12

In simple words, defilements are like little clouds that descend on the head -- and when you look around through one of them, you see everything in a different color or blurry or distorted. That's what they are, they are glitches that affect your interpretation and evaluation. The problem with defilements is that subjectively they are indistinguishable from ...


6

Indeed, there are four levels of craving. Craving for one's life - Highest level Craving for one's organs Craving for loved ones Craving for external objects - Lowest level Chathurarya Sathya (Four Noble truths) by Rerukane Chandawimala Thero Craving for life arises as perceiving the five aggregates as self and this is the highest level of craving. As an ...


6

Easy. Well, easy in theory :) -- you need to get fed up! You need to get really sick and tired of your conditions, so sick that you cannot live like that anymore. You are so fed up that you are either ready to die - or to change your habits. So that desire to get out leads to iron intent to change.


5

It is not at all a simple task to reverse the habits cultivated over umpteenth lifetimes. It is next to impossible without gaining a good knowledge of the Dhamma and putting it to practice diligently. Then, and only then you are going to have any success in thwarting the mind’s ingrained habits. The personality view is the hardest of them all. If you could ...


5

There are ten fetters eliminated in Vipassana meditation. Elimination does not occur before you reach the Sothapanna(stream enterer) state. Until then, fetters are only subdued. Once a fetter is eliminated, it's gone for good. Refer to the table below to know the fetters eliminated at each stage of the path. Yes, if you stop doing vipassana short of ...


5

Nibbana is actually best understood as the cessation of suffering. The lakkhanadicatuka for nibbana is as follows (minus proximate cause because it is uncaused): It has peace as its characteristic. Its function is not to die; or its function is to comfort. It is manifested as the signless; or it is manifested as non- diversification. -- Path Of ...


4

The term is used differently in different places in Theravada literature. In the 27th Samyutta of the Samyutta Nikaya, there are ten Suttas that talk about the kilesas, and the term is equated with desire-passion (Chanda-rago). For example, the first Sutta reads: At Savatthi. "Monks, any desire-passion with regard to the eye is a defilement of the mind. ...


4

The initial instinct will be to assign blame, or to approach the issue from a victim perspective. As meditators, we must know better and let go of these views. Powerful emotions can be very good teachers if we know how to harness the energy. The teachers in the Thich Nhat Hanh sangha have a detailed conflict resolution guide for exactly this situation ...


4

If a yard has lots of weeds, just by getting rid of the weeds alone won't be effective. One will also need to overseed their yard with strong grass so that they will overwhelm the weeds and grow into a healthy lush green lawn. Similarly, not only one needs to abandon bad habits, one'd also need to cultivate good habits so that they will "overwhelm" the bad ...


4

There is no place for anger in Buddhism for any reason. Right effort is what is required.


3

Paying conscious attention to whatever you are doing now fully, whatever the activity may be. Life is happening right now, right this moment as you read. Any actions have consequences, even thoughts. Unconscious activities have unknowable/unforeseeable consequences. Habits are like unconscious activities. If you are doing a good thing why don't you do it ...


3

Loving kindness or Metta meditation is the one recommended to counter anger. What you are talking about is a Vipassana meditation. Both work! But you need to keep practicing. The more you practice, the quicker you can observe. For me personally, observing the Anatta nature of anger helps to dissipate it fast. "sometime it is little bit too late to observer ...


2

There's an analysis on Wikipedia: The Buddha identified three types of taṇhā:[1][4][5][6][7][a] Kama-tanha (sense-craving): craving for sense objects which provide pleasant feeling, or craving for sensory pleasures. Bhava-tanha (craving to be): craving to be something, to unite with an experience. This includes craving to be solid and ongoing, ...


2

If you look at dependent origination and the Nidānas closely, craving arises due to feeling. You analyze the feeling and classify it as something desirable or undesirable or neither desirable or undesirable. These cravings can be: sense-craving craving to be craving not to be The above can be one classification of the types of cravings along with what @...


2

There is a solution given in Buddhism for the exact matter. I think you may have heard about the meditation called "Maithree / Meththa" (Metta). There is a certain variation of that to prevent such hate. So the solution is simple: do this meditation, specially targeting this person and the memory that you are trying to get rid of. After doing it for about ...


2

You might want to bookmark the following site that gives excellent definitions for common Buddhist terms: http://www.budsas.org/ebud/bud-dict/dic_idx.htm or download the PDF of this dictionary from: http://urbandharma.org/pdf/palidict.pdf. I have a hard copy of this dictionary and it is the most used book in my collection. An excellent resource for beginners ...


2

The Dhammapada says, Hatred is never appeased by hatred in this world. By non-hatred alone is hatred appeased. This is a law eternal. If or because that's so, I'm not sure that you can even want to view or analyse jealousy. The "opposite" of jealousy is Mudita. Perhaps the four immeasurables should be studied, not jealousy? I admit that I experience ...


2

The Pali Buddhist scriptures teach that present happiness & suffering of a person are not caused by actions performed in the past. Refer to AN 3.61, which states: When one falls back on what was done in the past as being essential, monks, there is no desire, no effort, 'This should be done. This shouldn't be done.' When one can't pin down as a truth ...


2

AN 9.36 Jhana Sutta: "'I tell you, the ending of the mental fermentations depends on the first jhana.' Thus it has been said. In reference to what was it said? There is the case where a monk, secluded (or "withdrawn") from sensuality, secluded from unskillful qualities, enters & remains in the first jhana: rapture & pleasure born of seclusion, ...


2

Each experience can trigger your habitual response which might be followed by and intention to act. What triggers your habitual or reflexive response is and external stimuli coming in contact with your sense faculties. So what you have to see is if your intention is good or bad. If it is good follow through else try to practice some restraint. When trying ...


2

All passions including anger are to be removed but until you achieve perfection don't cut too deep, don’t remove the passion against ignorance. Quoted below is from Shantideva's Bodhichryavatara / The Path of light. (emphasis my own) Ah, when I vowed to deliver all beings within the hounds of space in its ten points from the Passions, I myself had not ...


2

Anger is unskillful and destructive. Anger gains its power from a lack of restraint--we explode at a problem and obliterate/kill it. Strong anger leads to killing. Given that the first precept is "do not kill," angry action is Wrong Action. Therefore if our physical work is demolition, we should exert ourselves mindfully so as not to harm ourselves ...


2

As explained in oral Mahayana tradition, the twelve Nidanas schematically describe gradual process of emerging subjective experience of the world and a sense of self. The actual process is not linear and does not have 12 well-defined steps. Instead, 12 links should be considered as key milestones or features. The process itself is made of thousands or even ...


1

Defilements or misperceptions do not arise because of correct insight attainment. There might be some left. Maybe defiled insights, or "Gecko - Samadhi [vipassanupakkilesa]" ...To practice concentration without correct understanding may lead to wrong concentration, from which the person develops abnormal perceptions, the so-called vipassanupakkilesa... ...


1

The closest that I can find so far, from the Piti Sutta (AN 5.176): [The Blessed One said:] "Excellent, Sariputta. Excellent. When a disciple of the noble ones enters & remains in seclusion & rapture, there are five possibilities that do not exist at that time: The pain & distress dependent on sensuality do not exist at that time. The ...


1

Sloth & torpor is one of five hindances to concentration therefore it appears to imply being a psychological hindrance, particularly when some (partial) samadhi & tranquility has been developed. For example, SN 46.55 refers to sloth & torpor as mental sluggishness & heaviness: Again, Brahman, when a man dwells with his heart (mind) ...


1

Does drowsiness as a defilement only refer to a psychological state of mind? I know that emotions manifest also as physical phenomena, but how do I distinguish between physical exhaustion and psychological defilement? Drowsiness depends both on the psychological state and physical state. There is nothing purely psychological or purely physical. Both ...


1

When you watch a sad movie, you may feel sad at some points. But you won't carry the sadness with you and become depressed, would you? When you stop watching the movie, you immediately forget about it. Similarly, you treat the evil unskillful thoughts here like they were some movie appearing in your mind, and ignore them.


1

Being overly optimistic creates a turbulent mind, and in this Dhamma path it is important to calm your mind. Overly optimistic may fuel this “optimism bias” and specially in meditation takes you off base. An optimism bias, if its expectations are not met, its absence can signal anxiety or depression, its pessimistic opposite. The Buddhist term for this is ...


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