4

Whatever experience we get used to and grow comfortable in -- with that we identify, to that we attach. Then anything that looks like it could help us get that experience again -- seems good to us, and anything that goes contrary to that -- seems bad to us. Next time we see a sign, we recognize the form, we associate the name with that past experience. ...


4

Buddhism does not state 'perception' ('sanna') is a chain. In fact, without perception, enlightenment (perceiving the true nature of things, including perception itself) cannot occur. Instead, Buddhism lists the following chains (fetters): belief in a self (Pali: sakkāya-diṭṭhi) doubt or uncertainty, especially about the teachings (vicikicchā) wrong use ...


3

Ven.Yuttadhammo bhikkhu has given you proper advice. Being true to monkhood is being rooted and grounded in a Life of celibacy. The benefits of celibacy (sexual abstinence) are obviously not widely understood nor fully appreciated. Even though sex may be a natural, essential part of life, so is being stuck in a physical body along with all its severe ...


3

I don't think it fits well. The article claims there's an "independent reality"; and that evolution has shaped how we perceive reality (it's not specific, but if I'm to fill in the gaps and play devil's advocate, an example might be that we've evolved to see sex and violence as good?). The article is full of words which aren't well-defined (e.g. "...


2

From personal experience: If we don't counteract we might become a hopeless victim of the developing delusion, creating an object-subject tension. But counteraction should not create opposition or more tension, but a middle way in solving the slight or major disturbance. How it is done varies from mind to mind. I never understood the 'letting go' part - ...


2

My advise is do the 32 Parts of the Body Meditation (click the link to practice sytematically)or Asubha meditation.This helps counter a lustful mind.You are attracted to bodies because your not seeing the reality of it's unpleasantness.Since you magnified their attractive qualities to the point of masturbating you need to magnified their unattractive ...


2

There are three types of craving: craving for sensual pleasures, craving to become something (that makes someone have ambition) and the craving to not become something (that makes one suicidal or withdrawn). From Itivuttaka 58: This was said by the Blessed One, said by the Arahant, so I have heard: "There are these three cravings. Which three? Craving ...


2

Dictionary definitions here: moha avijjā I think of avijjā as (quite literally) describing something which you don't have (the a- prefix implies a negative, i.e. an absence of vijjā), and moha as something which you have instead (because you don't have vijjā). There's a round-about definition of avijjā ("ignorance") in SN 35.79 -- where, it says that what'...


2

I think it requires a lot of research or another's excellent research to answer this question. Often ignorance & delusion are used as synonyms, for example, as follows: Bhikkhus, I do not perceive any single hindrance other than the hindrance of ignorance by which humankind is so obstructed and for so long a time runs on and wanders in saṃsāra. ...


2

"Possessing" grave wrong view (niyata micca ditthi) is one of the 6 reasons why one is, better does (since holding a view is an action) incapable to grow in Dhamma, incapable in reaching even paths or fruits, yes. But! ...to think that the view of a being is something inherent, lasting, not conditioned, for it's own, is already near niyata micca ditthi. So ...


1

Lust is craving to get something or pull something in. Hatred is craving to push something away or destroy something. Delusion is craving that circles around an object; hoping/wanting to understand it. Lust is craving for sensual pleasures. Delusion is craving for becoming something (egoistically). Hatred is craving to not be or experience something. ...


1

I think most buddhist teachers would view this emotion/material distinction as a mistake. Thinking of the Statue of Liberty (SoL) as a lump of copper atoms is just as much a 'notion' as seeing it as a symbol of freedom or of tyranny, and is just as subject to emotional attachment. It may be a mere fact that the SoL is made out of copper, but that 'mere fact' ...


1

It does not matter if the Statue reminds us about freedom, or France, or poverty, or Trump's immigration policy, or copper and atoms - all of these are just thoughts and interpretations. What matters is, are these thoughts harmonious ("conducive to peace" in Buddhist lingo) or do they have an element of dis-harmony in them, a seed of conflict or clash ("...


1

I will not be able to give a long answer because I have not found any scriptural meaning of the word delusion. However the sanskrit term moha or delusion is a fairly common word. It means attachment. Buddha essentially says is to get rid of attachment in relation to the five aggregates. At one place here Buddha mentions how to get rid of delusion : One ...


1

Addiction of a thousand faces is pandemic in the "world". The harmonic of social and political instability and perhaps the sub-harmonics of rapid onset climate disruption and accelerating species extinctions also contribute to explicit and subtle triggering events. It may be possible to eradicate the behavioral loops of trigger, response, ease, and it may ...


1

The Buddhist path has 3 trainings: sila/morality samadhi/concentration panna/wisdom. To view a lady as a composite of flesh, bones, feces, pus, joint oil, etc, is the practise of panna/wisdom. It is called 'asubha'. There are many 'asubha' videos on Youtube. Not judging things as 'good' & 'bad' is the practice of samadhi/concentration but not the ...


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