4.123 describes Nirvana ("unbound") in the god realms. I think the answer to this common view is based in the type of 'godly' realm. A most common godly realm in ...


4

from an EBT (early buddhist text) perspective: http://lucid24.org/tped/d/dhamma/index.html#dhammamsutva ☸Dhamma, dhamma ☸Dhamma = The Buddha's Teaching. Dhamma = Natural laws of the universe, like impermanence, death, illness, etc. dhamma = idea/thought cognizable by the mind (6aya): 💭 manasā dhammaṃ viññāya. dhamma = thing. A broad term that can mean ...


3

In his commentary to Maitreya’s Mahayanottaratantra-ratnagotravibhanga, Gyaltsab Je says: Because just as every drop of water is of one taste with the ocean, so every phenomenon is of one taste within natural emptiness. Geshe Jamphel Gyaltsen's explains: The absence of inherent existence of the mind of an ordinary sentient being, an arya or buddha is ...


3

Life does not end with the moment of death. A new birth is taken based on the last thought that came at the time of death. If you it is suicide, the thoughts towards the end of your life are not positive. Therefore your future existence will not be a good one. It will be one of misery and pain. The Buddha taught the realism of how misery arises and the way ...


3

If you are sick or feeling unwell, why see a doctor? If you live in a cave, why live in a clean modern house? If you can walk, why drive a car or fly in an airplane? If you are hungry, why eat? If you are thirsty, why drink? If there are no past and future lives, why should we practice Buddhism? For happiness, ease & well-being. The Buddha ...


3

In the pali canon, the Kesaputtiya sutta have the Buddha explaining the benefits of practicing high virtue by those who may believe in the after life, who may not believe it, who may believe there's no karma law, and who may not believe there's karma law. He states that a virtuous person who practices virtue and the brahma-viharas have four assurances in ...


3

Dhamma Greetings user1835337, Buddha 'Dhamma' is the 'teaching' of the Buddha and Dāna (giving) is one part of it. Openhearted giving (Dāna) is on of the three basic and main exercises recommended by the Buddha for lay people. It is a preparatory and accompanying exercise at the same time. Giving for the well-being of others just because one has fun doing ...


3

Praise and blame is whether what you're doing is right or wrong, according to someone. Fame and insignificance is whether a lot of people consider you special or not. For example, if you have a Buddhist teacher, and your teacher tells you that worrying about fame is wrong, then you may completely abandon all concerns about being popular, but you may still ...


3

I think that "atta" and "atman" are the same words, two different languages (Pali and Sanskrit). That in a Buddhist context, "atta" (and its converse, "anatta") are related to ideas like upādānakkhandha (from SN 56.11) and sakkāyadiṭṭhi ... and furthermore that (according to doctrine) any/all theories about self (or "self-existence"?) are unsatisfactory or ...


3

There are several questions brought up here. One I see you asking: is the entire teaching of Buddha- with everything it has to offer -- is a true explanation of reality or is it merely a useful fiction, an expedient mean for achieving a goal (liberation from suffering)? To me the answer is clear. Any explanation of reality is a conceptual model. Every ...


2

Short Answer: No. Long Answer: First, you'll need to define what you mean by consciousness. If we take consciousness as "conscious awareness" then by definition, if you don't have consciousness of something, then you are not sensuously aware of it. However, it's possible that you may unconsciously register things that impact your consciousness later. ...


2

I don't know if the word "dependent" is 100% correct. I would say suffering is the supporting condition for cessation. From Upanisaa Sutta suffering is the support condition for faith faith is the support condition for joy joy is the support condition for delight delight is the support condition for tranquillity tranquillity is the support condition ...


2

Although nirodha is usually translated "cessation", its main meaning is "restraint", "prevention" - e.g. of crime or any undesired activity/outcome. In modern Hindi, nirodh is even used as a word for condom. If you really think about it, this makes sense. The way cessation of dukkha is achieved is through non-attachment - i.e. non-creation of conditions ...


2

I believe you may be referring to the passage in the Kuddhaka Nikaya -- Udana 5:5 The Uposattha Sutta: Where the Buddha said of his system of teaching and discipline: “bhikkhave, mahāsamuddo ekaraso loṇaraso. Evameva kho bhikkhave, ayaṃ dhammavinayo ekaraso vimuttiraso. “ “Just as the ocean has one taste, the taste of salt, even so, this teaching and ...


2

interested in any philosophical, literary, or religious answer on what "taste" means there The quote in Tenzin Dorje's answer reminds me of one of the Pali suttas, which says, Just as the great ocean has one taste, the taste of salt, so also this Dhamma and Discipline has one taste, the taste of liberation. Bikkhu Bodhi wrote an essay on that, The Taste ...


2

The Buddha never justified violence of killing any living being. "Monks, even if bandits were to savagely sever you, limb by limb, with a double-handled saw, even then, whoever of you harbors ill will at heart would not be upholding my Teaching." Kakacupama Sutta Not even under extreme circumstances did he justify killing. "One is not called noble ...


2

Notice the Heart Sutra's subsequent sentences' explanation: This is because in emptiness there is no form, sensation, conception, synthesis, or discrimination. There are no eyes, ears, nose, tongue, body, or thoughts. There are no forms, sounds, scents, tastes, sensations, or dharmas. There is no field of vision and there is no realm of thoughts. There is ...


2

I think you must be thinking of 'middle'. Things have beginnings, middles, and ends. And yes the suttas are filled with discussions of all three. "It was not until I had thoroughly understood the six senses, the origin of the six senses, the satisfaction of the six senses, the problem with the six senses, the end of the six senses, and the way to the end of ...


2

The word dhamma in these passages has multiple meanings and can only be understood in the context of the passage they come from as you seem to understand. This is difficult for most Buddhist students and anyone who does not speak the original language of these ancient texts. That is why it is important to rely upon good translations and on good spiritual ...


2

There are two languages, Pali and Sanskrit. Pali sounds like a mumbled version of Sanskrit, basically. Many of the consonants found in Sanskrit words are skipped in corresponding Pali words. So Dharma is Sanskrit and Dhamma is Pali. Atma is Sanskrit and Atta is Pali. Anatma is Sanskrit and Anatta is Pali. Sarva is Sanskrit and Sabba is Pali. Nirvana is ...


2

I'd like to hear your views on the arguments on both sides. Anatta: only a strategy for realization or a real "ontological" position? It is both. From Sutta Nipata 4.14: Seeing in what way is a monk unbound, clinging to nothing in the world?" "He should put an entire stop to the root of objectification-classifications: 'I am the thinker.' This ...


1

It depends, there are three realms Desire, Form, Formless. Desire realm gods as the name suggests have desires and are more likely to be attached to their luxuries making it hard to study the Dharma. However, Form and Formless realm gods all attained their positions from high skill in meditation and are far less attached to desire and they probably don't ...


1

Killing of a human in Buddhism is justified by the killer going to hell. Unless the killing results in saving the whole earth, not just saving Myanmar alone!


1

Tama (dark) to Tama (dark) Tama (dark) to Joti (light) Joti (light) to tama (dark) Joti (light) to Joti (light) There are those going from darkness to darkness, darkness to light, light to darkness, and light to light--four different categories -- from the Puggala Sutta (SN 3.21/S.I. 93ff).


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible