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"I remember the funerals of my childhood. They were all pretty hopeless affairs, with a very strong sense of powerlessness. God was supposed to be loving, and yet he’d taken our loved ones away, sometimes in very miserable ways, and we had to accept that. We had no idea where they were going, especially in the versions of Christianity where they teach ...


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I found the sutta I was looking for: https://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an06/an06.019.than.html It's AN 6.19.


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This is well explained by the Khemaka Sutta below. A person may be a stream enterer and have full understanding of the teachings, but still the residual "I am" conceit and passion for existing (and consequently the fear of non-existing) may linger, until he reaches full liberation. “Suppose, friends, a cloth has become soiled and stained, and its ...


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Buddhists, just like everyone else, are afraid to die. But they are afraid for different reasons. According to Lord Budhdha there are 31 planes of existence we can be re-incarnated: Realm of Formlessness (Arupaloka) consists of four planes of brahmas who have no physical body, consisting entirely of mind, but who may create a physical body if they want to ...


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Maybe your friend wasn't fear of death, it could be fears of: -not accomplishing what he wanted to accomplish in this life time? -injuries? Maybe your friend was more risk adverse than anyone else? By being a Buddhist doesn't mean you can be reckless in your current life and leave everything to the next life. Reincarnation is not taught to be a backup plan ...


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If you pick up a bowl of water and carry it across the room to a table, the water will splash against the sides of the bowl and develop eddies and waves as you move. If you come back an hour later, The splashing and eddies and waves are gone. So where did they go? When pure consciousness is disturbed it develops its own splashes and eddies and wavs. Some of ...


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Yes, but it depends on how you define "afraid". If you define "afraid" as a form of paralysis. inaction, and trauma then NO, that is not what Buddhism is about or any of the eastern practices. If you define "afraid" as a form of anxiety and stress leading to contemplation and ACTION (spiritual practice)... then YES, every single ...


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Yes and very needed to often reflect on it as it is the drive to become a real "Buddhist", and eventually free of reasons to have to fear it. Only one complete isn't a fool when not fearing the next becoming, birth, and with it: death. Householder-equanimity is a fools suicide.


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ChrisW has given a really good answer, and pointed out that Buddhism encompasses a wide range of beliefs. IMHO the range is wider than it is in Christianity. There are two broad families, characterized by Jiriki and tariki. tariki (他力 "other power", "outside help") includes the Pure Land schools that ChrisW mentioned. As with ...


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One aspect that strikes me is that the Buddhist should also consider the driver of the car. Stepping in harm's way is not kind to the other party, apart from potentially putting both parties in harm. And even if you're certain you can make it across without much hurry, either you may alarm the driver, or something may go wrong (ice, pothole, turned ankle). ...


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Crossing the street is dangerous. Cars have attempted to run me over as I cross legally with the light. That is a simple fact. I am also losing my eyesight, so the problem is even worse for me. What is not so simple is fear itself, whose roots run deep and tangle us up in knots. The Buddha is quite direct in his instruction here regarding fear: AN5.3:1.1: “...


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Summary ("Bottom Line Up Front") Buddhists should "fear" (or at least "avoid") other things than death -- for example immorality, heedlessness, causing harm. Here for example is an extract from an essay by Ven. Bodhi: The conduct of the ideal Buddhist sage, the arahant, necessarily embodies the highest standards of moral ...


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I think you've probably misunderstood your friend's actions. I mean, I myself have no real fear of death, but I would certainly prefer not to get smacked by a speeding car. It's not that it would kill me; it's that it would hurt, with serious potential for a long recovery or permanent debility. As they say, "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of ...


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The belief in reincarnation takes away the fear of death but it does not mean one has to act in a suicidal way or go on inviting death in any way. Buddhism has a deep respect for life as in this human life only Nirvana which is the ultimate goal of Buddhism possible. Also, we will have to make the best use of this life we are living to reach as close as ...


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Isn't this an obvious question? Should a Christian not "desire a wife of his neighbor", nor steal, nor mention God's name in vain etc. - but some still do. "A Buddhist" just like "a Christian" is not a concept cast in stone, as all concepts it is an abstraction, a generalization, an approximation, a simplification. Take any real ...


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