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The Pali suttas say the Dhamma is taught only to those who are interested, per AN 9.5: The best sort of kindly speech is to teach the Dhamma again and again to someone who is engaged and who lends an ear. Etadaggaṃ, bhikkhave, peyyavajjānaṃ yadidaṃ atthikassa ohitasotassa punappunaṃ dhammaṃ deseti. https://suttacentral.net/an9.5/en/sujato ...


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Difficult question because you wouldn't want these angry people turning on you because such people in the workplace often do. These people are often loitering in the workplace and can be a real danger. I left my last job due to such a person, who for years, I listened to, so often helped them with their work & at times even did their work for them. They ...


3

The instruction to do "one thing at a time" is implied by the Buddha's praise of Sāriputta's practice, which was intense, deep and accomplished methodically one by one: MN111:1.6: The Buddha said this: “Sāriputta is astute, mendicants. He has great wisdom, widespread wisdom, laughing wisdom, swift wisdom, sharp wisdom, and penetrating wisdom. For a ...


2

An Arahant is said to never deliberately tell a lie. That draws the line and it gives a categorical answer to your question. A lie is always best not told.


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You might want to distinguish between "attachment" and "craving" -- Why do the Noble Truths talk about 'craving', instead of about 'attachment'? -- it's more specifically "craving" that is deprecated. Then Buddhism distinguishes "craving" (tanha) from "desire" (chanda) -- and "desire" might be for a wholesome or an unwholesome object. How ...


2

Wrong second time. First time there is no factor of intention, second time you wanted him to die for whatever reason. Take a hypothetical example of a person who is unable to kill another intentionally, it being not in his range he couldn't have done it. If not killing is classed categorically as good then the person who doesn't kill can not be blamed for ...


2

Good listeners are often magnets for people who talk. Significantly, any emotional affirmation given while listening can perpetuate that very talking. Such emotional encouragement can stem from our own cravings and aversions. Therefore this is an opportunity for practice that can benefit us. In particular: MN62:8.5: This should be truly seen with right ...


2

The second? I met a pigeon this year which was crippled with an illness. I gave it shelter, food, and water, for about 10 days until it died. I figure that was maybe kinder than trying to kill it when it was helpless. If so, how can I mitigate this bad kamma? "Stop doing it" -- see this answer which quotes SN 42.8. And finally, how can we help him ...


1

What do you think of this story? Was I wrong the first time? The second? First time: no kamma ( unwitting/unintentional action ). Second time: mixed kamma with bright and dark results ( active intention/action to kill + active intention to alleviate the state of prolonged suffering ) If so, how can I mitigate this bad kamma? Be more mindful of whatever ...


1

First of all, you haven't forgotten how to live. Do not be discouraged. The fact that you have that seen how hollow everything is sounds to me like a moment of insight. It might be that you feel you have forgotten what really matters. But maybe you are also beginning to understand that you never actually understood what really matters. What we know ...


1

I cannot of course say what is happening with you. But here is a thought, since you have used the tag of impermanence for this question (and quite correctly, I think). Our minds are addicted to sensations- craving of pleasurable sensations and aversion to painful sensations. The addiction is to react, depending on which type of sensation one is ...


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He was giving analytical and categorical answers in due time. Stayed on topic. Didn't show hostility. Posed counter questions in due time. Did not back down. Was not intimidated. It is not a complete list.


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According to Abhidhamma, we can do only one thing at a time. (mind or thought-moment) However, as we are not paying attention we think they all happen at once. When you practice Satipathana you will understand this. When you practice Samatha you keep your attention only on the meditation object. In Vipassana you keep your attention only on one bodily ...


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The Buddha made a distinction between slow and fast practice. Since you're asking about procrastination, let's look at what the Buddha said about slow practice. As you can see, this path is indeed painful: AN4.162:2.1: And what’s the painful practice with slow insight? It’s when someone is ordinarily full of acute greed, hate, and delusion. They often ...


1

How do I know whether I am attached to certain things or not? All of the other answers are useful, but I’d suggest doing the thought experiment of either imagining yourself stepping up to the moment of giving it up completely or imagining yourself without that thing in your life. Then analyze your feelings to that situation. Could you honestly see yourself ...


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How do I know whether I am attached to ceratain things or not ? Evidently, until one's attained enlightenment, everyone still has attachments of at various different levels from gross to subtle. At the grosser/coarser end of the spectrum, attachment is severe craving, an addiction. And the telltale sign is very simple: one continues to do something s/he's ...


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Namo Buddhaya, This question really sparked me so thought to contribute. How do I know whether I am attached to something / someone? This depends on the individual and how personally that thing or that person is important in your life. What I meant by important is how strongly you have cling into thoughts of that person or thing (bonded) in your mind. ...


1

Excellent question! There are a few ways to detach yourself from someone insulting you that I tend to use. The first would be practicing something along the lines of ignorance is bliss in which you simply ignore - like water off a ducks back as they say. Your best friends are using your peripheral vision and assessing inside you are not emotionally affected ...


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You are not taking the whole of Buddhist teaching at this point. On the journey from unwiseness to being wise, each new insight obtained is good, but does not mean there is not more to learn. This very verse, as much of the dhammapada is, teaches from the view of an unwise beginner. The course involves all teachings, even beginner ones. Firstly, this ...


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