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11

Speaking from the first hand experience, laziness comes from attachment, fear, or ignorance. No attachment, no fear, and no ignorance - translates to no laziness. And how does attachment cause laziness? Someone is attached to what they think is a pleasant pastime, taking delight and enjoying that experience. For such person, anything apart from that ...


8

What matters is what you do when you are single. If being single means using prostitutes to satisfy one's sensual desires, it could lead one further away from the path as compared to a person who restrains himself to one woman and practices loyalty, kindness, doing good deeds together etc. But if being single means being celibate and using one's free time ...


8

So basically caught up in the social norms, i used to watch porn videos and masturbate and got a bit attached to it. Kept on doing it for a few years. Do not underestimate the harm & addictive character of pornography. Buddhism calls it a 'road to ruin' (DN 31). To ask your questions, you have been learning this via personal experience. And 2 ...


8

Working on your hobbies, advancing your career, growing a business, developing a family, nurturing a child, improving your health through good diet and exercise, going on vacations, increasing your wealth, using your money for the enjoyment or development of yourself and others, raising your status in the world, attaining fame in society etc. could all make ...


7

Yuttadhammo Bhikkhu answers a question about "guarding the senses" in this video (at time 34:40). Guarding the sense doors is a way of protecting ourselves from being overcome by passion for the sensed object (which leads to dukkha). In his video Yuttadhammo mentions three ways to do this. Physically avoiding the object (in relation to your example, when ...


6

One of my friends asked me if I talk to her just out of compassion instead of out of real feelings of friendship. That question really freaked me out, especially because it seems to be pointing to some truth Indeed. Insightful or intuitive question by the lady One part of me wants to keep going along this Path, because all of the peace it has brought to ...


5

No. I'd say that Buddhism is or can be pro (in favour of) a scientific attitude. The structure of the four noble truths, for example, are analogous to medical thinking: symptoms, cause, cure, and prescription (or, possibly, analogous to the "scientific method": observations, hypothesis, prediction, and experiment). Also there are different types of ...


5

With each contact your perceive the experience: a pleasant, unpleasant or neutral feeling arises which you also perceive as either favorable, unfavorable and neutral. "Guarding the sense door" is you are aware of the sensation that arose and the perception that arose. Ideally you should be equanimous towards this experience, i.e., not attached or averse to ...


5

It is not morally wrong. The question is if it is helpful or not! Clearly, lust and pornography are helpful for temporally satisfying the craving of sexual gratification. In that sense, they are skillful. On the other hand craving for sexual gratification can be a hindrance and therefore unskillful if one has other goals... namely the pacification of ...


5

Enlightened people do not overgeneralize. (This can be supported by both Pali Canon as well as Mahayana sources.) Concepts like "enlightened", "person", "I", and "thinking" are all overgeneralizations, which enlightened people do not dwell in. They may use generalizations as skilful means, to communicate the teaching, but they themselves are not bounded ...


4

As you've said, it all varies from individual to individual. The bottom line is one should not do what other people expects one to do. Instead, do whatever is best for oneself in terms of peace, happiness, and most important, suitable and favorable conditions to the learning, contemplation, and practice of the Buddha Dhamma. Please see DN 29, where the ...


4

Attachment (and the other things you mention) are described among the Twelve Nidānas. For example chocolate exists as: Name ("chocolate") and Form (the form of chocolate) Sensuality (sight, taste, touch, smell, idea) Contact (between our consciousness, our senses, and chocolate's form) Desire Attachment Memories You're right if you're saying that the ...


4

The word ‘vijja’—translated here as clear knowing—also means ‘science.’ And just as science implies a method, there is a method—a discipline—underlying the knowledge that leads to Unbinding. If Dhamma equates to ‘vijja’, then the prevailing scientific attitude is ‘a-vijja’, as it leads to more binding. Unlike the Dhamma, the method, the discipline, and ...


4

It's not desire that leads to pleasure, it is ("good") action that does. Desire in and of itself is blind, it just wants, craves. Desire does not always translate into good action. Instead, 1) There could be passive frustrating hopeless desire. 2) There could be blind desire that makes you act in self-destructing ways. So desire for pleasure could very ...


4

Is Buddhism against scientific attitude? Is it against scientific research? Kalama Sutta embodies scientific thinking where nothing should be accepted due to various non scientific reasoning. The non rational reasons are: Do not go upon what has been acquired by repeated hearing (anussava), nor upon tradition (paramparā), nor upon rumor (itikirā), nor ...


4

On the mundane level, all the other answers are okay. On the supramundane level, it's not as much about partaking of sex as it is about your attitude, the implications of the relationship, the implications of how the experience is framed. Any time you find gratification (enjoyment) in sensual experiences, you harbor an attitude of desire towards them. You ...


4

I think that the Pali distinguishes two words: tanha -- "craving" or more literally "thirst" chanda -- "desire" or maybe intention One of the six occasional mental factors in the Theravada Abhidharma; in this tradition, chanda is a factor that can have positive or negative result depending upon the mental factors that it is ...


4

OP: What is the difference between chanda and cetana? Chanda is the desire to act. E.g. if you stand from a seat you have to have the "intention" to do it, but can choose not to if you want A Comprehensive Manual of Abhidhamma Cetana is volition. This is what makes you commit a certain course of action to realise a goal or a wish. E.g. I a feeling hungry ...


4

Sloth and Topher is the fifth Mara. It activated when all other previous four maras are inactivated. For instance, when you watch TV the first mara is in charge. When you listen to Dhamma if the fourth Mara is not in charge you will go to sleep. This is a complex case. The way to avoid this is to practice walking meditation. https://dhammawheel.com/...


3

Strictly speaking, Buddhism doesn't say "desire" is the cause of suffering, but that craving rooted in attachment is the cause of suffering. Sometimes scientific curiosity is rooted in attachment, but other times it's rooted in wholesome motives such as compassion. Often the motives are a combination of the two. So I think Buddhism is silent on this ...


3

In the Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta, the Buddha said "craving (tanha) is source of all suffering". So, tanha (craving) can be avoided. It does not have to be part of life. The Buddha said there was a path to the cessation of this suffering, which was following the eightfold path. The 2nd factor of the eightfold is path is 'right desire' or 'right intention'. ...


3

I think the question is on the four iddhipada, the four mental factors of achieving a goal: chanda (intention), citta (thoughts), viriya (effort), wimansa (investigation). According to this section in wikipedia, there's a collection of discourses on this topic in Saṃyutta Nikāya called Iddhipāda Saṃyutta.


3

Sometimes when you are doing Asubha meditation you might get averse to the thoughts about Suba. There was a situation when some monks committed suicide because they got averse to their bodies as dirty. Here the mind's tendency to be attached to one's body turned drastically and became averse. The objective of Asuba is to develop a balance of the mind. When ...


3

As my teacher explained (sorry, this looks silly, but I always have to start my answers with something like this, since I'm not quoting texts but none of this is my invention), there is a difference between a desire (aka "should") and an intent (aka "will") Desire is a point of inner discontent. Half of you is here, without girlfriend, and the other half ...


3

In Pali Canon, Buddha gives the following image of Will Power: Gladly would I let the flesh & blood in my body dry up, leaving just the skin, tendons, & bones, but if I have not attained what can be reached through human firmness, human persistence, human striving, there will be no relaxing my persistence. According to my teacher, if you look at ...


3

I'm sorry to hear about your mother's discomforts. I used to have similar panic attacks that would bring on hyperventilation, taking Xanax and in extreme cases calling the paramedics as well, even though I had studied Buddhism academically for many years and I "knew" it should be able to help me. It was only when I actually started practicing in stead of ...


3

The word "desire" is an English word. The Buddha did not speak English. Buddhism teaches "tanha" is the root of suffering. "Tanha" is generally translated as "craving". It literally means "thirst". "Tanha" is uwnwholesome. Therefore, in respect to meditation, the type of "wholesome or skilful desire" used in meditation is called "chanda iddhipada" or "...


3

OP: Simillary, All we are like to gain a calm and pure mind. So we meditate. Isn't it a desire ? This is the case if you react with attachment and pleasure when the mind calms down and react with aversion and displease when it does not. In meditating on should not get attached to the outcome. So regardless of your mind gets calm or not one should be ...


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