9

This is actually a mistranslation of the verse; Buddhist Legends by Burlingame is a bit better: The Buddha, unlimited in power, the trackless. By what track can you lead him? In order to understand this verse, it might help to see the context; the Buddha is using poetry and imagery. Here's the Pali leading up to the verses in the commentary (it's about ...


8

The verse speaks from the point of view of the bhikku. The verse should be understood properly: The bad and good bhikkhus were searching for companionship. They found companionship with Thera. The bad bhikkhu did not respect Thera, was not obedient and dutiful and was offended and extremely angry when Thera said something to him. Why? Because he thought ...


6

Thanissaro's translations are... unique. The word being used, as others have pointed out, is "mano", the leader of an irregular group of nouns called the "manogana" - "the group with mano as its leader". The PED has a huge article on mano, worth reading in full if you're interested. I've copied the gist of it below, but as you should see, it is probably ...


6

Here's a list: AccessToInsight's Dhammapada - various translations (Buddharakkhita, Thanissaro, and a few others) - web-based Suttacentral's Dhammapada - various translations (Anandajoti, Buddharakkhita) - web-based Ven. Thanissaro's translation of Dhammapada - in PDF Ven. Thanissaro's translation of Dhammapada - web-based Acharya Buddharakkhita's ...


5

It is simply saying that you should not cling to people as clinging causes suffering. What you practice towards friends and family are Kindness(Metta), Compassion(Karuna), Sympathetic Joy(Mudita), Equanimity(Upekkha). They are called the 4 divine abidings. Craving and clinging are not required to have a friendship.


5

I agree with @ChrisW. In addition to his answer: Here is a quote from the Sigalovada Sutta that supports investment in business. The wise endowed with virtue Shine forth like a burning fire, Gathering wealth as bees do honey And heaping it up like an ant hill. Once wealth is accumulated, Family and household life may follow. By dividing wealth into ...


5

Yes, there is indeed. The commentarial text includes both these stories and word-by-word commentary on the verses themselves. The story parts were translated into English long ago by Burlingame as "Buddhist Legends". The PDF version is available here: http://static.sirimangalo.org/pdf/ in three volumes. (Search the page for "Buddhist Legends&...


5

https://nanda.online-dhamma.net/tipitaka/sutta/khuddaka/dhammapada/dhp-contrast-reading/dhp-contrast-reading-en/ Eight translations side by side Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (PTS) [1] Pāḷi Tipiṭaka (CSCD) [2] Translated from the Pali by Ven Nārada Thera ) [3] Translated from the Pali by Ven. Ācharya Buddharakkhita ) [4] Translated from the Pali by Ven. Thanissaro Bhikkhu )...


4

It seems this was already answered sufficiently here: https://buddhism.stackexchange.com/a/1421/18 (Posting as an answer just to get this resolved)


4

'Capitalism' is something to do with 'capital', which I think implies, Ability to accumulate millions of dollars in order to build a new factory, a new ship, a new road, a new hospital (and/or one dollar to buy some butter, etc.) Ability to use such 'dollars' to rent labour (i.e. to pay wages) I don't see that as inherently anti-Buddhist: IMO it can fit ...


4

This is obviously self preserving pragmatism No. It's a Sila, Samadhi, Panna preserving and improving principle. It is very conducive to the practice of the noble eightfold path. ex: The right effort (1) to prevent the arising of unarisen unwholesome states; (2) to abandon unwholesome states that have already arisen; (3) to arouse wholesome states that ...


3

The PTS dictionary says, Dhana (nt.) [Ved. dhana; usually taken to dhā (see dadhāti) as "stake, prize at game, booty," cp. pradhāna & Gr. qe/ma; but more likely in orig. meaning "grain, possession of corn, crops etc.," cp. Lith. dūna bread, Sk. dhānā pl. grains & dhañña=dhana -- like, i. e. corn, grain] wealth, usually wealth of money, riches, ...


3

Radhakrishnan is not a wholly reliable guide to the Dhammapada. One must read him with care. The Pāḷi is Kena padenāti yassa hi rāgapadādīsu ekapadampi atthi, taṃ tumhe tena padena nessatha. Buddhassa pana ekapadampi natthi, taṃ apadaṃ buddhaṃ tumhe kena padena nessatha. Dhammapada Aṭṭhakathā, 3.196. It's from Buddhaghosa's commentary on the Dhammapada ...


3

"What is the original Pali phrasing?" Verse I Manopubbangamā dhammā manosetthā manomayā, manasā che padutthena bhāsati vā karoti vā tato nan dukkha manveti chakkan va vahato padan. Verse II Manopubbangamā dhammā manosetthā manomayā, manasā che pasannena bhāsati vā karoti vā tato nan sukhamanveti chāyā va anapāyinī. "and which words are ...


3

"The other shore", " beyond" is a common metaphor for transcendental realization. "This shore" or "not-beyond" is then this worldly life with its pleasures and sorrows. The one who is neither beyond nor not-beyond has no craving for transcendental realization, or escape, nor is tangled up in this world's affairs.


3

Here is another translation 385. He for whom there is neither this shore nor the other shore, nor yet both, he who is free of cares and is unfettered — him do I call a holy man. [27] Here's a footnote: (v. 385) This shore: the six sense organs; the other shore: their corresponding objects; both: I-ness and my-ness. Here's a Sutta which includes the ...


3

What qualities of the Buddha does trackless point to? The answer to this question seems to require extrapolation, so here goes my take on it. I would say that, as the second verse mentions, the quality is the absence of craving. The full absence of craving implies the absence of the conceit "I am". With this in mind, if the Buddha himself doesn't identify ...


3

You should not believe all the stories to become a Buddhist dear friend. Instead you should believe Noble Eightfold Path and taking refuge in the triple Gems (Load Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha). Taking refuge doesn't mean that the person has to pray for them or looking forward until they do something for you. We have to believe Lord Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha ...


3

does wealth refer here to spiritual qualities and virtues ? Wealth here literally means the wealth from householders. The background story to the verse might be helpful here: https://www.tipitaka.net/tipitaka/dhp/verseload.php?verse=155


2

In this case apada ("stationless") means the same thing as animitta ("groundless", "unconditioned", "motiveless") and aniketa ("homeless"). This refers to what some modern practitioners like your faithful call "losing the form". What it means exactly is that Buddha has no footing in any single standpoint or position. So you can't pinpoint Buddha and Buddha'...


2

The phenomena you mention is so common it has a name. BuJu or JuBu. In fact, there's even a Wikipedia Page on it. Furthermore, the contribution to (Western) Buddhism by Jews is very impressive! Whether this is frowned upon depends on how your Jewish faith and Buddhist practice relate. Whether they contradict, co-exist or complement depends in turn on ...


2

Here is what I found: Manopubbangama dhamma manosettha manomaya manasa ce padutthena There's translation and commentary on the page above. The associated story ("The Story of Thera Cakkhupala") suggests it might be 'intention'. That's kind of compatible with the poetic use of heart: "he had a change of heart", "his heart wasn't in it", "he did it ...


2

Intent is everything. .. The key.


2

There's a slightly different translation here which says "skill" instead of "knowledge": The skill of a fool can only harm him; it destroys his merit and his wisdom (lit., it severs his head). In the background story, the example of "skill" is of someone who "was very skilful in throwing stones at things". Also, "cleaves his head" is a literal ...


2

I think part of the problem is the translation as fools. Eknath Easwaran translates this as spiritually immature. In the introduction to chapter six of the Dhammapada in his translation he says The title of chapter 5 is normally translated as "The Fool". [...]. However bala means not only "fool" but "child" For me the term fool is ladened with harsh ...


2

I want to say something, not about karma but about doing it now. The middle way notwithstanding, perhaps it was essential to the Buddha's own enlightenment. I don't know in which sutta this appears, but this narration of the life of the Buddha by Bikkhu Bodhi says, Now he was alone, and complete solitude allowed him to pursue his quest undisturbed. One ...


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